IMDb > The Trial (1962)
Le procès
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The Trial (1962) More at IMDbPro »Le procès (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.9/10   12,534 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Pierre Cholot (adaptation)
Franz Kafka (based on the novel by)
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Trial on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
30 March 1963 (Italy) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
An unassuming office worker is arrested and stands trial, but he is never made aware of his charges. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
User Reviews:
The Best Legal Drama or Paranoia Film Ever Made See more (97 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Anthony Perkins ... Josef K.

Arnoldo Foà ... Inspector A
Jess Hahn ... Second Assistant Inspector
Billy Kearns ... First Assistant Inspector (as William Kearns)
Madeleine Robinson ... Mrs. Grubach

Jeanne Moreau ... Marika Burstner
Maurice Teynac ... Deputy Manager
Naydra Shore ... Irmie
Suzanne Flon ... Miss Pittl
Raoul Delfosse ... Policeman
Jean-Claude Rémoleux ... Policeman
Max Buchsbaum ... Examining Magistrate
Carl Studer ... Man in Leather (as Karl Studer)
Max Haufler ... Uncle Max

Romy Schneider ... Leni

Fernand Ledoux ... Chief Clerk of the Law Court

Akim Tamiroff ... Bloch

Elsa Martinelli ... Hilda
Thomas Holtzmann ... Bert the Law Student
Wolfgang Reichmann ... Courtroom Guard
William Chappell ... Titorelli

Michael Lonsdale ... Priest

Orson Welles ... Albert Hastler - The Advocate / Narrator
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Guy Grosso ... Josef K.'s Colleague (uncredited)
Paola Mori ... Court Archivist (uncredited)

Directed by
Orson Welles 
 
Writing credits
Pierre Cholot (adaptation and dialogue)

Franz Kafka (based on the novel by)

Orson Welles (written by)

Produced by
Robert Florat .... associate producer
Alexander Salkind .... producer (as Alexandre Salkind)
Michael Salkind .... producer (as Michel Salkind)
 
Original Music by
Jean Ledrut 
 
Cinematography by
Edmond Richard (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Yvonne Martin 
Frederick Muller  (as Fritz H. Muller)
Orson Welles (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Jean Mandaroux 
 
Costume Design by
Helen Thibault (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Louis Dor .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Robert Florat .... production manager
Paul Laffargue .... assistant: director of production
Emile Blondé .... assistant unit manager (uncredited)
Philippe Dubail .... assistant unit manager (uncredited)
Jacques Pignier .... unit manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Marc Maurette .... assistant director
Sophie Becker .... assistant director (uncredited)
Paul Seban .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Jean Bourlier .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Jacques Brizzio .... assistant art director (uncredited)
Madame Brunet .... dresser (uncredited)
Jean Charpentier .... upholsterer (uncredited)
Francine Coureau .... upholsterer (uncredited)
Jacques D'Ovidio .... assistant art director (uncredited)
André Labussière .... set dresser (uncredited)
Claudie Thary .... dresser (uncredited)
Pierre Tyberghein .... assistant art director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Jacques Lebreton .... sound mixer
Guy Villette .... sound
Julien Coutelier .... sound (uncredited)
Urbain Loiseau .... assistant sound (uncredited)
Guy Maillet .... assistant sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Denise Baby .... special effects editor (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Adolphe Charlet .... camera operator
Roger Corbeau .... still photographer
Max Dulac .... assistant camera
Robert Fraisse .... second assistant camera (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Andrea Gargano .... final colorist (uncredited)
Roberto Perpignani .... assistant editor (uncredited)
Gérard Pollicand .... associate editor (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Tomaso Albinoni .... composer: additional music
Jean Ledrut .... music arranger (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Alexander Alexeieff .... creator: prologue scenes on "Pin-screen" (as Alexandre Alexeieff)
Yves Laplanche .... promoter
Claire Parker .... creator: prologue scenes on "Pin-screen"
Jacques Pignier .... administrator
Alexander Salkind .... presenter
Jacques Brua .... accountant (uncredited)
Sonia Bunodiere .... production secretary (uncredited)
Pierre Bénichou .... press attache (uncredited)
Paul Bürks .... voice dubbing (uncredited)
Henry Dutrannoy .... production administrator (uncredited)
Marie-José Kling .... script supervisor (uncredited)
Florence Malraux .... press attache (uncredited)
Guy Maugin .... location manager (uncredited)
André Nicard .... publicist (uncredited)
Gisèle Pellet-Collet .... production secretary (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsSpecial Effects
  • Lax (optical effects: Prologue)
Other Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Le procès" - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
119 min | USA:107 min (TV version : 1984)
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.66 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Optiphone) (source format)
Certification:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The "pin-screen," also called the "pin-board," used in the opening and closing sequences was invented by Alexander Alexeieff in the early 1930's. It is a board with pins stuck in it at regular intervals. The pins can be raised or lowered to form an image, which can then be lit and photographed. By manipulating the pins and photographing them one frame at a time, the device can be used for animation, and though it was not so used in "The Trial" Alexeieff and Claire Parker made at least two short animated films using the pin-screen, _nuit sur le mont chauve, Une (1933)_ and Le nez (1963).See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: When Josef K. follows Hilda being carried out of the large trial room/hall by the law student, he hastily grabs and throws on his suit jacket. In the succeeding scenes, the jacket's buttons which are buttoned changes.See more »
Quotes:
[first lines]
Narrator:Before the law, there stands a guard. A man comes from the country, begging admittance to the law. But the guard cannot admit him. May he hope to enter at a later time? That is possible, said the guard. The man tries to peer through the entrance. He'd been taught that the law was to be accessible to every man...
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Adagio in GSee more »

