8.6/10
152
4 user 2 critic

The Hollywood Palace 

Various guest hosts present a musical variety show.
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7   6   5   4   3   2   1  
1970   1969   1968   1967   1966   1965   … See all »
Won 1 Primetime Emmy. Another 9 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Himself - Host 32 episodes, 1964-1970
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 Himself - Host / ... 17 episodes, 1965-1970
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 Himself - Host / ... 15 episodes, 1964-1970
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Storyline

Popular, long-running Saturday night variety show of the mid-to-late 1960's, originating from the Hollywood Palace Theater (formerly the El Capitan) on Hollywood Boulevard. There was a revolving guest host, usually a singer or comedian, each week. Bing Crosby was the most frequent guest host (including, of course, the Christmas Week show), but other frequent guest hosts included Sammy Davis, Jr., Jimmy Durante, Don Adams, Fred Astaire, and Judy Garland. The Rolling Stones made their first U.S. TV appearence on the show in 1964. The waning popularity of weekly variety shows contributed to "Hollywood Palace" being cancelled in early 1970, but it's still well-remembered by its many fans. Written by Bob Sorrentino

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

variety show | See All (1) »

Taglines:

From Hollywood, The Entertainment Capital of the world. ABC-TV presents "The Hollywood Palace!"

Genres:

Comedy | Family | Music

Certificate:

TV-G
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Details

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Release Date:

4 January 1964 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Color:

(1964-1965)| (1965-1970)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

All the "acts" performing on the Hollywood Palace television show were video-recorded and performed on the HP stage, or in the adjacent parking lot, with only one exception. Converting the ABC TV stage-studio into a color facility during the summer of 1966 shut the stage down. Vanoff booked Dame Margot Fonteyn and Rudolf Nureyev for the third season, third show hosted by Fred Astaire. Only available during the month of June, 1966, the Proscenium was duplicated by ABC Scenic Services, and sets built for their performance of the Black Swan pas de deux, from the Swan Lake ballet. These scenic elements, including the stage's apron brass footlights, were shipped and set up at the CBS Television City Studios, Beverly Blvd at Fairfax in Hollywood. Rehearsing the dance on the CBS stage, Nureyev and Fonteyn found the standard shiny gray vinyl floor "impossible to perform upon". Hub Braden covering the taping, had the CBS construction/scenic shop replace the vinyl with a 4'x8' Masonite sheets, which were turned over, reversing the shiny finish to the material's backside pebble texture. Accepting this substituted dance floor, Fonteyn and Nureyev performed their segment with Astaire introducing them from his Hollywood Palace proscenium host area. The segment was placed in ABC's Bank Vault until the show was taped and edited, airing October 2, 1966. See more »

Connections

Featured in Hanging with Batman (2014) See more »

Soundtracks

Put On A Happy Face
Written by Gower and Margie Champion
Performed by the Les Brown Orchestra and then the Mitchell Ayres Orchestra and the Mort Lindsey Orchestra
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User Reviews

Great long-running variety show
22 October 2005 | by See all my reviews

Whatever happened to the variety show? Where today can you see acts like Senior Wences ('sawrrright? 'SAWRRRIGHT!); the guy who spun plates on fiber-glass poles to the tune of Khachaturian's "Neighbor's Dance"; the harmonica group who dressed in liederhosen and the midget went around biting everyone in the knee when he got kneed out by the other performers; the guy who tried to get his dog to jump through the hoop and the dog, instead, would slowly droop to the floor anemically; Carl Ballantine, the magician who had everything go wrong in his magic act; all those comedians and impressionists; the juggling acts; the acrobat acts; and a plethora of other folks who did acts in nightclubs and show rooms all over America? This was the place. We didn't get Ed Sullivan in our town during my early years, but we DID get the Hollywood Palace - on Saturday nights at 9 p.m. - just before "The Outer Limits" aired at 10 p.m.

The theme song was "Put On a Happy Face," played brightly by an off-stage orchestra (originally led by Les Brown). It was a pre-recorded show with a live audience, much like Ed Sullivan, except it had several guest hosts, largely consisting of Bing Crosby and Don Adams.

I remember it as the introduction of Raquel Welch to America. Raquel would come out each week and place a placard on an easel introducing the next act. If I'm not mistaken, she began on the show coming out in something akin to a Bunny suit (as in Playboy Bunny outfit minus the ears) with dark stockings? Anyway, I miss these types of shows. Steve Harvey is the closest thing to this type of show and it's a shame. It's just not "all that" in comparison to "The Hollywood Palace."


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