IMDb > Zulu (1964)
Zulu
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Zulu (1964) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   25,884 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
John Prebble (original screenplay) and
Cy Endfield (original screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Zulu on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 June 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Dwarfing The Mightiest! Towering Over The Greatest! See more »
Plot:
Outnumbered British soldiers do battle with Zulu warriors at Rorke's Drift. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. See more »
User Reviews:
An edge of your seat spectacular. See more (227 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Cy Endfield 
 
Writing credits
John Prebble (original screenplay) and
Cy Endfield (original screenplay)

John Prebble (suggested by an article written by)

Produced by
Stanley Baker .... producer
Cy Endfield .... producer
Basil Keys .... associate producer
Joseph E. Levine .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
John Barry 
 
Cinematography by
Stephen Dade (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
John Jympson 
 
Art Direction by
Ernest Archer 
 
Makeup Department
Charles E. Parker .... makeup creator (as Charles Parker)
Judy Cadman .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Bob Lawrance .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Richard Mills .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Michael Morris .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
John D. Merriman .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Bert Batt .... assistant director
Robert Porter .... second unit director (as Bob Porter)
Howard Rennie .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Claude Watson .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Dick Frift .... construction manager
Tommy Bacon .... props (uncredited)
Vernon Dixon .... set dresser (uncredited)
John Paterson .... chief carpenter (uncredited)
John Poyner .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Rusty Coppleman .... sound editor
Claude Hitchcock .... sound recordist
J.B. Smith .... sound recordist (as J. B. Smith)
Stephen Dalby .... dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Fred Hughesdon .... sound maintenance (uncredited)
David Jones .... boom operator (uncredited)
Derrick Leather .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Gordon K. McCallum .... stereo dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Ray Palmer .... dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Ray Palmer .... stereo dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Nicholas Stevenson .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
Alan Strachan .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
Eric Tomlinson .... sound recordist: music (uncredited)
Len Walter .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Jimmy Harris .... special effects (uncredited)
Roy Whybrow .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Stunts
John Sullivan .... stunt director
Joe Powell .... stunt arranger (uncredited)
Joe Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
John Sullivan .... stunts (uncredited)
Larry Taylor .... stunts (uncredited)
Robin Webb .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Dudley Lovell .... camera operator
John Arnatt .... gaffer (uncredited)
Brian Ellis .... clapper loader (uncredited)
Norman Gryspeerdt .... still photographer (uncredited)
Peter Hammond .... camera technician (uncredited)
Brian Jones .... focus puller (uncredited)
Bob Martin .... still photographer (uncredited)
F.J. Williams .... grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Arthur Newman .... wardrobe supervisor
Charles Prime .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Jennifer Thompson .... assistant editor
Alan Strachan .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Pamela Tomling .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
John Barry .... conductor
Bobby Graham .... musician: drums (uncredited)
Sidney Margo .... music contractor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Ian Fawn-Meade .... assistant to producers
Joseph E. Levine .... presenter
Douglas Rankin .... production consultant
Muirne Van Wyk .... continuity (as Muirne Mathieson)
Charles Cannon .... production accountant (uncredited)
Joan Dowie Dunn .... production secretary (uncredited)
Geoff Freeman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Marguerite Green .... production secretary (uncredited)
Arthur Hall .... production accountant (uncredited)
Noreen Hipwell .... production secretary (uncredited)
Diana James .... production secretary (uncredited)
Susan Langford .... production secretary (uncredited)
Caroline Murray .... production secretary (uncredited)
Anne Nickson .... on-set nurse (uncredited)
Roy Skeggs .... production accountant (uncredited)
Gillian Stone .... production accountant (uncredited)
Maureen White .... publicity secretary (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi .... the producers of this film are grateful to, and their peoples for their help and co-operation during the making of this film (as Chief Buthelezi of Mahlabatini)
Cyprian Paramount Chief of the Zulus .... the producers of this film are grateful to, and their peoples for their help and co-operation during the making of this film
 
Crew believed to be complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
138 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints) | 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Mono (35 mm optical prints)
Certification:
Australia:M (alternate rating) | Australia:PG (original rating) | Finland:K-8 | Iceland:12 | New Zealand:PG | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG (DVD rating) | Sweden:15 | UK:U (original rating) (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (video rating) (1989) (1993) (2007) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
James Booth's character, Pvt. Henry Hook, was required to be in the field hospital, which were mostly interior shots. Therefore, Booth did not travel with the cast and crew to South Africa for the filming.See more »
Goofs:
Errors in geography: Early scene with soldiers working on dam at the base shows the Drakensberg Amphitheatre in the background. This shot was taken in the upper Tugela river valley, miles away from the actual site of Rorke's Drift.See more »
Quotes:
Bromhead:You mean your only plan is to stand behind a few feet of mealie bags and wait for the attack?See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Men of HarlechSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
162 out of 186 people found the following review useful.
An edge of your seat spectacular., 14 August 2004
Author: Scaramouche2004 from Coventry, England

22nd January 1879, Rorke's Drift. Natal Province. On that day an epic battle was fought between 4000 Zulu warriors and approx. 100 British soldiers.

