The inmates of a German World War II prisoner of war camp conduct an espionage and sabotage campaign right under the noses of their warders.
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6   5   4   3   2   1  
1971   1970   1969   1968   1967   1966   … See all »
Won 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Col. Robert E. Hogan (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Col. Wilhelm Klink (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. Hans Georg Schultz / ... (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Cpl. Louis LeBeau (167 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Cpl. Peter Newkirk (167 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. Andrew Carter / ... (166 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. James 'Kinch' Kinchloe / ... (141 episodes, 1965-1970)
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Storyline

Colonel Hogan leads a ragtag band of POW's caught behind German lines in this popular television comedy. The bumbling Germans give Hogan and his crew plenty of opportunities to sabotage their war efforts. Colonel Klink is more concerned with having everything run smoothly and avoiding any trouble with his superiors (especially anything that might result in his being reassigned and sent to the front) than with being tough on Hogan and his fellow prisoners. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Stalag 13: the camp where the prisoners plot to get in, not out. Starring Bob Crane, Werner Klemperer and John Banner. (season 6) See more »

Genres:

Comedy | War

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

17 September 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ein Käfig voller Helden  »

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(pilot)|

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

In the series, Hogan states he is from Bridgeport Connecticut. See more »

Goofs

In numerous episodes, when it is supposedly winter with patches of snow on the ground, you can see leaves still on the trees and green grass on the ground in the background. See more »

Quotes

[Hogan pretends to have passed out from drinking]
Colonel Klink: [to Burkhalter] ... Disgraceful. Can't hold their liquor. Can't finish wars they start.
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Connections

Referenced in Saturday Night Live: Robin Williams/Paul Simon (1986) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

Aaaahhh. Nostalgia.
31 December 2004 | by (Lincoln England) – See all my reviews

I've just heard the British comedian Joe Pasquale being asked to define good comedy and his answer was, tragedy plus time. Hogan's heroes (he said) was one of his inspirations and it reminded me how much I loved this show myself, all those years ago. Who would've thought a Nazi prison camp could be the setting for a comedy series, but it was, and the results were often hilarious. The basic formula is the adversarial daily life between American POWs and their German guards, constantly trying to put one over on each other. The main character was the senior American officer (Colonel Hogan) played by the charismatic Bob Crane who strangely never found fame in any other role and was tragically murdered in Arizona. What gives this show such strength is that the 2 lead Nazis (the overweight Sergeant Schultz & his pompous CO, Colonel Klink) were both played by Jewish actors. John Banner (Schultz) was Austrian and Werner Klemperer (Klink) was German and they both came to America as refugees from the wicked regime in their home countries. How's that for putting a finger up at Hitler! I hope fans of the show will like my own personal "contribution". Hogan's Heroes was a massive success in Britain in 1973/74 and close to where I grew up was a Ministry of Agriculture office. One of the guys who worked there was - literally - the spitting image of John Banner. They could have been twins. This man used to walk to work each day as me and my friends walked to school. As you may know, Schultz' catch-phrase was "I know NOTHING", spoken in a strong German accent and every day this poor guy had to put up with obnoxious kids passing him and muttering " I know NUSSINK." You could tell he knew damn well what was going on, but he would never degrade himself by admitting it :) Sadly I don't think today's "politically correct" climate would smile on a show such as Hogan's heroes, but it IS funny and worth seeing if it's ever shown again.


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