The Hollywood Palace (1964) - News Poster

(1964–1970)

News

Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86

Marni Nixon, Voice Behind Stars in Movie Musicals Like ‘My Fair Lady,’ Dies at 86
Marni Nixon, who gained fame as a “ghost singer” for Deborah Kerr in “The King and I,” Natalie Wood in “West Side Story” and Audrey Hepburn in “My Fair Lady,” died of breast cancer on Sunday in New York City. She was 86.

In the 1940s, ’50s and into the ’60s, major film actresses without great singing voices were often “dubbed” by anonymous background singers. Studio execs preferred to keep alive the myth that the stars did their own singing. Nixon became the most famous of these — inadvertently at first, because Kerr spilled the beans in an interview about “The King and I” in 1956.

She was born Feb. 22, 1930, in Altadena, Calif. By the time she was 4, her family discovered that she had the rare gift of “perfect pitch” and started her on violin lessons.

By the time she was 7, she was working as an extra or bit player in films, which continued through her teen years.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Video of the Day: First Recorded BMX, Flatland-Style Bike Tricks

Bob Haro may be popularly known as “The Father of Freestyle” but long before he and other BMX racers enjoyed pushing the stylistic limits of what they could do on their bikes, Japanese ballerina Lilly Yokoi was miles ahead. Known as “The Ballerina On The Golden Bicycle,” Yokoi appeared The Hollywood Palace in 1965, a TV variety show hosted by Joan Crawford. There she stunned the world while performing some amazing bike tricks, predating the International BMX Federation by a decade. Watch the video below.-

The post Video of the Day: First Recorded BMX, Flatland-Style Bike Tricks appeared first on Sound On Sight.
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘Late Show With David Letterman’ Cue Card Writer Fired After Assault

‘Late Show With David Letterman’ Cue Card Writer Fired After Assault
A longtime “Late Show With David Letterman” cue card writer has been fired after physically assaulting a staff writer and insulting Letterman, according to the New York Post.

Tony Mendez, 69, whom regular viewers may recognize from the occasional shot on the show, had an argument with Letterman and staff writer and 15-time Emmy nominee Bill Scheft on Oct. 8 over changes to cue cards.

As they were discussing the changes in Letterman’s dressing room, Scheft reportedly interrupted Mendez, who yelled, “I know what I’m doing! Get off my back.”

Letterman then accused Mendez of having a sour disposition, which Mendez did not take well to.

“You’re the one who has the sour disposition, motherfucker,” he responded.

Mendez, who had worked on the show for 21 years, went home overnight following the argument. When he came back the next day, however, he grabbed Scheft by his shirt and pushed him against a wall.
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Blue Jasmine,’ ‘Hunger Games’ Among Costume Design Winners

‘Blue Jasmine,’ ‘Hunger Games’ Among Costume Design Winners
Elaborate designs and covetable fashion were the focuses of the 2014 Costume Designers Guild Awards on February 22 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where winners included “Behind the Candelabra’s” Ellen Mirojnick, “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’s” Trish Summerville, “House of Cards’” Tom Broecker, and “Blue Jasmine’s” Suzy Benzinger.

This is all a little ironic, Cdg president Salvador Perez joked his opening remarks.

“As costume designers, we take on the formidable task of dressing thousands of actors for a crowd scene or giving an actor 30 changes for one 30-minute episode of television,” the “Mindy Project” costume designer said. “Even though we can pull it off on a daily basis, let’s be honest. When it comes to dressing ourselves, the shoemakers’ children have no shoes. My tuxedo hem? Safety pins and Topstick.”

Scandal’s” Joshua Malina hosted the ceremony, where accolades were also given to veteran costume designers April Ferry and Sharon Day,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

‘Blue Jasmine,’ ‘Hunger Games’ Among Costume Design Winners

‘Blue Jasmine,’ ‘Hunger Games’ Among Costume Design Winners
Elaborate designs and covetable fashion were the focuses of the 2014 Costume Designers Guild Awards on February 22 at the Beverly Hilton Hotel, where winners included “Behind the Candelabra’s” Ellen Mirojnick, “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire’s” Trish Summerville, “House of Cards’” Tom Broecker, and “Blue Jasmine’s” Suzy Benzinger.

