The Outrage (1964) - News Poster

(1964)

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Rashomon

(Region B)   Akira Kurosawa's unquestioned top rank classic remains a fascinating study of truth and justice. A forest encounter left a man murdered and his wife raped. Or did something entirely different happen? The witnesses Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura and Machiko Kyo give radically differing testimony. This UK edition offers a full commentary by Japanese film expert Stuart Galbraith IV. Rashômon Region B UK Blu-ray BFI 1950 / B&W / 1.33:1 / 88 min. / Street Date September 21, 2015 / Available at Amazon UK / £15.99 Starring Toshiro Mifune, Machiko Kyo, Masayuki MoriTakashi Shimura, Minoru Chiaki, Kichijiro Ueda, Fumiko Honma. Cinematography Kazuo Miyagawa Art Direction So Matsuyama Film Editor Akira Kurosawa Original Music Fumio Hayasaka Written by Shinobu Hashimoto, Akira Kurosawa from stories by Ryunosuke Akutagawa Produced by Minoru Jingo, Masaichi Nagata Directed by Akira Kurosawa

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

This reviewer doesn't review most foreign discs, but with major studios licensing out their libraries, there are
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Director & Actor Teams: The Overlooked & Underrated (Part 2 of 2)

Following are some supplemental sections featuring notable director & actor teams that did not meet the criteria for the main body of the article. Some will argue that a number of these should have been included in the primary section but keep in mind that film writing on any level, from the casual to the academic, is a game of knowledge and perception filtered through personal taste.

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Other Notable Director & Actor Teams

This section is devoted to pairings where the duo worked together at least 3 times with the actor in a major role in each feature film, resulting in 1 must-see film.

Terence Young & Sean Connery

Must-See Collaboration: From Russia with Love (1962).

Other Collaborations: Action of the Tiger (1957), Dr. No (1962), Thunderball (1965).

Director Young and actor Connery teamed up to create one of the very best Connery-era James Bond films with From Russia with Love which features a great villainous performance by Robert Shaw
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Fay Kanin obituary

Blacklisted screenwriter and president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The screenwriter Fay Kanin, who has died aged 95, was the only female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in its 86-year history (apart from Bette Davis, who resigned after two months in 1941). She served as president from 1979 to 1983, for the maximum of four consecutive one-year terms. Kanin, who committed herself to the preservation of early Hollywood movies, was first elected president by a board consisting of 34 men and one woman.

"I'm a big feminist," she declared at the time that her play Goodbye, My Fancy opened on Broadway in 1948. "I've put into my play my feeling that women should never back away from life." The serious comedy, with Madeleine Carroll as a powerful congresswoman revisiting her alma mater to receive an honorary degree, ran for more than a year and was made into a 1951 film starring Joan Crawford.
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Fay Kanin obituary

Blacklisted screenwriter and president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences

The screenwriter Fay Kanin, who has died aged 95, was the only female president of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in its 86-year history (apart from Bette Davis, who resigned after two months in 1941). She served as president from 1979 to 1983, for the maximum of four consecutive one-year terms. Kanin, who committed herself to the preservation of early Hollywood movies, was first elected president by a board consisting of 34 men and one woman.

"I'm a big feminist," she declared at the time that her play Goodbye, My Fancy opened on Broadway in 1948. "I've put into my play my feeling that women should never back away from life." The serious comedy, with Madeleine Carroll as a powerful congresswoman revisiting her alma mater to receive an honorary degree, ran for more than a year and was made into a 1951 film starring Joan Crawford.
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Rashomon Criterion Blu-ray Review

Invoke the phrase “greatest movie of all time,” and you’d better bring your A-game. Film fans don’t take their “bests” lightly; while fleeting passions may prompt easy praise (Avatar anyone?), smart folks know that real quality stands the test of time. Akira Kurosawa’s Rashomon is one of perhaps ten films that you could call the greatest out of the gate without immediately being challenged. An undisputed masterpiece, it not only established the director’s reputation but it changed filmmaking in the process. The good people at Criterion, always mindful of cinema’s legacy, have assembled a Blu-ray copy worthy of its exalted status. Hit the jump for my full review. From a technical standpoint, the film is flawless. Dappled lighting renders the black-and-white landscape a gorgeous tableaux, while Dp Kazuo Miyagawa finds innovative ways to emphasize the links between the contrasting narrative. Kurosawa often uses visual tools to convey his story,
See full article at Collider.com »

Ran remade: Kurosawa rights up for grabs

It seems to be the nature of the Hollywood beast: classic films will eventually get remade, under the guise of 'introducing them to a new audience'. Not only the fun, cheesy remakes like Fright Night, or Conan the Barbarian: the rights to several classic Akira Kurosawa films are now on the market.

