The cousins St. Clair and Fleming are con-men so successful they no longer need to con. They can be persuaded, however, to use their skills: in a just cause, where a mark deserves it very, very much.

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1  
1965   1964  
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 2 nominations. See more awards »

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Cast

Series cast summary:
Robert Coote ...
 Timmy St. Clair / ... (30 episodes, 1964-1965)
...
 Tony Fleming (29 episodes, 1964-1965)
...
 Marcel St. Clair (29 episodes, 1964-1965)
...
 Alec Fleming (29 episodes, 1964-1965)
...
 Margaret St. Clair (25 episodes, 1964-1965)
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Storyline

The cousins St. Clair and Fleming are con-men so successful they no longer need to con. They can be persuaded, however, to use their skills: in a just cause, where a mark deserves it very, very much. Written by Cleo <frede005@maroon.tc.umn.edu>

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Release Date:

13 September 1964 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Gauner gegen Gauner  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(30 episodes)

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Trivia

David Niven (Alec Fleming) and Robert Coote (Timmy St. Clair) both played Captain Fritz von Tarlenheim in different adaptations of the 1894 novel "The Prisoner of Zenda" by Anthony Hope: Niven in The Prisoner of Zenda (1937) and Coote in The Prisoner of Zenda (1952). See more »

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User Reviews

too good to last
22 February 2000 | by See all my reviews

Obviously a show as deliciously witty and as sparklingly clever as this, with such a magnificent cast - David Niven, Gladys Cooper, Charles Boyer, Robert Coote, Gig Young, Larry Hagman, and John Williams - was too good for the tastes of the American public. It lasted just one season. On the other hand, the execrable "Beverly Hillbillies" - a more accurate barometer of the American public's sense of humor - marched on in glory for nine tedious years.


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