This is all a little ironic, Cdg president Salvador Perez joked his opening remarks.

“As costume designers, we take on the formidable task of dressing thousands of actors for a crowd scene or giving an actor 30 changes for one 30-minute episode of television,” the “Mindy Project” costume designer said. “Even though we can pull it off on a daily basis, let’s be honest. When it comes to dressing ourselves, the shoemakers’ children have no shoes. My tuxedo hem? Safety pins and Topstick.”

Scandal’s” Joshua Malina hosted the ceremony, where accolades were also given to veteran costume designers April Ferry and Sharon Day,
See full article at Variety - TV News »

R.I.P. Eydie Gorme

The singer and classic TV performer has died at the age of 84. Eydie Gorme passed away on today in Las Vegas after a short undisclosed illness. A well known nightclub performer in New York, Gorme joined Steve Allen’s local TV show in 1953. She soon was partnered with another singer on the show Steve Lawrence and the duo moved upward with Allen in 1954 when his show became NBC’s Tonight Show in 1954. The couple married on December 29, 1957. The next year, The Steve Lawrence and Eydie Gorme Show debuted on NBC and lasted one season. Still, both solo and with Lawrence, the Grammy winner would show up on the small screen often over the next three decades. Gorme appeared on the Gary Moore Show, What’s My Line?, Password All-Stars, The Ed Sullivan Show, The Bob Hope Show, the Carol Burnett Show among other. As well as a big music hit
See full article at Deadline TV »

Not Fade Away (2013) – The Review

Ah, the lure of sweet, sweet nostalgia. Television has been lured many times by her siren call with “Happy Days”, “The Wonder Years”, and “Mad Men”. Several film directors have indulged in this desire to return to simpler times (usually in their own younger years) from George Lucas’s American Graffiti and Woody Allen’s Radio Days. Although it should be noted that Allen had his biggest box office success with 2011′s Midnight In Paris, which could be considered an anti-nostalgia flick (turns out that the people from the era you longed for also longed for an earlier time). Now TV mastermind David Chase, creator of “The Sopranos”, follows Lucas in returning to the golden 60′s in his feature film directing debut Not Fade Away. Music played a major role in the 1973 classic about California cruisers and music factors into Chase’s story of East Coast pals. But instead of
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Review: Rock 'N' Roll Dreams Are Fleeting & Familiar In David Chase's Uneven 'Not Fade Away'

The following article is a reprint of our review that ran during the New York Film Festival. For a film that’s ostensibly set to the vibrant pulse of early ‘60s rock 'n' roll and blues -- The Rolling Stones, the early Beatles, Bo Diddley, etc. -- David Chase’s directorial debut, “Not Fade Away,” sure has a curious, circuitous and eventually long-winded tempo. Set in 1964, just a few months after the Kennedy assassination with Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement and the sexual revolution in the air, “The Sopranos” creator’s ambitions are decidedly simpler and much more small scale. The set up is simple: The Rolling Stones make their U.S. television premiere on “The Hollywood Palace” in the summer of 1964 and three best friends from the suburbs of New Jersey -- Douglas (John Magaro), Eugene (Jack Huston from “Boardwalk Empire”) and Wells (Will Brill) -- enthralled with their swaggery blues beat,
See full article at The Playlist »

What's The Word On 'Not Fade Away'?

What's The Word On 'Not Fade Away'?
-- As drummer in a forgotten New Jersey band in the 1960s, David Chase never got close – never even got close to close – to making it in music. Yet from a sound check of his rock-infused HBO series "The Sopranos," it's clear the music never faded away.