According to Variety, Splendent Media will represent worldwide rights (outside of Japan) for 69 Kurosawa titles, including films directed by Kurosawa (26 titles), films written by Kurosawa (24 titles) and unproduced screenplays (19 titles). For a full list you can check out Splendent's website: suffice it to say that the list includes Yojimbo, Rashomon, Idiot, and my personal favorite Ran, Kurosawa's 1985 adaptation of King Lear.

For some fans, this news is disheartening. Why not just let a classic film stand, as-is? There are plenty of ways of introducing a classic film to a new audience without remaking it entirely. Theaters have special showings of classic films,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Paul Haggis to Write, Possibly Direct ‘Cell 211’ Remake

In news relating to the foreign-to-English remake department, Deadline (via THR) writer and director Paul Haggis has been selected by CBS Films to pen their remake of the Spanish thriller Cell 211. The film was the big winner at the Goya Awards recently, making a sweep at what is considered to be the Spanish equivalent of the Oscars. So it’s fair to say that it’s a movie worth checking out, but if the prospect of reading scares you enough, now you can just watch the American version!

While he’s been set to write the script, there hasn’t been any word on whether or not that he’ll be directing, although I wouldn’t be completely surprise either way. The plot is the “story of two men on different sides of a prison riot — the inmate leading the rebellion and the young guard trapped in the revolt, who
See full article at The Film Stage »

Epic Dreamer: An Akira Kurosawa Profile (Part 2)

Trevor Hogg profiles the internationally renowned filmmaker Akira Kurosawa in the second of a four part feature... read part one.

“After the Pacific War, a great deal of noise began to be made about freedom of speech, and almost immediately abuses and loss of self-control ensued,” recollected acclaimed filmmaker Akira Kurosawa of life in Post-wwii Japan. “A certain kind of magazine took up flattering readers’ curiosity, provoking scandals with shamelessly vulgar articles.” The prevailing sensationalist mentality had to be addressed. “I felt that this new tendency had to be stamped out before it could spread,” remarked the director. “This was the impetus for Skyandaru (Scandal, 1950).”

A tabloid newspaper falsely reports that artist Ichiro Aoye (Toshiro Mifune) is having a love affair with a famous singer, Miyako Saijo (Yoshiko Yamaguchi); he sues the publication only to be betrayed by his lawyer Hiruta (Takashi Shimura). “While I was writing the script an
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

DVD Review: "The Outrage" Starring Paul Newman

  • CinemaRetro
Warner Home Video has recently released a series of Paul Newman titles that have not previously been available on DVD. We'll be taking a look at some of these titles, beginning with the 1964 western The Outrage.

By Lee Pfeiffer

Paul Newman and director Martin Ritt collaborated on six films of varying quality between the years 1958 and 1967, when both men were at the prime of the careers. One of their most notable misfires was The Outrage, an ambitious 1964 remake of Akira Kurosawa's classic Rashomon redefined as a western. Kurasawa's film told of the kidnapping of an innocent couple by a bandit. The woman is raped and the husband is murdered. However, as various people recall the incident, it becomes clear there are radically different versions of what happened and who was responsible for the death. The premise of remaking the story as a Hollywood production starring Newman probably seemed like a winning proposal for MGM,
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Actor Paul Newman dies at 83

Actor Paul Newman dies at 83
Paul Newman, who combined Method training with matinee idol looks to become the personification of the cool '60s rebel in such iconic roles as the reckless Hud, the defiant Cool Hand Luke and the hotshot Butch Cassidy, died Friday. Surrounded by friends and family, including his wife, Joanne Woodward, the actor and philanthropist passed away at his farmhouse home near Wesport, Conn., after a long battle with cancer. He was 83.

In a film career that spanned nearly six decades, Newman received seven Oscar nominations before he was finally presented with an Honorary Oscar in 1986 "in recognition of his many and memorable and compelling screen performances and for his personal integrity and dedication to his craft."

But then he pulled out a trump card of his own, winning the best actor Academy Award the following year for "The Color of Money," in which he reprised the role of pool shark Fast Eddie Felsen,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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