Topkapi (1964) - News Poster

(1964)

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Phaedra

Or, “Never on Sunday with Your Stepson.” Director Jules Dassin’s monument to his beloved Melina Mercouri transposes a Greek tragedy to a modern setting. The pampered wife of a shipping magnate is like a queen of old — she can fling a priceless gem into the Thames on just a whim, and she goes in whatever direction her heart takes her. When her attractive stepson Anthony Perkins enters the picture, there will be Hell to Pay.

Phaedra

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1962 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 116 min. / Street Date March 21, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.95

Starring: Melina Mercouri, Anthony Perkins, Raf Vallone, Elisabeth Ercy.

Cinematography: Jacquest Natteau

Film Editor: Roger Dwyre

Original Music: Mikis Theodorakis

Written by Jules Dassin, Margarita Lymberaki from the play Hippolytus by Euripides

Produced and Directed by Jules Dassin

Anyone into amour fou, the romantic notion of a love without limits, beyond the harsh constraints of reality?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Noir Takes a Holiday: Close-Up on Jules Dassin's "The Law"

  • MUBI
Close-Up is a column that spotlights films now playing on Mubi. The Law is playing on Mubi in the Us through January 21, 2016.For those who like nice touches, keep your eye on the bird. In Jules Dassin's The Law (1959), it's the first character we meet, where, in a town square under the hot Mediterranean sun, a group of men are watching a pigeon. The men are out of work and squarely at the bottom of the socioeconomic totem pole. The pigeon is an idiot, one man says—why would anything that could fly choose to stay here? Because sometimes people throw it crumbs, a man answers. And if you had any doubts what this all symbolizes, another of the men hastily adds: just like us. This is a film very much about hierarchy, and the forces or illusions that keep everyone in their place. The air is soon
See full article at MUBI »

Daily | Akerman, Welles, Ballhaus

The new issue of Necsus features an interview with Eric de Kuyper, who worked with Chantal Akerman for decades, and audiovisual essays on Monica Vitti and Jules Dassin's Topkapi. Also in today's roundup: Simon Callow and Alex Ross on Orson Welles, Carlotta Films co-founder Vincent Paul-Boncour on Jacques Rivette's Out 1, and a big New York magazine cover package on Adam McKay's The Big Short featuring interviews with Christian Bale, Steve Carell, Ryan Gosling, Brad Pitt and Michael Lewis, author of the bestselling book. And the Berlinale will present an Honorary Golden Bear and an Homage series to cinematographer Michael Ballhaus, best known for his work with Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Martin Scorsese. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Jules Dassin Classic “Rififi” To Premiere In New Dcp Version At Laemmle's Royal In L.A., September 4

  • CinemaRetro
Rialto Pictures will beloved French heist film Rififi by director Jules Dassin, for the first time on Dcp, at Los Angeles' Laemmle Royal, for one week beginning Friday, September 4.

Jules Dassin (1911 - 2008) began his filmmaking career in the early 1940s and is known for his hits Brute Force (1947), The Naked City (1948), and Thieves' Highway (1949). His career later took a hit when he was blacklisted for Communist activities during the McCarthy Era. Dassin's move to France helped revive his career and was the setting for the hit film Rififi that set his career in motion once again. After the film's successful French release, Dassin was awarded the directing prize at Cannes which allowed Rififi to be released in the U.S. where it enjoyed a successful art house run. Rififi is renowned for being one of the early 'heist' films and served as an inspiration for later films in the genre.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

British Film Noir Collection | DVD Review

In a novel effort to stress that film noir wasn’t a film movement specifically an output solely produced for American audiences, Kino Lorber releases a five disc set of obscure noir examples released in the UK. Spanning a near ten year period from 1943 to 1952, the titles displayed here do seem to chart a progression in tone, at least resulting in parallels with American counterparts. Though a couple of the selections here aren’t very noteworthy, either as artifacts of British noir or items worthy of reappraisal, it does contain items of considerable interest, including rare titles from forgotten or underrated auteurs like Ronald Neame, Roy Ward Baker, and Ralph Thomas.

