IMDb > Black Like Me (1964)

Black Like Me (1964) More at IMDbPro »

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6.7/10   357 votes »
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Release Date:
20 May 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
"I changed the color of my skin... now I know what it feels like to be BLACK!"
Plot:
Based on the true story of a white reporter who, at the height of the civil-rights movement, temporarily darkened his skin so that he could experience the realities of a black man's life in the segregated South. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
(9 articles)
DVD Release: Black Like Me
 (From Disc Dish. 11 December 2012, 11:52 AM, PST)

The Controversial (And Unbelievable) 'Black Like Me' Coming Out On DVD
 (From ShadowAndAct. 25 October 2012, 10:32 PM, PDT)

Jephté Bastien: 'Sortie 67' Not a Film On Street Gangs
 (From The Cultural Post. 29 October 2010, 5:00 AM, PDT)

User Reviews:
Flawed but important book; flawed but minor movie See more (13 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order)

James Whitmore ... John Finley Horton

Sorrell Booke ... Dr. Jackson

Roscoe Lee Browne ... Christopher

Al Freeman Jr. ... Thomas Newcomb

Will Geer ... Truckdriver
Robert Gerringer ... Ed Saunders

Clifton James ... Eli Carr
John Marriott ... Hodges
Thelma Oliver ... Georgie
Lenka Peterson ... Lucy Horton (as Lenka Petersen)
P. Jay Sidney ... Frank Newcomb (as P.J. Sidney)
Billie Allen ... Vertell
Alan Bergmann ... Charles Maynard
Stanley Brock ... Salesman

Heywood Hale Broun
Sarah Cunningham ... Mary Saunders

David Huddleston
Eva Jessye ... Mrs. Townsend
D'Urville Martin
Walter Mason ... Mason
Richard Ward ... Burt Wilson
rest of cast listed alphabetically:

Matt Clark ... Mugger in alley
Ralph Dunn ... Priest
Fred Parrulli ... Man on Bus

Dan Priest ... Bus Driver

Denver Pyle ... Man in pick-up truck
Lew Skinner ... Stretch
Raymond St. Jacques ... Burial Insurance Salesman
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Directed by
Carl Lerner 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Paul Green  uncredited
John Howard Griffin  book
Carl Lerner 
Gerda Lerner 

Produced by
Julius Tannenbaum .... producer
 
Original Music by
Meyer Kupferman 
 
Cinematography by
Victor Lukens 
Henry Mueller  (as Henry Mueller II)
 
Film Editing by
Lora Hays 
 
Casting by
Chuck Gordone 
 
Production Management
Tony LaMarca .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Tony LaMarca .... assistant director
Edward Wells .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Jack Fitzstephens .... sound editor
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Alton D. Reed .... gaffer
 
Editorial Department
Sanford Rackow .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Meyer Kupferman .... conductor
 
Other crew
John G. Avildsen .... assistant to director (as John Avildsen)
Gladys Thomas .... community liaison
 

Production CompaniesDistributors
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Additional Details

Runtime:
105 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.78 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:

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15 out of 18 people found the following review useful.
Flawed but important book; flawed but minor movie, 25 June 2007
Author: John Esche from Jersey City, New Jersey

Obviously hampered by a small "independent" budget and the casting of James Whitmore (a fine stage actor who, unlike the original author of the book, John Howard Griffin, simply cannot believably pass for a black man) in the lead, director Carl Lerner's screenplay (co-written with Gerda Lerner and an uncredited Paul Green) shuns Griffin's chronological story telling through dated diary entries and rearranges the events Griffin told so well to surprisingly LESS dramatic effect, but it gives a movingly honest portrayal of life in the South near the start of the long over-due civil rights movement.

The year this film was released my (white) family was transferred to a suburb of Atlanta, Ga. from a Virginia suburb of Washington D.C., and enroute we were stunned to see Klansmen in full regalia out on the interstate in North Carolina inspecting cars coming down from the north. It was just one of those things one had to live with at the time - like civil rights workers being murdered and their killers, when caught, being acquitted by all white juries - but this film manages, despite honestly showing the unremitting low grade caution every black person had to live with, and the blatant racism of a few Southern whites, to also be fair to the majority which was merely oblivious to - and sometimes even quietly disapproving of the evil around them - who wouldn't intentionally hurt a black person.

This well meaning majority,unintentionally perpetuating what they saw as "something they couldn't do anything about," eventually came around - and the book helped, even if the movie went largely unseen.

One of the most effecting - but at the same time least persuasive - sections of the film comes late, when Whitmore/Griffin's character tries to justify his actions to a rising young black activist (excellently played to type by Al Freeman Jr.). As it turned out, Griffin's book actually did help in the long struggle for equality, bringing the reality of a shame to the attention of the rest of the nation which needed the reminder as it demanded and helped the South come into the 20th Century, but the film only touches on the screams of outrage from the South at the mirror being held up so honestly to something they did not wish to see.

This was only a few years after the "Stars and Bars" (the old Confederate Battle Flag alluded to so effectively in the opening credits of this film) was pointedly added to the Georgia state flag in protest to Federal Civil Rights legislation. Bigots (self identifying and otherwise) called it an emblem of "local pride and heritage" - realists saw it for what it was in the modern usage and timing: a symbol of hate, rebellion and intimidation.

Times really have changed radically in the 40+ years since this film was made, and today the movie is chiefly valuable as a document of what life was like in Mississippi, Alabama, Louisiana and Georgia during Griffin's all too brief (one month) sojourn on the other side of the color barrier. The street scenes and home details are perfectly observed. As one who lived through the period, I can testify the film is not over stated politically or socially.

The movie BLACK LIKE ME does not portray "every white person as a bigot" (though in my years growing up in the South, I never met a bigot who self-identified as one), but it does show how a rotten few can intimidate a complacent majority on any issue. As we let some politicians play "the terror card" to suspend out liberties in the 21st Century, or the pseudo-"religious" and "guilt by association cards" to deny the right to marriage to significant parts of the population at a time when stable relationships are in society's best interest, it is perhaps a lesson worth remembering. The sad thing is that for the most part, the only people who will bother to watch this flawed but decent film are for the most part the ones who already know.

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