IMDb > Zulu (1964)
Zulu
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Zulu (1964) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   25,511 votes »
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Up 5% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
John Prebble (original screenplay) and
Cy Endfield (original screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Zulu on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 June 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Dwarfing The Mightiest! Towering Over The Greatest! See more »
Plot:
Outnumbered British soldiers do battle with Zulu warriors at Rorke's Drift. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for BAFTA Film Award. See more »
NewsDesk:
(65 articles)
User Reviews:
Cymru Am Byth in South Africa See more (227 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Stanley Baker ... Lt. John Chard R.E.

Jack Hawkins ... Otto Witt

Ulla Jacobsson ... Margareta Witt
James Booth ... Pvt. Henry Hook

Michael Caine ... Lt. Gonville Bromhead

Nigel Green ... Colour-Sgt. Bourne
Ivor Emmanuel ... Pvt. Owen
Paul Daneman ... Sgt. Maxfield
Glynn Edwards ... Cpl. Allen
Neil McCarthy ... Pvt. Thomas
David Kernan ... Pvt. Hitch
Gary Bond ... Pvt. Cole
Peter Gill ... Pvt. 612 Williams
Tom Gerrard ... Lance Corporal
Patrick Magee ... Surgeon Reynolds
Richard Davies ... Pvt. 593 Jones
Denys Graham ... Pvt. 716 Jones
Dafydd Havard ... Gunner Howarth
Dickie Owen ... Cpl. Schiess
Larry Taylor ... Hughes
Joe Powell ... Sgt. Windridge
John Sullivan ... Stephenson
Harvey Hall ... Sick Man
Gert van den Bergh ... Adendorff (as Gert Van Den Bergh)
Dennis Folbigge ... Commissary Dalton
Kerry Jordan ... Company Cook
Ronald Hill ... Bugler
Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi ... Cetewayo (as Chief Buthelezi)
Daniel Tshabalala ... Jacob
Ephraim Mbhele ... Red Garters
Simon Sabela ... Dance Leader

Richard Burton ... Narrator (voice)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Michael Bishop ... Orderly (uncredited)

Directed by
Cy Endfield 
 
Writing credits
John Prebble (original screenplay) and
Cy Endfield (original screenplay)

John Prebble (suggested by an article written by)

Produced by
Stanley Baker .... producer
Cy Endfield .... producer
Basil Keys .... associate producer
Joseph E. Levine .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
John Barry 
 
Cinematography by
Stephen Dade (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
John Jympson 
 
Art Direction by
Ernest Archer 
 
Makeup Department
Charles E. Parker .... makeup creator (as Charles Parker)
Judy Cadman .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Bob Lawrance .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Richard Mills .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Michael Morris .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
John D. Merriman .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Bert Batt .... assistant director
Robert Porter .... second unit director (as Bob Porter)
Howard Rennie .... third assistant director (uncredited)
Claude Watson .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Dick Frift .... construction manager
Tommy Bacon .... props (uncredited)
Vernon Dixon .... set dresser (uncredited)
John Paterson .... chief carpenter (uncredited)
John Poyner .... property master (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Rusty Coppleman .... sound editor
Claude Hitchcock .... sound recordist
J.B. Smith .... sound recordist
Stephen Dalby .... dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Fred Hughesdon .... sound maintenance (uncredited)
David Jones .... boom operator (uncredited)
Derrick Leather .... sound camera operator (uncredited)
Gordon K. McCallum .... stereo dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Ray Palmer .... dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Ray Palmer .... stereo dubbing mixer (uncredited)
Nicholas Stevenson .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
Alan Strachan .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
Eric Tomlinson .... sound recordist: music (uncredited)
Len Walter .... assistant sound editor (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Jimmy Harris .... special effects (uncredited)
Roy Whybrow .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Stunts
John Sullivan .... stunt director
Joe Powell .... stunt arranger (uncredited)
Joe Powell .... stunts (uncredited)
John Sullivan .... stunts (uncredited)
Larry Taylor .... stunts (uncredited)
Robin Webb .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Dudley Lovell .... camera operator
John Arnatt .... gaffer (uncredited)
Brian Ellis .... clapper loader (uncredited)
Norman Gryspeerdt .... still photographer (uncredited)
Peter Hammond .... camera technician (uncredited)
Brian Jones .... focus puller (uncredited)
Bob Martin .... still photographer (uncredited)
F.J. Williams .... grip (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Arthur Newman .... wardrobe supervisor
Charles Prime .... wardrobe assistant (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Jennifer Thompson .... assistant editor
Alan Strachan .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Pamela Tomling .... assistant editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
John Barry .... conductor
Bobby Graham .... musician: drums (uncredited)
Sidney Margo .... music contractor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Ian Fawn-Meade .... assistant to producers
Joseph E. Levine .... presenter
Douglas Rankin .... production consultant
Muirne Van Wyk .... continuity (as Muirne Mathieson)
Charles Cannon .... production accountant (uncredited)
Joan Dowie Dunn .... production secretary (uncredited)
Geoff Freeman .... unit publicist (uncredited)
Marguerite Green .... production secretary (uncredited)
Arthur Hall .... production accountant (uncredited)
Noreen Hipwell .... production secretary (uncredited)
Diana James .... production secretary (uncredited)
Susan Langford .... production secretary (uncredited)
Caroline Murray .... production secretary (uncredited)
Anne Nickson .... on-set nurse (uncredited)
Roy Skeggs .... production accountant (uncredited)
Gillian Stone .... production accountant (uncredited)
Maureen White .... publicity secretary (uncredited)
 