They Met in the Dark

The earliest title in this collection is a 1943 title from Karel Lamac, They Met in the Dark, a pseudo-comedy noir that barely meets the criteria. Based on a novel by Anthony Gilbert (whose novel
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Watch: Dissection of Director Influence Over the 'Mission: Impossible' Franchise

Sean Witzke has put together the following video essay exploring the work of Brian De Palma, John Woo, J.J. Abrams and Brad Bird over the Mission: Impossible franchise and it's a fascinating study of influence from a director's perspective and what has come of the franchise, primarily following Abrams' taking over ever since Mission: Impossible III. Witzke spends a ton of time exploring De Palma's contributions and influences when it comes to Mission: Impossible (1996) and as he moves on the time spent on each film decreases, which is interesting in and of itself. Talk of the influence of Alfred Hitchcock on all the films, as well as Ronald Neame's Gambit, Jules Dassin's Topkapi (which I have not seen, but desperately need to) and Roman Polanski's Macbeth are all referenced and he also discusses, as I have before, the fact Woo's Mission: Impossible II is essentially a
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

London Stage Star and Olivier Henry V Leading Lady Asherson Dead at Age 99

'Henry V' Movie Actress Renée Asherson dead at 99: Laurence Olivier leading lady in acclaimed 1944 film (image: Renée Asherson and Laurence Olivier in 'Henry V') Renée Asherson, a British stage actress featured in London productions of A Streetcar Named Desire and Three Sisters, but best known internationally as Laurence Olivier's leading lady in the 1944 film version of Henry V, died on October 30, 2014. Asherson was 99 years old. The exact cause of death hasn't been specified. She was born Dorothy Renée Ascherson (she would drop the "c" some time after becoming an actress) on May 19, 1915, in Kensington, London, to Jewish parents: businessman Charles Ascherson and his second wife, Dorothy Wiseman -- both of whom narrowly escaped spending their honeymoon aboard the Titanic. (Ascherson cancelled the voyage after suffering an attack of appendicitis.) According to Michael Coveney's The Guardian obit for the actress, Renée Asherson was "scantly
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Maximilian Schell obituary

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Maximilian Schell obituary

Actor and director who brought dark good looks and a commanding presence to his roles

Austrian by birth, Swiss by circumstance and international by reputation, Maximilian Schell, who has died aged 83, was a distinguished actor, director, writer and producer. However, he will be best remembered as an actor, especially for his Oscar-winning performance in Stanley Kramer's Judgment at Nuremberg (1961) – an early highlight among scores of television and movie appearances. He also directed opera, worked tirelessly in the theatre and made six feature films, including Marlene (1984) - a tantalising portrait of Dietrich, his co-star in Judgment, who is heard being interviewed but not seen, except in movie extracts.

Schell courted controversy and much of his work, including The Pedestrian (1973), dealt with the second world war, its attendant crimes and the notion of collective guilt. In 1990, when he was offered a special award for his contributions to German film, he refused to accept it.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Earliest Best Actor Oscar Winner Has Died

Maximilian Schell dead at 83: Best Actor Oscar winner for ‘Judgment at Nuremberg’ (photo: Maximilian Schell ca. 1960) Actor and filmmaker Maximilian Schell, best known for his Oscar-winning performance as the defense attorney in Stanley Kramer’s 1961 political drama Judgment at Nuremberg died at a hospital in Innsbruck, Austria, on February 1, 2014. According to his agent, Patricia Baumbauer, Schell died overnight following a "sudden and serious illness." Maximilian Schell was 83. Born on December 8, 1930, in Vienna, Maximilian Schell was the younger brother of future actor Carl Schell and Maria Schell, who would become an international film star in the 1950s (The Last Bridge, Gervaise, The Hanging Tree). Immy Schell, who would be featured in several television and film productions from the mid-’50s to the early ’90s, was born in 1935. Following Nazi Germany’s annexation of Austria in 1938, Schell’s parents, Swiss playwright Hermann Ferdinand Schell and Austrian stage actress Margarete Schell Noé,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

R.I.P. Maximilian Schell (1930-2014), Watch The Actor Accept His Oscar & Golden Globe Awards

Hollywood has lost a legend today, with Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell passing away at 83 years old. While the actor's film debut came opposite Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift in "The Young Lions," it would be his performance in his second movie that would bring him worldwide attention. As the only actor brought over from the Playhouse 90 TV production of "Judgment At Nuremberg" to the feature film version directed by Stanley Kramer, Schell's turn in the iconic film as the defense attorney landed him an Oscar win (he would be nominated twice more for "The Man In The Glass Booth" in 1975 and "Julia" in 1977) and from there, he didn't look back. The actor's work, which spanned both feature films and television, found him appearing in a wide range of roles, including everything from "The Odessa File" and "Topkapi," to "John Carpenter's Vampires" and "Deep Impact," to working with newer auteurs
See full article at The Playlist »

Will this be third time in Oscar history that all four acting winners are foreign born?

