Tweety Bird is on vacation with his mistress, Granny, in Hawaii, where Sylvester Cat is scrounging for food on a beach. Sylvester spots Tweety and tries to reach him in his cage, which is ... See full summary »

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(story), (story)
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Cast

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Sylvester / Tweety (voice)
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Granny (voice)
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Storyline

Tweety Bird is on vacation with his mistress, Granny, in Hawaii, where Sylvester Cat is scrounging for food on a beach. Sylvester spots Tweety and tries to reach him in his cage, which is guarded by Granny's pet shark named Sharkey. Sharkey keeps foiling Sylvester's plans. Written by Kevin McCorry <mmccorry@nb.sympatico.ca>

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Approved
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27 June 1964 (USA)  »

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(Technicolor)

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Spoofs Hawaiian Eye (1959) See more »

Soundtracks

My Isle of Golden Dreams
(uncredited)
Music by Walter Blaufuss and Gus Kahn
[Plays over the title cards.]
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
"What goes good with broiled squab?"
20 September 2015 | by (USA) – See all my reviews

Granny, Tweety, and Sylvester are all in Hawaii. While Granny's out partying it up, Sylvester tries to get at Tweety but Granny's pet shark (?) stands in his way. A lackluster effort that has some sad historical significance for Looney Tunes fans. It's the last Tweety theatrical short (and therefore the last Sylvester & Tweety team-up) of the classic era. It's also the last short produced by the original Warner Bros. animation studio (aka Termite Terrace) before it shut down and handed production over to DePatie-Freleng Enterprises. The quality would never be the same and Looney Tunes would essentially be over by the end of the decade, until revived later for subpar television cartoons. As for this short, it's pretty weak stuff. There are no funny gags. The shark, which barely looks like a shark, is lame. The animation is colorful but sketchy. Still, it's better than many other examples I could give from around this time and certainly better than most of what was to come in the next few years. The voice work from Mel Blanc and June Foray is good. The Bill Lava score is uninspired but not as bad as his Road Runner work. Altogether it's a disappointing short that marks the end of an era for a character that has given generations of people lots of laughs.


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