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Tystnaden
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The Silence (1963) More at IMDbPro »Tystnaden (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
8.0/10   9,913 votes »
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Director:
Writer:
Ingmar Bergman (writer)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Silence on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
3 February 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
BERGMAN at his most POWERFUL! SHOCKING! BOLD!
Plot:
"The Silence" is about the emotional distance between two sisters. The younger one is still attractive enough to pick up a lover in a strange city... See more » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
3 wins & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
This is Bergman at his most disturbing. See more (37 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Ingrid Thulin ... Ester
Gunnel Lindblom ... Anna
Birger Malmsten ... The Bartender
Håkan Jahnberg ... The Waiter
Jörgen Lindström ... Johan
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Lissi Alandh ... Woman in Variety Hall (uncredited)
Karl-Arne Bergman ... The Paperboy (uncredited)
Leif Forstenberg ... Man in Variety Hall (uncredited)
Eduardo Gutiérrez ... Impressario (uncredited)
Eskil Kalling ... The Bar Owner (uncredited)
Birger Lensander ... The Doorkeeper (uncredited)
Kristina Olausson ... Anna (uncredited)
Nils Waldt ... The Cashier (uncredited)
Olof Widgren ... The Old Man (uncredited)

Directed by
Ingmar Bergman 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Ingmar Bergman  writer

Produced by
Allan Ekelund .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Ivan Renliden (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Sven Nykvist 
 
Film Editing by
Ulla Ryghe 
 
Production Design by
P.A. Lundgren 
 
Costume Design by
Marik Vos-Lundh  (as Marik Vos)
Bertha Sånnell (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Börje Lundh .... makeup artist
Gullan Westfelt .... assistant makeup artist
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Lenn Hjortzberg .... assistant director
Lars-Erik Liedholm .... assistant director
 
Art Department
Karl-Arne Bergman .... property master (as Karl Arne Bergman)
 
Sound Department
Stig Flodin .... sound
Olle Jacobsson .... sound mixer (as Olle Jakobsson)
Bo Leverén .... sound
Tage Sjöberg .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Evald Andersson .... special effects
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Rolf Holmquist .... assistant camera (as Rolf Holmqvist)
Harry Kampf .... still photographer
Peter Wester .... assistant camera
Gerhard Carlsson .... electrician (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Lars-Owe Carlberg .... location manager
Katinka Faragó .... script supervisor (as Katherina Faragó)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Tystnaden" - Sweden (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
96 min
Country:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (AGA Sound System)
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Finland:K-18 (uncut) (2004) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1965) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1964) | Finland:K-16 (cut) (1963) | France:-12 | Netherlands:18 (orginal rating) | Norway:16 (cut) | Norway:18 (1970) | Sweden:15 | UK:15 | UK:X (original rating) | USA:R | West Germany:18 (f) (original rating) | West Germany:16 (f) (re-rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The controversy the film acquired for being sexually explicit resulted in a much larger audience than most Bergman pictures. When Bergman realized this, he commented that it had attracted the most unwanted viewers of any of his pictures.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Johan:[points to a sign] What does that mean?
Ester:I don't know.
See more »
Soundtrack:
Sing, Baby, SingSee more »

FAQ

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52 out of 62 people found the following review useful.
This is Bergman at his most disturbing., 2 April 2003
Author: Audun Bråten (braugen@hotmail.com) from Oslo, Norway

"Tystnaden", "The Silence", is perhaps Bergman's most disturbing film without the shocking images of, say "Cries and Whispers" and "Fanny and Alexander". It is more the atmosphere and what is not said that makes this film so uncomfortable to watch, but that is one of the things I love about the cinema- to be shocked, moved and disturbed by the images. I can understand why some people, my mother for example, do not like Bergman, but I believe he is a great artist and one of the true canonic directors we have, along with the likes of Dreyer, Mizoguchi, Fellini, Tarkovsky and Kubrick (just to mention a few!).

Bergman's women shine in this film, too, although they must have been exhausted afterwards. Ingrid Thulin and Gunnel Lindblom star as the two sisters, whose apparent incestuous relationship has destroyed them both, Esther (Thulin) physically (she is dying) and Anna (Lindblom) mentally. They arrive, with Anna's son Johan, in a foreign city at war, which creates an uncozy atmosphere around Sven Nykvist's exterior shots. The tanks roll down the city streets, becoming a metaphor of the war of emotions between Anna and Esther. Thulin makes a very physically demanding performance, like Harriet Andersson in "Cries and Whispers" she is dying (of cancer?), and her pain is showing. Anna clearly wants to hurt her sister, who is the oldest and smartest of them, by saying cruel things and playing with Esther's apparent sexual love for her.

Sigmund Freud would have loved this film, and Anna seems to want to break free from her sister by having casual sex with a man she meets at a bar. She then tells her sister about it, and Esther's reactions to this is extremely ambiguous, like most of the film is. Anna's wish to become free of her sister is deeply rooted in childhood experiences, and it leads Anna to say things like "I wish she was dead" to the man who does not understand a word she is saying. All these things make "Tystnaden" the disturbing film it is. The only release is when Johan explores the corridors of the hotel alone, meeting a bunch of short men who perform at a circus-like variete Anna visits to escape from the sight of Esther. But Johan meets a kind (or is he a paedophiliac?) old man who works at the hotel, and it is he who has to care for Esther as she draws her last breaths, Anna tearing Johan away from her sister's arm in a very cruel manner. The long periods of silence in the film perhaps makes the title, or perhaps it means that the silence about the sisters' past is never broken to us, the spectators. A lot is left up to us to interpret, typically of Bergman's cinema.

All in all, a very ambivalent, Freudian and disturbing film from one of the masters of the cinema.

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Message Boards

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