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Marnie
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Marnie (1964) More at IMDbPro »

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Marnie -- Mark marries Marnie although she is a habitual thief and has serious psychological problems, and tries to help her confront and resolve them.

Overview

User Rating:
7.2/10   28,320 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Winston Graham (from the novel by)
Jay Presson Allen (screenplay)
Contact:
View company contact information for Marnie on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
22 July 1964 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Would his touch end Marnie's unnatural fears or start them again? See more »
Plot:
Mark marries Marnie although she is a habitual thief and has serious psychological problems, and tries to help her confront and resolve them. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(224 articles)
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User Reviews:
"Mother, mother, I am ill...." See more (181 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Tippi Hedren ... Marnie Edgar (as 'Tippi' Hedren)

Sean Connery ... Mark Rutland

Diane Baker ... Lil Mainwaring

Martin Gabel ... Sidney Strutt
Louise Latham ... Bernice Edgar
Bob Sweeney ... Cousin Bob
Milton Selzer ... Man at Track

Alan Napier ... Mr. Rutland
Henry Beckman ... First Detective
Edith Evanson ... Rita - Cleaning Woman

Mariette Hartley ... Susan Clabon

Bruce Dern ... Sailor
S. John Launer ... Sam Ward

Meg Wyllie ... Mrs. Turpin
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Alvin ... Hotel Chauffeur (uncredited)

Kimberly Beck ... Jessica 'Jessie' Cotton (uncredited)
Linden Chiles ... Office Worker (uncredited)
Rupert Crosse ... Office Worker (uncredited)
John Hart ... Minister (uncredited)

Emmaline Henry ... Minor Role (uncredited)

Alfred Hitchcock ... Man Leaving Hotel Room (uncredited)
Kenner G. Kemp ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Louise Lorimer ... Mrs. Strutt (uncredited)
Milton Parsons ... Bald Man (uncredited)

Carmen Phillips ... Sidney Strutt's Secretary (uncredited)

Melody Thomas Scott ... Young Marnie (uncredited)
Bert Stevens ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Man at Racetrack (uncredited)
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Directed by
Alfred Hitchcock 
 
Writing credits
Winston Graham (from the novel by)

Jay Presson Allen (screenplay)

Produced by
Alfred Hitchcock .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Bernard Herrmann (musical composition by)
 
Cinematography by
Robert Burks (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
George Tomasini (edited by)
 
Production Design by
Robert F. Boyle (production designed by) (as Robert Boyle)
 
Set Decoration by
George Milo 
 
Makeup Department
Alexandre .... hairstyles creator: Miss Hedren (as Alexandre of Paris)
Jack Barron .... makeup
Virginia Darcy .... hair stylist
Robert Dawn .... makeup
Howard Smit .... makeup
 
Production Management
Hilton A. Green .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
James H. Brown .... assistant director
Patricia Casey .... assistant director (uncredited)
Hilton A. Green .... assistant director (uncredited)
William Witney .... second unit director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Harold Michelson .... storyboard artist (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
William Russell .... sound recording
Waldon O. Watson .... sound recording
 
Visual Effects by
Albert Whitlock .... pictorial designer
 
Stunts
May Boss .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Leonard J. South .... camera operator (as Leonard South)
Bobby Greene .... first assistant camera (uncredited)
Paul Jacobsen .... electrician (uncredited)
Robert Willoughby .... special still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Vincent Dee .... costume supervision
Edith Head .... costume designer: Miss Hedren and Miss Baker
James Linn .... costumes: men's
Rita Riggs .... costumes: women's
 
Other crew
Peggy Robertson .... assistant: Mr. Hitchcock
Lois Thurman .... script supervisor
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
130 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Brazil:12 | Canada:PG (Manitoba/Ontario) | Canada:13+ (Quebec) | Finland:K-16 | Italy:VM14 | Norway:15 (TV rating) | Norway:16 (1964) | Peru:14 | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | Spain:18 | Sweden:15 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:15 (re-rating) (1993) | USA:Approved (PCA #20710) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | USA:PG (1984) | West Germany:16
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Alfred Hitchcock considered Marlon Brando for the role of Mark Ruland.See more »
Goofs:
Crew or equipment visible: The shadow of the boom mic falls on the wall of Marnie's mother's kitchen while she makes Jessie's pie.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Sidney Strutt:Robbed! Cleaned out! $9,967! Precisely as I told you over the telephone. And that girl did it. Marion Holland. That's the girl. Marion Holland.
First Detective:Can you describe her Mr. Strutt?
Sidney Strutt:Certainly I can describe her: five-five, 110 pounds, size 8 dress, blue eyes, black wavy hair, even features, good teeth.
Sidney Strutt:[detectives unable to restrain laughter] Well what's so damn funny? There's been a grand larceny committed on these premises.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Making 'Taxi Driver' (1999) (V)See more »

