8.0/10
372
14 user 21 critic

Point of Order! (1964)

Not Rated | | Documentary | 14 January 1964 (USA)
Point of Order is compiled from TV footage of the 1954 Army-McCarthy hearings, in which the Army accused Senator McCarthy of improperly pressuring the Army for special privileges for ... See full summary »

Director:

Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

1 win. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Documentary | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.7/10 X  

Produced at the height of the Vietnam War, Emile de Antonio's Oscar-nominated 1968 documentary chronicles the war's historical roots. With palpable outrage, De Antonio (Point of Order, ... See full summary »

Director: Emile de Antonio
Stars: Harry S. Ashmore, Daniel Berrigan, Joseph Buttinger
Seven Up! (TV Short 1964)
Documentary | Short | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.1/10 X  

A group of seven-year-old British children from widely ranging backgrounds are interviewed about a range of subjects. Director Michael Apted plans to reinterview them at seven-year ... See full summary »

Director: Paul Almond
Stars: Douglas Keay, Bruce Balden, Jacqueline Bassett
Documentary
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

The definitive documentary on the New York School Painters. Featuring footage of all the major figures of the New York Art Scene between 1940-1970, showing many of the artists before they became famous.

Director: Emile de Antonio
Stars: Philip Leider, Leo Castelli, Willem de Kooning
Documentary | History | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 8.4/10 X  

From 1940 to 1944, France's Vichy government collaborated with Nazi Germany. Marcel Ophüls mixes archival footage with 1969 interviews of a German officer and of collaborators and ... See full summary »

Director: Marcel Ophüls
Stars: Georges Bidault, Matthäus Bleibinger, Charles Braun
Documentary | Biography
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  
Director: Emile de Antonio
Stars: John Cage, Emile de Antonio, Nancy de Antonio
Edit

Cast

Credited cast:
Roy M. Cohn ...
Himself (archive footage)
Joseph McCarthy ...
Himself (archive footage)
John L. McClellan ...
Himself - U.S. Senator, Arkansas (archive footage)
Karl E. Mundt ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Sen. Karl E. Mundt)
G. David Schine ...
Himself (archive footage) (as Pvt. G. David Schine)
Stuart Symington ...
Himself - U.S. Senator, Missouri (archive footage)
Joseph N. Welch ...
Himself (archive footage)
Edit

Storyline

Point of Order is compiled from TV footage of the 1954 Army-McCarthy hearings, in which the Army accused Senator McCarthy of improperly pressuring the Army for special privileges for Private David Schine, formerly of McCarthy's investigative staff. McCarthy accused the Army of holding Schine hostage to keep him from searching for Communists in the Army. These hearings resulted in McCarthy's eventual censure for conduct unbecoming a senator. Written by <bnorcottmahany@mailcity.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Genres:

Documentary

Certificate:

Not Rated

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

14 January 1964 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Herr ordförande! En ordningsfråga  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Connections

Featured in Zomergasten: Episode #9.2 (1996) See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Shining A Light Into A Dark Corner
5 July 2009 | by (Dallas, Texas) – See all my reviews

Without narration, this documentary presents audio-visual excerpts from the famous Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954. The televised hearings were significant in that they brought to light the mean-spirited, and unfounded, accusations of an American demagogue, Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy, a man who claimed that certain individuals, both in the U.S. Army and elsewhere in American government, were Communist spies.

What is glaringly obvious, from this documentary, is that McCarthy had no evidence. He and his chief counsel, Roy Cohn, accused, implicated, vilified, and pointed fingers. And the political climate in the 1950s was such that even these accusations were enough to destroy the careers and lives of many individuals. McCarthy, an ambitious politician, used fear as a weapon, which contributed to unwarranted suspicion during the Cold War.

The hearings are theatrical, Shakespearean drama, in part. Several times, impassioned speeches are made. At other times, the proceedings are laughably petty, like when the committee examines a photograph of Army Private David Schine (pronounced Shine). The subtext during this segment is that David Schine and Roy Cohn had some sort of homosexual relationship, an ironic development, given that Cohn and McCarthy, as political Conservatives, would be just as hostile to homosexuals as to Communists.

One might think that "Point Of Order" would be dry and boring. But the political atmosphere was so charged, so on-edge, that the viewer can easily discern the tension, the fear, and the anxiety of people who had no idea how these events would play out.

McCarthy probably thought these hearings would be a stepping stone en route to the White House. Instead, the camera, as hero, revealed to the American people that McCarthy was a fear monger. Television was his downfall. And the overall message of "Point Of Order" is that enhanced communications technology, in this case television, can be used to thwart the plans of would-be dictators and tyrants.

Today, money has corrupted television. But communications technology continues to evolve, and the internet now functions as a medium that shines lights into dark corners, as television did fifty years ago.


3 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page