Now I have noticed many of our American cousins have made remarks in their reviews of Zulu, to the effect that the soldiers were nasty-pasty British Empire builders and that they all deserved to choke on their own vomit, however the film does not try to justify the Zulu War or it's origins so I will not either, suffice it to say that you shouldn't be expressing assumptions and opinions on nineteenth century political attitudes with such an obvious twenty-first century viewpoint. They are two very different worlds which cannot be compared.

This film is beautifully shot and scripted, and the the John Barry musical score keeps the battle scenes moving well. It seems to makes the sometimes long periods of heavy fighting pass by quicker. Barry took authentic Zulu songs and chants and added the dramatic score around them to make an original and haunting theme which still ranks as one of his greatest film score offerings.

Stanley Baker is fantastic as Lt. Chard, the Royal Engineer who is able to use his skill in successfully fortifying the little hospital outpost against the onslaught of the foe.

Micheal Caine plays Lt. Bromhead the professional line soldier and upper class officer who after a little whining and grumbling accepts his position of second in command and fights valiantly in the battle. It was this film that propelled Caine to international stardom, so powerful was his performance.

Other noted cast members include James Booth as an excellent but inaccurate Hook, and Nigel Green as Colour-Sergeant Frank Bourne the typical Victorian Sergeant-major complete with side whiskers and moustache.

The Great Jack Hawkins who did not like the character he played or his work on the film, portrayed Otto Witt, the pacifist missionary with a drink problem and again it is another performance worthy of an award. It was upsetting however to hear in his voice, his wonderfully clipped speaking voice, the early effects of the throat cancer which had by this time plagued him for three years and which was eventually to lead to his death.

Also special mention to Richard Burton, who narrated the whole show. He truly had one of the best dramatic voices in the world and speaks his lines beautifully.

It was also good to see the Zulu's portrayed with dignity and honour rather than just mere savages with bones through their noses. They were a brave and strong opponent that day and they are deserving of tribute as much as the British.

The basis of this film is taken from historical fact, although certain characters and events have either been altered, erased or just plain fabricated for dramatic purposes. I hope that should any producers in the future be foolish enough to attempt a remake of this classic epic, they will put historical accuracy first and Hollywood sensationalism second if at all.

Enough has been said by others regarding the blatant slander of Private Henry Hook, so I will not elaborate on it, save that it was a gross slur on the bravest of men. I hope should the film ever be remade his honour will be restored and his gallant deeds on that day be portrayed accurately.

To quash further popular myths none of the film is shot on the exact spot at which the battle took place, (the real Rorke's Drift was in fact about 60 miles from the location shoot.)

The regiment in question did not become the South Wales Borderers until two years after the battle and was at the time a Warwickshire Regiment. They were however based in Brecon which is where the Welsh connection was born and would explain why there was a higher amount of Welsh nationals attached to it.

Despite this the regiment consisted mainly of Englishmen and only about 12 percent were in fact from Wales. With these demographics being how they are I can assure you, "Men of Harlech" would not have been sung at Rorke's Drift, (at least not without the culprit being bayoneted by an Englishman with ear-ache.)

Lt. Chard himself was an Englishman having been born in Plymouth into an established and respected Somerset family. This being the case, I find it funny that although Stanley Baker never refers to Chard as a Welshman, he none the less seems to revel in promoting Welsh pride at ever opportunity. Of the eleven V.C's won in the battle, only three of them were awarded to Welshman so why the big Welsh message Boyo?

Also the final salute made by the Zulu's did not occur. When they re-appeared on the hill they returned with the sole intention of finishing off the gallant soldiers at the outpost, but decided against it when they noticed a sizable relief column approaching Rorke's Drift from the south.

Finally, a few people have made references to Colour-Sergeant Frank Bourne, wondering whether or not he really existed and if so why he was never awarded the V.C. for his conduct on the day. Yes, he really existed and yes, he did fight at Rorke's Drift. He was in fact recommended for a Victoria Cross, but told the powers that be that he would rather have a promotion instead. This he was given along with a D.C.M and an O.B.E. He was the last surviving veteran of Rorke's Drift when he died on V.E. Day 8th May 1945 aged 91 and with a rank of Lt. Col.

For more historic information about The Battle of Rorke's Drift and it's combatants, I recommend you visit www.rorkesdriftvc.com.

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