Will this be third time in Oscar history that all four acting winners are foreign born?
Since the Oscars introduced the supporting awards at the 9th annual ceremony in 1936, there have been only two years when all four acting winners hailed from outside the United States. The first was back in 1964 when the winners were three Brits -- Rex Harrison ("My Fair Lady"), Julie Andrews ("Mary Poppins") and Peter Ustinov ("Topkapi") --  and Russian-born Lila Kedrova ("Zorba the Greek"). And the second came at the 80th ceremony in 2007, when two Brits -- Daniel Day-Lewis ("There Will Be Blood") and Tilda Swinton ("Michael Clayton") -- were joined by Marion Cotillard ("La Vie en Rose"), who made Oscar history by giving the first French language performance to be so honored, and Javier Bardem ("No Country for Old Men"), the first Spanish actor to win an Oscar. Could this year mark the third time that happens? Australian Cate Blanchett ("Blue...
See full article at Gold Derby »

‘Harry Potter’ Star Bonnie Wright Cast in Stage Debut

Harry Potter’s girlfriend is all grown up! Bonnie Wright, best known for playing Ginny Weasley in the Harry Potter franchise, has announced she will be making her stage debut in London next month.

Wright will be playing the role of ‘The Girl‘ in Peter Ustinov’s ‘The Moment of Truth‘ in the play’s first revival since 1951. The play is being revived by the New Actors Company as they continue their commitment to bringing forgotten theatre back to the stage. Here’s what to expect:

‘A republic is poised to fall. The only remaining members of an unpopular government are its cynical Prime Minister and a naïve, emotional Foreign Secretary. The invading army has it’s boots upon the soil of this crumbling nation. Inside the cabinet office, toy soldiers and old icons of military glory veil the realities of war and bloodshed. Death, in a moment of truth was never so real’.

Ustinov,
See full article at The Hollywood News »

Christoph Waltz and Quentin Tarantino make Oscars history with 'Django Unchained' wins

Christoph Waltz and Quentin Tarantino make Oscars history with 'Django Unchained' wins
Both of the Oscars wins for "Django Unchained" --  Christoph Waltz (Best Supporting Actor) and Quentin Tarantino (Best Original Screenplay) -- are history making.  Waltz, who claimed this same award three years ago for "Inglorious Basterds," his first collaboration with Tarantino, is the seventh actor to win more than once in this category, following: Walter Brennan: "Come and Get It" (1936), "Kentucky" (1938), "The Westerner" (1940);   Anthony Quinn: "Viva Zapata!" (1952), "Lust for Life" (1956);   Peter Ustinov: "Spartacus" (1960), "Topkapi" (1964);   Jason Robards: "All the President's Men" (1976), "Julia" (1977);   Melvyn Douglas: "Hud" (1963), "Being There" (1979); and   Michael Caine: "Hannah and Her Sisters" (1986...
See full article at Gold Derby »

The Forgotten: Crime of Passion

  • MUBI
Jules Dassin had established himself as a very capable, smart genre filmmaker in Hollywood by the time the blacklist kicked him out. In Britain, he made Night and the City (1950), which continued his winning streak, and in France Rififi (1955) not only anticipated the direction Jean-Pierre Melville's career was about to take (translating American crime movie tropes to the French idiom), it spawned a whole sub-genre of unofficial sequels. Dassin's own Topkapi (1964) was a colorful spoof of the heist movie.

But the other strand of Dassin's European filmmaking is not so popular: his attempts at being an arthouse director have inspired considerable derision: David Thomson recommends The Law, Phaedra and 10:30 P.M. Summer as cures for suicidal depression; their earnestness strikes him as irresistibly preposterous.