Thanks
Chief Mangosuthu Buthelezi .... the producers of this film are grateful to, and their peoples for their help and co-operation during the making of this film (as Chief Buthelezi of Mahlabatini)
Cyprian Paramount Chief of the Zulus .... the producers of this film are grateful to, and their peoples for their help and co-operation during the making of this film
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
138 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
4-Track Stereo (35 mm magnetic prints) | 70 mm 6-Track (70 mm prints) | Mono (35 mm optical prints)
Certification:
Australia:M (alternate rating) | Australia:PG (original rating) | Finland:K-8 | Iceland:12 | New Zealand:PG | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG (DVD rating) | Sweden:15 | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) (1989) (1993) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:16

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Commissary Dalton was in no way the upper class twit he comes across in the film. In fact, he was the most experienced soldier there. Also Dalton played a major part in the defense and battle plans of the garrison. Chard and Bromhard would turn to him for advice on many issues.See more »
Goofs:
Anachronisms: Set in 1879, several Zulu warriors are wearing wrist watches, probably the same ones that the production company paid the extras with.See more »
Quotes:
Sergeant Windridge:Owen!
Pte. Owen:Yes, Sergeant?
Sergeant Windridge:You've got a voice haven't you?
Pte. Owen:Yes, baritone, Sergeant.
Sergeant Windridge:Well get up on that hill and sing out if you see anything. You too. And take your bandook, you dozy welshman!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in The Making of 'The Italian Job' (2003) (V)See more »
Soundtrack:
Men of HarlechSee more »

FAQ

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76 out of 91 people found the following review useful.
Cymru Am Byth in South Africa, 30 December 2004
Author: juho69 (ianrholt@yahoo.co.uk) from Gidea Park, England

If you watch only the first two minutes of 'Zulu', it will be worth your while. The superbly dramatic theme music, followed immediately by Richard Burton's striking Welsh narration, are utterly entrancing. The rest of the film is not bad, either!

In January 1879, during the Boer War, at Isandhlwana in South Africa, over one thousand British troops are annihilated by King Cetshwayo's Zulu army. Standing between the four thousand Zulus and victory is the mission station at Rorke's Drift and about one hundred and forty British soldiers, some of whom are wounded. Commanding the military operation is the young Lieutenant John Chard (Stanley Baker, also co-producer of the film) with Lieutenant Gonville Bromhead (Michael Caine, in his first major film role). Against the unimaginable odds, the British troops - the B Company of the 24th Regiment of Foot, South Wales Borderers - manage, with exceptional courage and stoicism, to hold off the Zulu attacks until morning. The valour of the men defending Rourke's Drift resulted in the awarding of eleven Victoria Crosses. The roll of honour is recited by Richard Burton at the film's end.

Baker and Caine are very convincing in the two lead roles as Chard and Bromhead, the rival lieutenants from different social classes who come to respect and even like each other. Their first meeting emphasises the psychological as well as the physical distance between them. Chard, the Engineer Officer, in his shirt-sleeves, is up to his waist in water; Bromhead, the upper-class blue-blood, in his helmet and fine cloak, is on horseback, having just returned from hunting. However, as the battle progresses, this rivalry is forgotten as their prime concern is the job in hand. Their exchange when Chard is injured and Bromhead goes to his aid is telling. By the end of the film, as they stand together in the burnt-out ruins of the hospital, they are equals.

The incredibly virile Stanley Baker (one wants to say, "Fwhoar!" every time he appears on screen) co-produced the film because, like most Welshmen, he was extremely patriotic and wanted to publicise the bravery of the Welsh soldiers at Rorke's Drift. Michael Caine auditioned originally for the part of Hook but was offered instead the part of Bromhead as his looks were considered more suited to those of an upper-class officer than a Cockney private.

Good support is given by the other actors in the supporting roles. James Booth as Private Henry Hook is probably the most memorable character, portrayed (historically inaccurately) as the company ne'er-do-well, yet who wakes up to his duty at the moment of crisis and fights almost to the death. Jack Hawkins and Ulla Jacobssen are effective as the well-meaning but naive father-and-daughter missionaries, the Witts. The outstanding bravery and selflessness of the other (mainly) Welsh soldiers is brought out by all the actors in the subordinate roles.

What I think is very admirable about 'Zulu' is its lack of jingoism. Far from it crowing about British supremacy over the natives, it portrays the bravery of the Zulus as equal to or even greater than that of the British. At the end of the battle, there is no great rejoicing; it was just a job which had to be done because they were there. In the ruins of the hospital, when Chard asks Bromhead how he feels, Bromhead replies, "Sick." Their dialogue continues:

Bromhead: There's something else. I feel ashamed. Was that how it was for you? The first time?

Chard: First time? Do you think I could stand this butcher's yard more than once?

Bromhead: I didn't know.

Chard: I told you. I came up here to build a bridge.

No more needs to be said.

Although the character names and events are factual, the film does sometimes sacrifice historical accuracy for dramatic effect. How much real rivalry there was between Chard and Bromhead is unclear - although it is true that Bromhead ceded command to Chard. Private Hook was not the thief and ne'er-do-well as played by James Booth. Colour Sergeant Bourne was a short man and quite unlike Nigel Green in appearance. Most of the Victoria Cross winners were English, not Welsh. And the film itself was shot not at Rorke's Drift but at a location some miles away.

Interestingly, neither Chard nor Bromhead lived to a great age. Both died in their forties, Chard of mouth cancer in 1897 and Bromhead of fever on active service a few years before. Neither ever married. Nevertheless, their names are immortalised in 'Zulu' - as are the deeds of the tremendously brave men, Welsh, English and Zulu, at Rorke's Drift on 22nd/23rd January 1879.

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