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Fail Safe (1964) More at IMDbPro »Fail-Safe (original title)

2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

8 items from 2015

The Satan Bug

22 September 2015 10:02 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Techno-thriller fans have been waiting a long time for a good disc of action ace John Sturges' sci-fi espionage suspenser. George Maharis, Richard Basehart, Anne Francis and Dana Andrews must stop a madman who has snatched a full battery of deadly bio-warfare viruses from a super-secret government lab. Each flask can wipe out an entire city, and one of them will kill every living thing on the planet. The Satan Bug Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1965 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 114 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring George Maharis, Richard Basehart, Anne Francis, Dana Andrews, John Larkin, Richard Bull, Frank Sutton, Edward Asner, Simon Oakland, John Anderson, James Hong, Hari Rhodes, Henry Beckman, Harry Lauter, Tol Avery, Russ Bender, James Doohan, Harold Gould, Carey Loftin. Cinematography Robert Surtees Film Editor Ferris Webster Original Music Jerry Goldsmith Written by Edward Anhalt, James Clavell from the novel by Ian Stuart (Alistair MacLean »

- Glenn Erickson

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‘Young Dr. Malone’ Actor John P. Connell Dies at 91

10 September 2015 12:36 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

John P. Connell, best known as the star of the daytime drama “Young Dr. Malone,” died Thursday in Woodland Hills. He was 91.

Born in Philadelphia, Connell received five battle stars and a Purple Heart during World War II. He was a radio operator and waist gunner aboard a B-24 crew which completed 43 bombing missions.

He broke into show business on Broadway in “Time Limit” and “Uncle Willie” and with the national company of “Picnic.” Connell worked on dozens of live TV broadcasts, including “Studio One in Hollywood,” “Kraft Theatre,” “You Are There,” and “Goodyear Playhouse” and starred for five years as Dr. David Malone on “Young Dr. Malone.”

He also collaborated with his wife Mila to write more than 100 “Secret Storm” scripts. Connell’s film work included “Three Days of the Condor,” “Family Business” and “Fail Safe.”

Connell also became a ubiquitous radio and television spokesman for hundreds of sponsors. »

- Dave McNary

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Hiroshima 70th Anniversary: Six Must-Watch Movies Remembering the A-Bomb Terror

6 August 2015 10:38 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'The Beginning or the End' 1947 with Robert Walker and Tom Drake. Hiroshima bombing 70th anniversary: Six movies dealing with the A-bomb terror Seventy years ago, on Aug. 6, 1945, the U.S. dropped the first atomic bomb over the city of Hiroshima. Ultimately, anywhere between 70,000 and 140,000 people died – in addition to dogs, cats, horses, chickens, and most other living beings in that part of the world. Three days later, America dropped a second atomic bomb, this time over Nagasaki. Human deaths in this other city totaled anywhere between 40,000-80,000. For obvious reasons, the evisceration of Hiroshima and Nagasaki has been a quasi-taboo in American films. After all, in the last 75 years Hollywood's World War II movies, from John Farrow's Wake Island (1942) and Mervyn LeRoy's Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo (1944) to Steven Spielberg's Saving Private Ryan (1998) and Michael Bay's Pearl Harbor (2001), almost invariably have presented a clear-cut vision »

- Andre Soares

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War Book review – sober speculation goes nuclear

6 August 2015 2:15 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

An expert cast and dynamic direction lend momentum to this pointed Whitehall drama about the fallout of a missile strike

The latest collaboration between writer Jack Thorne and director Tom Harper (The Scouting Book for Boys) very smartly updates Fail Safe from 1964. A group of Whitehall mandarins gather under no-nonsense Sophie Okonedo to role play the national security consequences of a Pakistani nuclear strike on India; inevitably, what begins as a jolly lunchtime skive soon turns deadly serious.

