The Secret Invasion (1964) - News Poster

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Play Dirty

In a war film, what’s the difference between nasty exploitation and just plain honest reportage? André De Toth made tough-minded action films with the best of them, and this nail-biting commando mission with Michael Caine and Nigel Davenport is simply superb, one of those great action pictures that’s not widely screened. To its credit it’s not ‘feel good’ enough to be suitable for Memorial Day TV marathons.

Play Dirty

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1968 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date October 17, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Michael Caine, Nigel Davenport, Nigel Green, Harry Andrews.

Cinematography: Edward Scaife

Film Editor: Jack Slade

Art Direction: Tom Morahan, Maurice Pelling

Original Music: Michel Legrand

Written by Lotte Colin, Melvyn Bragg, from a story by George Marton

Produced by Harry Saltzman

Directed by André De Toth

Some movies that were ignored when new now seem far more important, perhaps due to the tenor of times.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Blood Bath

This four-feature set is the weirdest cinematic treasure box of the year, a sort of anti-matter film school. Three of the films are derived from a single Yugoslavian picture rejected by Roger Corman. His acolytes Jack Hill and Stephanie Rothman proceeded to add serial killings, supernatural hauntings, a goofy vampire, and an ending that could be called 'Zombies In The Wax Museum.' Tim Lucas tells the whole story in a fascinating feature-length extra docu. Blood Bath Blu-ray Arrow Video (USA) 1963 - 1966 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 95 - 81 - 62 - 75 min. / 2-Disc Limited Edition / Street Date May 30, 2016 / 49.95 Starring William Campbell, Patrick Magee, Rade Marcovic, Miha Baloh, Irena Prosen; Marissa Mathes, Linda Saunders, Sandra Knight, Carl Schanzer, Biff Elliot, Sid Haig, Jonathan Haze. Cinematography Nenad Jovicic, Dan Telford, Alfred Taylor. Original Music Bojan Adamic, Ronald Stein, Written by Vlasta Radovanovic, Vic Webber, Jack Hill & Stephanie Rothman Directed by Rados Novakovic, Michael Roy,
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Young Justice Showrunners On The Final Episodes

On the show's remaining episodes in Season 2. Vietti: We had kind of broken the 20 episodes of this season into two parts. The first ten was still familiar to a lot of people in that we had our team operating out of a headquarters and investigating what appeared to be a secret invasion. There's some stability in that and some familiarity. I think our goal for the last ten was to really shake things up. We took their headquarters away from them. The secret invasion is no longer a secret, and in fact, public sentiment is turning away from the heroes in the last ten. Our heroes are more or less on the run. They're no longer the ones starting from a place of power. They searching for a way to get their power back in a lot of ways. So I think that "on the run" feel was a vibe
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Ten Terrific War Movies You Probably Never Heard Of

  • SoundOnSight
I’ve always been a war film buff, maybe because I grew up with them at a time when they were a regular part of the cinema landscape. That’s why I read, with particular interest, my Sound on Sight colleague Edgar Chaput’s recent pieces on The Flowers of War (“The Flowers of War Is an Uneven but Interesting Chinese Ww II Film” – posted 2/20/12) and The Front Line (The Front Line Rises to the Occasion to Overcome Its Familiarity” – 2/16/12) with such interest. An even more fun read was the back-and-forth between Edgar and Sos’s Michael Ryan over the latter (“The Sound on Sight Debate on Korea’s The Front Line” – 2/12/12), with Michael unimpressed because the movie had “…nothing new to add to the war genre,” and Edgar coming back with “…‘new’ is not always what a film must strive for. So long as it does well what it set out to do…
See full article at SoundOnSight »

William Campbell obituary

American actor known for his roles in horror films and Star Trek

The actor William Campbell, who has died aged 87, had a long and varied career in films and on television, finding recognition from his association with several low-budget horror pictures and with the TV sci-fi series Star Trek. However, although he had the hooded eyes and languid manner of Robert Mitchum and something of the laid-back anarchism of Jack Nicholson, entry into the major league of stardom eluded him.

Campbell was in the first series of Star Trek, in an episode entitled The Squire of Gothos (1967), in which he has a field day as General Trelane, a foppish, childish humanoid, swinging wildly from joviality to sulkiness to anger. In The Trouble With Tribbles (1967), in the second season, Campbell was equally impressive as Koloth, a bearded, bureaucratic Klingon, a character that he revived 27 years later, towards the end of his working life,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

William Campbell obituary

American actor known for his roles in horror films and Star Trek

The actor William Campbell, who has died aged 87, had a long and varied career in films and on television, finding recognition from his association with several low-budget horror pictures and with the TV sci-fi series Star Trek. However, although he had the hooded eyes and languid manner of Robert Mitchum and something of the laid-back anarchism of Jack Nicholson, entry into the major league of stardom eluded him.

Campbell was in the first series of Star Trek, in an episode entitled The Squire of Gothos (1967), in which he has a field day as General Trelane, a foppish, childish humanoid, swinging wildly from joviality to sulkiness to anger. In The Trouble With Tribbles (1967), in the second season, Campbell was equally impressive as Koloth, a bearded, bureaucratic Klingon, a character that he revived 27 years later, towards the end of his working life,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Ed Neumeier on "The Dirty Dozen"

The biggest boxoffice hit of 1967 led to scores of imitations, remakes and sequels. Robert Aldrich's brutal action film was highly criticized at the time for its excessive violence and general air of nihilism, but has remained an audience favorite through the decades. Yet Roger Corman got there first with a more modest version of the same story, The Secret Invasion (1964).
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

"Spider-Woman's Tangled Web"

  • SneakPeek
From the team of Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev, the first episode of Marvel's "Spider-Woman" Motion Comic will make your skin crawl as ''Jessica Drew' aka 'Spider-Woman' "...rediscovers her life in a world she did not make. The Secret Invasion is over. Now comes the reckoning..."

Marvel first published 'Spider-Woman' comic books in 1978, a second series in 1993 and a third run in 1999.

The current series, featuring 'Jessica Drew', the original Spider-Woman, debuted November 2009.

A 16-episode "Spider-Woman" animated TV series was produced by DePatie-Freleng Enterprises and Marvel Comics Animation for ABC in 1979.

In that series 'Jessica Drew' (Joan Van Ark) was bitten by a poisonous spider, then injected with an experimental 'spider serum', granting her 'superhuman' powers.

Sneak Peek "Spider-Woman"...
See full article at SneakPeek »

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