IMDb > The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)
The Fall of the Roman Empire
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964) More at IMDbPro »

Photos (See all 30 | slideshow)

Overview

User Rating:
6.7/10   5,198 votes »
Your Rating:
Saving vote...
Deleting vote...
/10   (delete | history)
Sorry, there was a problem
MOVIEmeter: ?
Down 2% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Ben Barzman (screenplay) &
Basilio Franchina (screenplay) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Fall of the Roman Empire on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
26 March 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The Most Magnificent Re-Creation . . . Of An Ancient Empire . . . Launches A New Epoch In Motion Pictures . . .
Plot:
Action-packed look at the beginnings of the fall of the Roman Empire. Here is the glory, the greed and grandeur that was Rome... See more » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(19 articles)
10 Things You Didn’t Know About Gladiator
 (From Obsessed with Film. 14 August 2014, 8:31 AM, PDT)

New on Video: ‘Men in War’
 (From SoundOnSight. 1 May 2014, 9:05 PM, PDT)

Special Features - Spartacus: Gods of the Small Screen
 (From Flickeringmyth. 29 April 2013, 10:00 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
All Roads Lead to Rome See more (89 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Sophia Loren ... Lucilla

Stephen Boyd ... Livius

Alec Guinness ... Marcus Aurelius

James Mason ... Timonides

Christopher Plummer ... Commodus

Anthony Quayle ... Verulus

John Ireland ... Ballomar

Omar Sharif ... Sohamus

Mel Ferrer ... Cleander
Eric Porter ... Julianus

Finlay Currie ... Senator
Andrew Keir ... Polybius
Douglas Wilmer ... Niger
George Murcell ... Victorinus
Norman Wooland ... Virgilianus
Michael Gwynn ... Cornelius
Virgilio Teixeira ... Marcellus (as Virgilio Texera)
Peter Damon ... Claudius
Rafael Calvo ... Lentulus
Lena von Martens ... Helva (as Lena Von Martens)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Roland Carey ... Barbarian (uncredited)
Margaret Fuller ... Part of Court (uncredited)
Gabriella Licudi ... Tauna (uncredited)
Jeffrey O'Kelly ... Brother of Livius (uncredited)
Robert Rietty ... Opening Narrator (voice) (uncredited)

Guy Rolfe ... Marius (uncredited)
Friedrich von Ledebur ... Barbarian (uncredited)
Patricia Wright ... Roman citizen, Slave woman (uncredited)
Create a character page for: ?

Directed by
Anthony Mann 
 
Writing credits
Ben Barzman (screenplay) &
Basilio Franchina (screenplay) &
Philip Yordan (screenplay)

Edward Gibbon  based on "The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire" (uncredited)

Produced by
Samuel Bronston .... producer
Jaime Prades .... associate producer
Michal Waszynski .... executive associate producer (as Michael Waszynski)
 
Original Music by
Dimitri Tiomkin 
 
Cinematography by
Robert Krasker (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Robert Lawrence 
 
Casting by
Maude Spector 
 
Production Design by
Veniero Colasanti 
John Moore 
 
Set Decoration by
Veniero Colasanti 
John Moore 
 
Costume Design by
Veniero Colasanti 
John Moore 
 
Makeup Department
Grazia De Rossi .... hairdresser (as Grazia DeRossi)
Mario Van Riel .... makeup artist
José Luis Pérez .... assistant makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
C.O. Erickson .... executive production manager
Tadeo Villalba .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Yakima Canutt .... second unit director
José López Rodero .... assistant director: first unit
José María Ochoa .... assistant director: second unit
Andrew Marton .... second unit director (uncredited)
Julio Sempere .... second second assistant director (uncredited in original version)
 
Art Department
Stanley Detlie .... master of properties
José María Alarcón .... assistant set decorator (uncredited)
Luciano Arroyo .... storyboard artist (uncredited)
Julián Martín .... painter (uncredited)
Vicente Sempere Sempere .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Italo Tomassi .... head scenic painter (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Milton C. Burrow .... sound effects editor (as Milton Burrow)
David Hildyard .... sound mixer
Gordon K. McCallum .... sound re-recordist
Otto Snel .... sound recordist (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Alex Weldon .... special effects
 
Stunts
Jerry Brown .... stunts (uncredited)
Tap Canutt .... stunt double: Stephen Boyd (uncredited)
Tap Canutt .... stunts (uncredited)
Yakima Canutt .... stunt coordinator (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunt double: Christopher Plummer (uncredited)
Jack Williams .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
John Harris .... camera operator
Cecilio Paniagua .... second unit cameraman
Bruno Pasqualini .... supervising electrician
Vincent Rossell .... still photographer (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Gloria Musetta .... wardrobe (as Gloria Mussetta)
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Magdalena Paradell .... assistant to editor
 
Music Department
George Korngold .... music editor
Dimitri Tiomkin .... conductor
Cecil Bolton .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Frank Comstock .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Robert Docker .... orchestrator (uncredited)
George Parrish .... orchestrator (uncredited)
David Tamkin .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Herbert Taylor .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Samuel Bronston .... presenter
Will Durant .... consultant
Carl Gibson .... supervising technician
Maciek Piotrowski .... title backgrounds and murals
Elaine Schreyeck .... continuity
George Tyne .... dialogue coach
Enzo Musumeci Greco .... master of arms (uncredited)
Friedrich von Ledebur .... horse master (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies
Create a character page for: ?

