IMDb > Diary of a Chambermaid (1964)
Le journal d'une femme de chambre
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Diary of a Chambermaid (1964) More at IMDbPro »Le journal d'une femme de chambre (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   5,118 votes »
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Down 4% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Octave Mirbeau (based on the novel by)
Luis Buñuel (adaptation) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Diary of a Chambermaid on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
9 March 1965 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
Celestine, the chambermaid, has new job on the country. The Monteils, who she works for are a group of strange people... See more » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
A real heroine - or not. See more (33 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

Directed by
Luis Buñuel 
 
Writing credits
Octave Mirbeau (based on the novel by)

Luis Buñuel (adaptation and dialogue) &
Jean-Claude Carrière (adaptation and dialogue)

Produced by
Michel Safra .... producer
Serge Silberman .... producer
 
Cinematography by
Roger Fellous 
 
Film Editing by
Luis Buñuel 
Louisette Hautecoeur 
 
Production Design by
Georges Wakhévitch 
 
Costume Design by
Georges Wakhévitch 
 
Makeup Department
Simone Knapp .... hair stylist
Maguy Vernadet .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Henri Baum .... production manager
Jacqueline Dudilleux .... assistant production manager
Ulrich Picard .... production manager (as U. Picard)
André Retbi .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Juan Luis Buñuel .... assistant director
Pierre Lary .... assistant director
 
Art Department
René Calviera .... assistant art director
Charles Merangel .... set dresser
 
Sound Department
Robert Cambourakis .... sound assistant
Antoine Petitjean .... sound
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Agathe Beaumont .... second assistant camera
Jean-Louis Castelli .... still photographer
Adolphe Charlet .... camera operator
René Schneider .... first assistant camera
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Jacqueline Moreau .... wardrober
 
Editorial Department
Arlette Lalande .... assistant editor
 
Other crew
Robert Demollière .... administrator
Suzanne Durrenberger .... script supervisor (as Suzanne Duremberg)
Odette Laeupplée .... production secretary
Maurice Otte .... production accountant
Jean Van Praag .... administrator
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Le journal d'une femme de chambre" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
101 min | France:97 min | Brazil:94 min | Argentina:97 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:M | Finland:K-16 | Ireland:12 (DVD rating) | Portugal:M/12 (Qualidade) | Portugal:17 (censored version) | UK:X (original rating) | UK:12 (video rating) (2001) | UK:15 (video rating) (1993) | UK:AA (original rating) (1981) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:12 (w)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This is Luis Buñuel's only film in the anamorphic widescreen format.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Céléstine:Are you from the priory?
Joseph:Yes.
Céléstine:Is it far?
Joseph:You'll see.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Call Him Jess (2000)See more »

FAQ

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23 out of 25 people found the following review useful.
A real heroine - or not., 23 May 2008
Author: Chris_Docker from United Kingdom

Buñuel once said, "Bourgeois morality is for me immoral and to be fought. The morality founded on our most unjust social institutions, like religion, patriotism, the family, culture: briefly, what are called 'the pillars of society'."

I mention this, not to alienate people who might find such a statement offensive, but to suggest insight into his point of view. A viewpoint vigorously defended in this anti-bourgeois, rural tale that has a kick like a mule. Buñuel's truths are just as applicable today but, by putting them in 1930s France, he sweetens the bitter pill with a coating of sex, storytelling and the reassuring fiction that 'things have maybe moved on since then.'

Célestine impresses us. Intelligent, attractive and sophisticated - but she nevertheless needs to earn her living in service. She takes the train from Paris to work as a chambermaid at a country estate. In this lap of wealth, she deals with a panoply of dodgy people. A brutish handyman. A frigidly overbearing Madame Monteil. Madame's lecherous husband and her kinky father. Remarkably, none of these are portrayed as stereotypes. Characters are well fleshed out as Buñuel pits one against another. Madame Monteil earns our sympathy as she confides sexual shortcomings to the priest, who is in turn well-meaning if hopelessly out of touch. Doddering old Monsieur Rabour, although at first shockingly abhorrent with his fixation on women's feet, probably has nothing more harmful than a shoe fetish. "Would you mind if I touch your calf?" he asks (but goes no further up her leg). Is Célestine playing a dangerous game? Is she a libertine? Or just one step ahead of her audience?