FAQ

How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
Is "The Trial" based on a book?
Is the novel available for reading online?
See more »
84 out of 96 people found the following review useful.
The Best Legal Drama or Paranoia Film Ever Made, 18 April 2004
Author: StudlyFoxie from Boston, Mass

Like most people, I've read Kafka. "The Trial" was one of the books I read for credit during high-school. I always thought it was a good book that did a great job depicting a reality based around a state of mind. While I liked the book and held it in high esteem compared to other literature I'd read, it couldn't prepare me for the incredible experience of Orson Welles's great adaptation "The Trial" ("Le Proces"). The man who once delivered the best movie ever made (in America) to a major studio made this masterpiece on almost no money and limited resources in two European countries with no sets.

Norman Bates himself, Anthony Perkins turns in a convincing performance as Joseph K. K awakes one morning to find the police in his apartment arresting him without taking him into custody or telling him what he's charged with. People come and go from the room with a creepy, unnatural ere that makes it all seem less real. Every aspect of K's life becomes warped as he realizes everyone expects him to behave differently but he isn't sure how and his attempts to correct himself get him deeper into trouble. He's lead to a secret meeting that turns out to be his hearing which turns out to be a mockery. K gets a lawyer, played by Welles himself (who has one of the best entrances in screen history here), but he turns out to more of a villain than a deliverance. Every woman K meets is attracted to him, presumably because he's accused. Our hero is a marked man who can't understand the game and is appalled by the rules. As K ventures deeper into the secrets of the mysterious legal system he becomes more and more convinced that he is doomed and for no reason at all. The movie builds to an astounding climax that fits the dream tone perfectly and surpasses any expectations.

"The Trial" is set in an unnamed country in a city composed of decaying industrial buildings, old factories, shady tenements, and empty streets. Welles filmed much of this in an abandoned train station in Paris and the ad-hoc location proves to be the perfect psychological landscape. Welles took Kafka's paranoia over the persecution of Jews and updated it to a post-war setting where the law is the enemy of every man, or as in this case, the everyman. This is no mere portrait of fascism or communism, but a condemnation of abuses of the law everywhere. The landscape is highly engaging, and some modern buildings are thrown in the mix, perhaps to remind the viewer that this could happen here in America, too. "The Trial" is one of the most memorable settings in screen history and Welles gives us a taste of its terrors from lofty heights to claustrophobic depths.

Welles always said that the dialogue was priority number one, and here every scrap of it is memorable. In spite of the spectacular lines, the visual style is awe inspiring and it's a bit shocking to consider that this was the end of production that Welles never planned. The look is very film noir, like a 50s detective picture, but darker, almost to the point of being horror. This movie runs on fear, but maintains dramatic pathos and a sense of humor that help it rise above other films with that intention. People call Welles's films "style over substance", but if you watch the opening bedroom scene, you'll agree that this film kept them in harmony.

Akim Tamiroff ("Ocean's 11") and Romy Schneider ("What's New Pussycat") shine in supporting roles as the lawyers subordinates, slaves who play inside the rules to save themselves. They help to flesh his out as not merely an adaptation of Kafka's work, but an expanded drama, brought to life with the skill of Shakespeare and a lens worthy of Hitchcock. This is more than a parable, it's a human drama that bathes in pure expressions of fear and depression.

"The Trial" is easily the best film of its year if not of that decade. It should be seen by fans of good film and by audiences in general "because tomorrow, or someday soon, it could happen to you!"

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severely underated and overlooked? Ageispolis
HELP! enlighten me bcapaul84
Petition Criterion for a Blu-Ray? MiloMindbender
To all of you who have read the book MillSwe
A nothing film. matrix5904
Are there REALLY NO symbols in this film? deshovel
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