"Peyton Place"
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5 items from 2016

It Came From The Tube: Salem’S Lot (1979)

14 August 2016 11:09 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Stephen King adaptations are very hard to pull off successfully. For every Misery, there’s a Graveyard Shift; Carrie soars while Cujo stalls. The small screen has had it just as bad—the elephantine The Stand benefits from its four-night rollout, while no amount of time could save The Tommyknockers. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg—at last count, there were 91 King adaptations (I’ll need to double-check those figures) across all media. For this blurry-eyed cathode ray kid, however, nothing has yet to match the two-part graveyard dance known as Salem’s Lot (1979).

Originally airing on CBS on Saturday November 17th and 24th, Salem’s Lot was a huge success for the network; there was even talk of turning it into a weekly series. Alas, that never came to be. However, we were gifted with 183 minutes of measured, chilling suspense and terror helmed by none other »

- Scott Drebit

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Criterion Reflections – Rosemary’s Baby (1968) – #630

30 May 2016 10:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

David’s Quick Take for the tl;dr Media Consumer:

Roman Polanski made a massively successful transition to Hollywood filmmaking in this iconic horror-thriller classic of the psychologically disorienting variety. All the elements at play come together with the kind of perfect synchronization that signals the beginning of a new era in cinema: Mia Farrow’s star-making performance as a naive young wife living through a worst nightmare scenario, a flawless gradual atmospheric transition from seeming everyday normalcy into deeply disturbing paranoia, unsettling pivots between charming oddball humor and creeping, continually intensifying dread, and a perfectly timed interjection of quotidian satanism as practiced by one’s next door neighbors, when the taboos were still intact and capable of delivering maximum shock value. Rosemary’s Baby opened up new territory for mass audiences to experience intense levels of anxiety that didn’t depend on directors resorting to jump scenes, gratuitous violence, »

- David Blakeslee

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Beauty Break: Ryan O'Neal

20 April 2016 2:27 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Baby Tatum and dad RyanToday is the 75th birthday of early 70s cinema's golden boy Ryan O'Neal. Happy Birthday Father o' Tatum. The picture to the left is just the cutest thing ever, don't you think? If not you don't cherish and worship and love to revisit Paper Moon (1973) in which the real life father & daughter stars played a fictional father and daughter, and played it to perfection in one of the greatest movies of that enormously fine cinematic decade.

But today, perhaps, younger readers don't really know Ryan O'Neal. In today's celebrity parlance I would suggest that he's something like a cross between Ryan Phillipe (all-american golden boy, super young dad as celebrity parenting goes, who remains more famous for his personal life than his career) and Leonardo DiCaprio (I shall explain). After coming to fame on television's Peyton Place (1964-1969) O'Neal was Oscar nominated for the #1 box office »


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Peyton Place: James Douglas Dies at 86

22 March 2016 5:39 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

We are sorry to report actor James Douglas died on March 5, 2016. Perhaps best known for his roles on cancelled TV shows like the daytime soap operas As the World Turns (CBS), One Life to Life (ABC) and ABC's primetime soap, Peyton Place, Douglas had a long TV career.

His first appearance was on The Millionaire TV series, in 1957. Director James Sheldon, who died on Saturday, March 19, directed that series. Other TV appearances by Douglas include the soap operas Another World, The Doctors, and The Edge of Night, as well as primetime offerings like 12 O'Clock High, Ironside, and Spenser for Hire.


- TVSeriesFinale.com

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James Douglas Dies: ‘Peyton Place’, ‘As The World Turns’ Actor Was 86

22 March 2016 11:58 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

James Douglas, a ruggedly handsome, intense actor who starred in ABC’s racy primetime drama Peyton Place and CBS’ soap opera As The World Turns, has died. He was 86. His family confirmed his death on March 5 in Bethlehem Ct, where a wake in his honor was held on March 17 and 18. Douglas’ wife, Dawn, predeceased him. During the five seasons (1964-69) that Peyton Place set the bar for timely, often risqué TV drama, Douglas played lawyer Steven Cord on some 400 episodes of… »

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005 | 2003

5 items from 2016

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