The first half of Diary of a Chambermaid is delightful saucy comedy. Buñuel's famed surrealism, that make films like Un Chien Andalou or L'Âge d'Or so formidable, is nowhere to be seen. Nor do we have to grapple with the distanciation of Exterminating Angel, his Brechtian masterpiece of just two years earlier. But be warned, gentle reader. The second half is not only grislier, but by the end Buñuel will have pulled the rug from under your feet. It can be a bleak experience.

Quite apart from a clever story, Diary of a Chambermaid offers many delights, both to casual viewers and serious film analysts. Depending on your viewpoint, Moreau's many-sided performance is either a triumph for feminism or stands feminism on its head. It strips bare the bourgeoisie and capitalist, presenting the rising tide of French fascism as xenophobic intolerance - one we can recognise as replicated in many countries or patriotic cults even today. The hypocrisy of the upper classes is one of 'fur coat and no knickers'; whereas the pious protestations of the lower ranks are shown as the facade from which they lust after the coat itself.

Class-struggle is mirrored by sex-as-power. To men, sex becomes a celebration of might, whether physical, social or financial. To women, it is the potential to entrap with allure. She is always present and always unattainable. Through this implied promise of sexual gratification she bends men to her will. And still projects an aura of 'purity'. Our handyman tortures a goose before killing it – rather horrible, but in a way does it add to his raw animal charm? And is Buñuel really just telling a story? Or is he manipulating his audience to drive the point home?

This is also Buñuel's only film made in anamorphic widescreen format. Although not showy, the cinematography is powerful. Credits open to the sound of a rushing steam train. We watch, through Célestine's eyes, the countryside flash by. A wide angle lens increases the sense of movement, as if we are propelled by an unstoppable force.

When Joseph tries to kiss Célestine at night by the bonfire, his posture is that of a vampire. A snail crawling across the a dead and violated body in the woods is as vivid and shocking as anything from Buñuel's earlier catalogue of slit eyeballs and dead donkeys. But it is Buñuel's acerbic vision of all that is wrong, in all layers of society, that is so chilling.

At one point, Monsieur Rabour is reading the French author JK Huysmans. Huysman's view of the world was as pessimistic as Buñuel, but it is Buñuel that makes it so all-encompassing. The festering fascist mob who cheer for Chiappe in our film, are honouring the same chief of police who prohibited Buñuel's L'Âge d'Or (after fascists destroyed the cinema where it was being shown). There were few governments that liked Buñuel, and we can see that the feeling was mutual.

The film is more political than it is entertaining, which may alienate some viewers who start off liking it. Even the title seems cynical – I don't recall any suggestion of her keeping a journal. Diary of a Chambermaid is a great vehicle for Moreau, who gets to play so many characters in one. A criticism often levelled at mainstream cinema is that women tend to be decoration in male-driven plots. Célestine (or 'Marie' as she is called in another dig at Catholic - or class - depersonalisation) doesn't so much take over the driving seat as suggest a new perspective from which she is in control. Audiences will divide on whether they ultimately like her or not.

Things may have moved on. Domestic service is less harsh in most parts of the world where it survives today. Fascism has been replaced with virulent if not yet such obvious forms of rampant and aggressive nationalism. Sex is not always a game of power. But forces of immorality still pose in white robes and high office. 'Commoners' still aspire to the evils they decry. The purity of a saint is maybe needed to 'enjoy' Diary of a Chambermaid. But Buñuel stood up for his beliefs. Today, most viewers may content themselves with standing up for his cinematic skills.

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