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
188 min | Sweden:172 min (1970 re-release) | Sweden:176 min | Argentina:184 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (35 mm optical prints) | 70 mm 6-Track (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:G | Finland:K-12 (uncut) (1989) | Finland:K-12 (cut) (1973) | Finland:K-16 (uncut) (1964) | Germany:12 (DVD rating) | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | South Korea:12 | UK:U (passed with cuts) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video re-rating) (2010) (2011) | UK:U (video rating) (1987) (1997) | USA:Unrated | West Germany:12 (f)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Christopher Plummer was 33 at the time of filming, although his character Commodus became Emperor at the age of 19.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Commodus and Livius are holding the torch during Marcus Aurelius' funeral pyre, their hands move further away from the flame between shots.See more »
Quotes:
Livius:[standing over body of Timonides] What happened, gentle Greek? Did you try to tell them there were three possibilities? Did you not know there was a fourth? This!
[picks up and throws spear away]
Lucilla:This is the way they answer to reason and now even you must see, this is the only way to answer them.
Livius:He does not seem dead to me, I can still feel his life, hear his words. Tell me what I must do in his name.
[yelling]
Livius:March the army into Rome and drown the city in blood!
Lucilla:[uncovering the Christian cross Timonides wore around his neck] He was my father's friend and a wise man.
[...]
See more »
Movie Connections:
Spoofed in The Muppets Go to the Movies (1981) (TV)See more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
33 out of 48 people found the following review useful.
All Roads Lead to Rome, 23 October 2005
Author: bkoganbing from Buffalo, New York

I saw another reviewer remark that he regretted the fact that films like this are not made today. In today's dollars the salaries of all the name actors who appeared in The Fall of the Roman Empire might retire the debt of some third world country. Then again, I think that was part of the message this film was trying to convey.

All roads lead to Rome was certainly a popular saying way back in the day. The legions by 180 have conquered a big chunk of Europe and a lot of Asia Minor, but it's becoming too big to police. Emperor Marcus Aurelius has it in mind that there must be a better way of securing peace than having a big Roman military industrial complex on the empire payroll. Answer, make the outlying provinces all Roman citizens and equalize the distribution of economic goods. Back then all those Roman roads gradually became one way streets.

Unfortunately some folks who have a vested interest in maintaining the status quo, do in Marcus. He's succeeded by his son Commodus and the film is the story of Commodus who has a more traditional political view and those who want to bring about the ideal world that Marcus Aurelius envisioned.

In a role that cried out for either Kirk Douglas or Charlton Heston, we got Stephen Boyd instead. Boyd in a blonde dye job, just doesn't come across well as the hero Livius. He's so much better as villains in films like The Bravados, Ben-Hur, and Shalako.

But Commodus may very well have been Christopher Plummer's finest performance on screen. The film is not the real story of Commodus's reign, but Plummer does capture the heart and soul of the emperor who ran things from 180 to 192.

Holding up the view of a free and equal world are a couple of classic performances by Alec Guinness as Marcus Aurelius and James Mason as the Greek slave Timonides who counsels Marcus in his changing world view.

And any film is worth watching with Sophia Loren's pulchritude on prominent display.

I'm no expert in ancient history, but this may have been the first time that someone like Marcus Aurelius took a global view of things other than what I can plunder out of my conquests. What's not told in this story is that Christianity is invisible here. Marcus didn't like them at all, thought they were way too exclusive in THEIR view of things.

Nevertheless The Fall of the Roman Empire and the issues it raises from the ancient world are still being thrashed out today. Hoperfully it will all be resolved in the future.

Was the above review useful to you?
See more (89 total) »

Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for The Fall of the Roman Empire (1964)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
James Mason- The glue who held this epic together friedmanatbd
An excellent DVD is out at last! Rueiro
Gladiator ripped off TFOTRE MrTeal
Sophia Loren pkryder-1
Commodus' imperial quarters keltwhip
James Mason and Alec Guinness the orators dave_wlogan
See more »

Recommendations

If you enjoyed this title, our database also recommends:
- - - - -
King Arthur Giants of Rome Julius Caesar Timeline Samson and Delilah
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
IMDb User Rating:
Show more recommendations

Related Links

Full cast and crew Company credits External reviews
News articles IMDb Drama section IMDb USA section

You may report errors and omissions on this page to the IMDb database managers. They will be examined and if approved will be included in a future update. Clicking the 'Edit page' button will take you through a step-by-step process.