FAQ

Did Mark rape Marnie?
What are the "fatted bugs" that Mark describes to Marnie on their honeymoon?
What is 'Marnie' about?
See more »
13 out of 18 people found the following review useful.
"Mother, mother, I am ill....", 16 November 2006
Author: Oggz from london UK

Far and away my favourite Hitch and in my top five movies of all time (yes, I'm very biased but there you go), "Marnie" stands out as one of the most deliciously bitter, malevolent and sardonic "romance" stories ever made, and it doesn't surprise me in the least that it is either sworn by or passionately hated by general public. It is, however, no less influential than any of the acclaimed and widely loved films that Hitch made previously. Even the staunchest of Hitchcock's fans seem to be bitterly divided over this one though, some among them simply not being able to forgive him for being so direct and blatant in choice and treatment of his subject matter (let alone technical inadequacies) - and for delivering a slow, sombre, pain ridden and malignant psychosexual drama, whereas others, myself included, revel in those very aspects of the film. Hedren and Connery's singular coupling on screen and their performances have also been subject to much heated debate - in my opinion they're both excellent, in that they very successfully portray genuinely unlovable characters and play off one another almost instinctively and to great effect, helped by a phenomenally sarcastic dialogue and more than memorable quips ("The idea was to kill myself, not to feed the damned fish", as well as the entire "You Freud, me Jane" sequence). Delightful.

Hedren is adequately surly, bitter, spiteful, troubled and fragile all at the same time, her average acting talents and icy beauty working for the film rather than against it, whereas Connery is nothing short of a perverse yet suave male filthy pig dying to get in between her treasured legs and "take legal possession" for precisely those reasons. Unsurprisingly, the chapter in acclaimed Truffaut's book of interviews with Hitch that belongs to "Marnie" is subtitled "Un Amour Fetishiste" - read it. It's interesting that Hitchcock had troubles with his leading ladies in some of his best films - his disdain of Kim Novak and endless arguments he had with her on set are all well documented, in addition to his falling out with Hedren halfway through "Marnie". Both films are laced with moments of electrifying energy maybe just for that reason, and both women look spectacular on screen. In any case, it's perfect casting for both leads in this one, in addition to a brilliant support led by Latham and Baker, not to mention Herrmann's emotional score, which so assuredly bounces between hysterical, pleading, lustful, torturous, and tragic - and back again.

Aside from directorial touches of genius (who doesn't get goosebumps when Marnie first reveals her face after washing out the hair dye) - there are undoubtedly many, many flaws and technically weak places in the film - the zooming in and out on the money in the Rutland safe is a particular standout in that respect, totally over the top and downright silly. Obviously painted backdrops and horseriding sequences have all been slagged off to death as well (altough surprisingly these don't seem to bother people that much when systematically applied in "The Birds"), but they are more than compensated for by the greyish, autumnal and trance-like feel of the film, and are very likely deliberately calculated in to greatly enhance the overall atmosphere. Hitch doesn't even try to win the viewer's affection by injecting a bit of his trademark humour in this doleful story and rightly so - it would have suffered immeasurably and would have been totally out of place. For this is a serious film about both female and male emotional and sexual hang ups (Hedren: "I'm sick?? Well take a look at yourself, old dear!!...you've got a pathological fix on a woman who's not only an admitted criminal but who screams if you come near her!!" - Connery: "Well I never said I was perfect") - "un grand film malade", as Truffaut affectionately put it - therefore no humour, apart from the bitterest variety, no happy ending, no sympathetic characters we can identify with, nothing. But the manner in which the film ends - the car departing, exiting from screen where previously we saw no street, road or way out - gives a flicker of hope that Marnie will eventually, with or without Mark, be able to find her peace. You can either love or despise the symbolism - it's entirely left to you.

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What was up with that kiss Lil gave Mark? inkkdip
Side by side image grabs of Latham as younger and older Bernice Edgar Stuart Gardner
Worst.. Rocksontheg8
Marnie's knees phreschke
Marnie's Dinner Party jsmiley-770-82269
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