Well, I can resist the temptation to laugh, up to a point: Anthony Perkins' torrid love scene with Dassin's wife, Melina Mercouri, in
See full article at MUBI »

Eight Counts of Grand Theft Cinema

We love crime movies. We may go on and on about Scorsese’s ability to incorporate Italian neo-realism techniques into Mean Streets (1973), the place of John Huston’s The Asphalt Jungle (1950) in the canon of postwar noir, The Godfather (1972) as a socio-cultural commentary on the distortion of the ideals of the American dream blah blah blah, yadda yadda yadda…but that ain’t it.

We love crime movies because we love watching a guy who doesn’t have to behave, who doesn’t have to – nor care to – put a choker on his id and can let his darkest, most visceral impulses run wild. Some smart-mouth gopher tells hood Tommy DeVito (Joe Pesci), “Go fuck yourself,” in Scorsese’s Goodfellas (1990), and does Tommy roll with it? Does he spit back, “Fuck me? Nah, fuck you!” Does he go home and tell his mother?

Nope.

He pulls a .45 cannon out from
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Win Go to Blazes on DVD

  • HeyUGuys
To mark the release of Go to Blazes on DVD this Monday, 6th February, Studio Canal have given us three copies of the class movie to give away. The movie was originally released in 1962, is directed by Michael Truman and stars Maggie Smith, Dave King, Robert Morley and Daniel Massey.

For anyone who loves British comedy, Go To Blazes features an all-star cast that includes Robert Morley (The African Queen, Topkapi), Daniel Massey (In Which We Serve, The Entertainer), Dennis Price (Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Rebel) and Coral Browne (Auntie Mame, Theatre of Blood).  Go To Blazes also features classic British character actors Norman Rossington (The Wrong Box, The Charge of the Light Brigade), Finlay Currie (Around The World in Eighty Days, Ben Hur) and Miles Malleson (The Importance of Being Earnest, The Man In The White Suit). And last but not least, Go To Blazes stars Dame Maggie Smith
See full article at HeyUGuys »

10 of the best films set in Istanbul

From Turkish versions of Tarzan and Dracula to wintry weepies, via (whisper it) Midnight Express, Fiachra Gibbons picks out the best films shot in Istanbul

• As featured in our Istanbul city guide

From Russia with Love, Terence Young, 1963

"They dance for him, they yearn for him, they die for him …" From Russia with Love is not only arguably the best of the Bond films, it set the template for all that followed, right down to the corny one-liners. This is Tatiana, the Russian double-agent love interest succumbing to Sean Connery's charms: "The mechanism is… Oh James… Will you make love to me all the time in England?" "Day and night, darling… Go on about the mechanism…" The film was shot when the city's population was less than two million (it has mushroomed to more than 13 million today), and it's a magic carpet ride back to a time when Istanbul teemed with hamals,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Big Brother Recap: Zing for the Moment

Big Brother Recap: Zing for the Moment
Yes, yes, we’ll get to the freakish results of the Power Of Veto competition in a short spell, but wait: Did Big Brother just bring back Zingbot 3000, the wisecracking robot who enters the manse for no reason, hurls insults at the remaining houseguests, and proclaims “Zing” after each punchline? Well, I’ll be: It’s the most human advancement of the season! Forget this dreary episode and the humiliating P.O.V. aftermath — we just watched these eight comatose bodies jolt to life thanks to the power of mockery. Lesson learned: We do God’s work when we call Rachel a braying hyena demon.
See full article at TVLine.com »

Today’s Special: Tax day heist movie quiz

Is the IRS making you feel a poorer? As today is tax day, Disc Dish is celebrating with some great films in which characters use not-so-legal ways to fill their wallets (not that we’re advocating any, but they’re so much fun to watch.)

The question is, how well do you know your cinematic capers? Below are some of the best heist movies.

How many film titles can you match with the prize the characters are trying to steal? If you get tripped up, steal a peak at the answers.

The Movie The Loot 1. Larceny, Inc. (1942) – Ex-cons J. Chalmers Maxwell (Edward G. Robinson), Jug Martin (Broderick Crawford) and Weepy Davis (Edward Brophy) launch an elaborate scheme to get to this enticing jackpot. But there’s one problem – the fake luggage shop they set up to mask their criminal goings-on is doing a booming business and taking them away from the task at hand.
See full article at Disc Dish »
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