The inmates of a German World War II prisoner of war camp conduct an espionage and sabotage campaign right under the noses of their warders.
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6   5   4   3   2   1  
1971   1970   1969   1968   1967   1966   … See all »
Won 2 Primetime Emmys. Another 11 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
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 Col. Robert E. Hogan (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Col. Wilhelm Klink (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. Hans Georg Schultz / ... (168 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Cpl. Louis LeBeau (167 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Cpl. Peter Newkirk (167 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. Andrew Carter / ... (166 episodes, 1965-1971)
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 Sgt. James 'Kinch' Kinchloe / ... (141 episodes, 1965-1970)
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Storyline

Colonel Hogan leads a ragtag band of POW's caught behind German lines in this popular television comedy. The bumbling Germans give Hogan and his crew plenty of opportunities to sabotage their war efforts. Colonel Klink is more concerned with having everything run smoothly and avoiding any trouble with his superiors (especially anything that might result in his being reassigned and sent to the front) than with being tough on Hogan and his fellow prisoners. Written by Tad Dibbern <DIBBERN_D@a1.mscf.upenn.edu>

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Taglines:

If you liked World War II, you'll love Hogan's Heroes! See more »

Genres:

Comedy | War

Certificate:

TV-PG | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

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Details

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Release Date:

17 September 1965 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Ein Käfig voller Helden  »

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(pilot)|

Aspect Ratio:

4:3
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Despite some coincidental similarities (both have a "Sgt. Schultz" and a somewhat put-upon commandant), Hogan's Heroes (1965) was not inspired by the movie, Stalag 17 (1953), as some may think. See more »

Goofs

The RAF Corporal wears an incorrect cap. The cap he wears is a US style 'Garrison Cap'. He should be wearing a 'forage cap' whilst similar, has different shape and stitching. The garrison cap has 2 buttons on the front, which have been added to make it look like a forage cap. Garrison caps don't have buttons on the front. See more »

Quotes

[Newkirk and Carter are found near the camp fence]
Colonel Klink: Schultz, into the cooler they go. Throw away the key.
Carter: Don't we get a trial or anything?
Colonel Klink: This is Germany. Although I do appreciate your sense of humor.
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Connections

Referenced in Mystery Science Theater 3000: Lost Continent (1990) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

A Show that has lost its context
1 January 2004 | by (N Syracuse NY) – See all my reviews

The problem with Hogan's heroes is that it has lost its context. People criticize it as a comedy set in a German prisoner of War camp, saying that trivializes the real human tragedies created by the Nazi regime. The thing is, Hogan's Heroes is not a spoof of prison camps. It's a spoof of World War II movies and TV shows. It came out in the wake of films like `The Longest Day', `The Great Escape', etc. which produced shows like `Combat', `The Gallant Men', 12 O'Clock High', all of which were hyper serious because of the subject matter. Such a trend requires a leavening spoof. And `Hogan's Heroes' and `McHale's Navy' provided that comic relief. Nobody ever criticized McHale's Navy for trivializing the Pacific War, any more than they criticized `F Troop' for not being a documentary about the Old West or `Get Smart' for not being written by John LaCarre. Why do we indict Hogan's heroes for being insensitive to the deprivations of the Nazis?

This show is itself based on a hit Broadway play and movie from a decade before called `Stalag 17' which won William Holden an Oscar. If you've seen Stalag 17, the humor there is much cruder and more oblivious of the real threat of the Nazis than Hogan's Heroes. Robert Strauss and Harvey Lembeck, (later to show up in another Military spoof to which HH also obviously owes a lot), decide at one point they would like to see some female Russian POWS take showers. They grab a bucket of paint and begin painting a stripe down the middle of the road toward the building where the showers are. This fools the guards until the paint a stripe right over to the window of this building, (the showers have windows?), and peer in. There is nothing this crude or insensitive in any episode of Hogan's Heroes. Yet this is a highly regarded film.

But now, 30 years later, when there are fewer films about that era made, the old show is viewed not a spoof of a show business trend but as a parody of the real event, which it was never really intended to be. This has allowed the critics to `pile on' and rip the show for being insensitive to the victims of Nazi oppression. All I remember is a funny show and that's all it was ever intended to be.


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