Theatricality looms, but the variation of voices and viewpoints among the expert cast generates a rat-a-tat momentum: Thorne crafts rhetorical flourishes for veteran Antony Sher, agonised lefty Shaun Evans and a shellshocked Kerry Fox. Harper’s framing is always dynamic, and often pointed: each glimpse of life passing blithely by this room’s only window provides a sobering reminder of the extent to which we’re at the mercy of those who would govern us. »

- Mike McCahill

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Stanley Kubrick's 13 movies ranked from worst to best

26 July 2015 1:30 AM, PDT | Digital Spy | See recent Digital Spy - Movie News news »

Stanley Kubrick was a sucker for order, so he might have appreciated the desire to catalogue his career. However, since his films often warn against placing too much faith in systems, perhaps he knew that this way madness lies.

Frankly, most of his films have fair claim to being number one, so establishing first amongst equals means some hard choices have been made along the way - just try not to trigger the doomsday device or start swinging the axe if you don't agree.

So without further ado, let's open the pod bay doors and enter the enigmatic, exceptional work of Stanley Kubrick.

13. Fear and Desire (1953)

Even a genius has to start somewhere. Already a successful magazine photographer and documentary maker, 24-year-old Kubrick directed his debut about a military mission on limited funds - it was shot silently with sound added later.

Plagued by difficulties, Kubrick later called it "a completely inept oddity, »

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Daily | Cannes 2015 | Nancy Buirski’s By Sidney Lumet

22 May 2015 6:31 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

In Nancy Buirski's By Sidney Lumet, the director "shares great insights on Dog Day Afternoon and Network and on how his army experiences influenced Fail Safe and The Hill," notes Ben Kenigsberg at "Lumet notes that he took knocks from auteurists for working in a wide variety of subjects and genres, yet he sees a common question at the core of all his films: 'Is it fair?'" For the Hollywood Reporter's David Rooney, the documentary "sheds light on the profoundly moral and inherently democratic sensibility that shaped his output, in which questions of justice and fairness provide a thematic bedrock, albeit one that Lumet claims was formed more by accident than design." We're collecting more reviews. » - David Hudson »

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Cannes Review: Documentary 'By Sidney Lumet' Is A Rewarding, Wide-Ranging, Conversation With A Master

18 May 2015 6:21 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

His films don't necessarily have the hip reputations of some of his contemporaries, he wasn't as precious about the work as some other auteurs, and he never won a Best Director Oscar (though he received an honorary one in 2005). But there can be no question that Sidney Lumet was one of American cinema's finest filmmakers, as anyone who has read his seminal book "Making Movies," or just seen one of his many great films, can attest. Over a 50-year career, and almost as many movies (here's our retrospective of his work), Lumet undeniably made some duff films ("The Wiz," "A Price Above Rubies" and "Gloria"), but for every questionable picture, there were two solid classics. Read More: Watch: Sidney Lumet's 1955 Rejected TV Pilot 'The Challenge' Starting with his 1957 debut "12 Angry Men," and ending with the brutal, powerful "Before The Devil Knows You're Dead," with works like "Fail-Safe, »

- Oliver Lyttelton

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Remembering Sidney Lumet

1 April 2015 4:42 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Interview | See recent The Hollywood Interview news »

April 9th will mark the four year anniversary of director Sidney Lumet's passing, at age 86. Lumet was the first director I interviewed whose one-sheet posters hung on my wall as a kid. He was an idol, an icon, and an inspiration. I wasn't yet 30 in April 1997, when I met him at The Four Seasons Hotel in Beverly Hills for our interview at the press junket for "Night Falls On Manhattan," one of his solid, authentic urban dramas that blended crime, politics and personal revelations that became his signature.

Lumet immediately put any butterflies I had at ease. Diminutive, but with the infectious energy of a teenager, his was a disarming presence. He paid me a compliment on my sportcoat, saying that I looked a bit like the young Mickey Rourke (which I still don't see, but what the hell), then went on to regale me for an hour with »

- The Hollywood

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009

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