So what better way for the TV revolutionary to make his film directing debut than with a story that's all about the music? Chase's "Not Fade Away" – a somewhat autobiographical drama about a Jersey boy playing drums in a `60s band and dreaming of stardom – would be called a promising first feature from some unknown filmmaker doing the rounds at Sundance. Coming from a Hollywood heavyweight who's spent decades in the TV trenches, it's a hopeful sign, or maybe just wishful thinking, that more of the quality that has fled film for television might somehow be channeled back to the big-screen.

"Not Fade Away" is a sweet,
See full article at Huffington Post »

Nyff Review: Rock 'N' Roll Dreams Are Fleeting & Familiar In David Chase's Uneven 'Not Fade Away'

For a film that’s ostensibly set to the vibrant pulse of early ‘60s rock 'n' roll and blues -- The Rolling Stones, the early Beatles, Bo Diddley, etc. -- David Chase’s directorial debut, “Not Fade Away,” sure has a curious, circuitous and eventually long-winded tempo. Set in 1964, just a few months after the Kennedy assassination with Vietnam, the Civil Rights movement and the sexual revolution in the air, “The Sopranos” creator’s ambitions are decidedly simpler and much more small scale. The set up is simple: The Rolling Stones make their U.S. television premiere on “The Hollywood Palace” in the summer of 1964 and three best friends from the suburbs of New Jersey -- Douglas (John Magaro), Eugene (Jack Huston from “Boardwalk Empire”) and Wells (Will Brill) -- enthralled with their swaggery blues beat, are compelled to form a rock band (Joe Patuto, played by Brahm Vaccarella joins
See full article at The Playlist »

Voice Of “Lost In Space” Dick Tufeld Passes Away

Voice Of “Lost In Space” Dick Tufeld Passes Away
Dick Tufeld, announcer and voice actor perhaps most well known as the vocal cords behind the Robot in Lost In Space, has passed away. Tufeld was a survivor of cancer, and suffered from Parkinson’s disease. He was 85 years old.

Tufeld’s notable contributions include: The Amazing Mr. Malone, Falstaff’S Fables, Space Patrol, Three Star Final, Zorro, Walt Disney’S Wonderful World Of Color, Surfside 6, The Hollywood Palace, The Julie Andrews Hour, Time Tunnel, and Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea.
See full article at Famous Monsters of Filmland »

Weekend Shopping Guide 12/17/10: Townies

  • Quick Stop
The weekend’s here. You’ve just been paid, and it’s burning a hole in your pocket. What’s a pop culture geek to do? In hopes of steering you in the right direction to blow some of that hard-earned cash, it’s time for the Fred Weekend Shopping Guide - your spotlight on the things you didn’t even know you wanted…

(Please support Fred by using the links below to make any impulse purchases - it helps to keep us going…)

If The Departed was Scorsese’s attempt to get a hold on Boston, Ben Affleck’s The Town (Warner Bros., Not Rated, Blu-Ray-$35.99 Srp) is a homegrown take on the intricate web of Goodfellas, right down to a heist that ultimately tears everyone apart. Sure, it’s a simplistic view of a remarkably good flick, but why don’t you give it a spin for yourself?
See full article at Quick Stop »

The Rolling Stones Invade America: Wake-Up Video

No matter how huge a band gets, there are always speed bumps along the way. Pick a massive rock band — the Beatles, Green Day, U2 — and you'll find any number of slip-ups, dead ends and minor disasters littering the side of the road on the route to worldwide dominance. Such was the case of the Rolling Stones, who began their first ever tour of the United States on this day in 1964, and the results were cagey at best.

When the tour began, the group had only just released an album in the United States (the U.S.-only England's Newest Hitmakers arrived in stores at the end of May), which meant that their exposure was limited and the gigs less than prestigious. In one notorious incident, the band performed on an episode of "The Hollywood Palace," which was a variety show hosted by Dean Martin. The group did not play well,
See full article at MTV Newsroom »

See also

External Sites