6.5/10
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1 user 1 critic

Hor B'Levana (1964)

| Comedy | 1964 (Israel)
A new immigrant, Tzelnik, arrives at the port of Jaffa. He goes to live in the Negev desert where he opens a kiosk in the middle of nowhere. Mizrachi comes along and opens a competing ... See full summary »

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Cast

Credited cast:
Avraham Heffner
Christiane Dancourt
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Amos Avni
Zeev Berlinsky
Daphna Eilat ...
(as Daphne Eilat)
Yechezkel Ish Kasit
...
(as Shmuel Kraus)
Iche Mambush
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Storyline

A new immigrant, Tzelnik, arrives at the port of Jaffa. He goes to live in the Negev desert where he opens a kiosk in the middle of nowhere. Mizrachi comes along and opens a competing business across the way. The two make a living by selling to each other. As there is nothing there, they decide to create a world out of their imagination. They build a cardboard film set, which slowly takes on real dimensions- the buildings turn to concrete, people come to audition for parts in the "film" (cinema 'verite' style, with Zohar mocking viciously the pretensions of the "actresses") and builders come to void apartment buildings (mocking the glorification of concrete and "heroic" settlement). In one sequence, Arab actors come and ask the filmmakers turn positive to negative, and they're given the role of pioneers who plow the land and sing Zionist songs. The imagined world of the filmmakers becomes so real eventually they lose sight of the thin line between fantasy and reality. Written by AnonymousB

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avant garde film | satire | See All (2) »

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Comedy

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1964 (Israel)  »

Also Known As:

Hole in the Moon  »

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Connections

Featured in A History of Israeli Cinema (2009) See more »

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User Reviews

It hasn't aged well
8 July 2000 | by (Israel) – See all my reviews

Among the shapers of Israeli culture, Uri Zohar was one who helped replace the cult of the Nation with the everyday modern cult of the Individual. Movies like this one say "I have the budget, I'm going to bring along some friends and have some fun." Heady stuff at the time. "Hole in the Moon" was considered revolutionary. But Zohar himself was ahead of the pack when, a decade or two later, he renounced all his previous work and went off to devote himself to religion. The rest of us can see too, now, that the fun was evanescent. Unless the actors are favorites of yours anyway, it's hard to find much enjoyment left in this movie.


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