IMDb > Contempt (1963)
Le mépris
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Contempt (1963) More at IMDbPro »Le mépris (original title)

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Contempt -- Open-ended Trailer from Criterion

Overview

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7.8/10   17,062 votes »
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View company contact information for Contempt on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
18 December 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Bardot at her bold, bare and brazen best! Reveling in Rome, cavorting in Capri...jolting even the jaded international jet-set in her pursuit of love! [UK Theatrical] See more »
Plot:
Screenwriter Paul Javal's marriage to his wife Camille disintegrates during movie production as she spends time with the producer. Layered conflicts between art and business ensue. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
User Reviews:
Film within a film within a film (infinity) See more (120 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Jean-Luc Godard 
 
Writing credits
(in alphabetical order)
Jean-Luc Godard  uncredited
Alberto Moravia  novel "Il Disprezzo"

Produced by
Georges de Beauregard .... producer
Carlo Ponti .... producer
Joseph E. Levine .... producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Georges Delerue 
Piero Piccioni (Italian and Spanish version)
 
Cinematography by
Raoul Coutard 
 
Film Editing by
Agnès Guillemot 
Lila Lakshmanan (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Tanine Autré (uncredited)
 
Makeup Department
Odette Berroyer .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Philippe Dussart .... production manager
Carlo Lastricati .... production manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Charles L. Bitsch .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
William Robert Sivel .... sound (as William Sivel)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Joe D'Amato .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Alain Levent .... director of photography: second unit (uncredited)
Roger Robert .... grip (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Annie Chauvet .... publicist (uncredited)
Suzanne Schiffman .... script girl (uncredited)
Bertrand Tavernier .... publicist (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Le mépris" - France (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
103 min | Finland:97 min | USA:102 min | Italy:82 min (re-edited version) (cut)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Argentina:16 | Australia:PG | Brazil:16 | Chile:18 | Finland:K-16 | France:U | Germany:6 (re-rating) (2002) | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | Sweden:11 | UK:15 | UK:AA (original rating) | USA:Not Rated | West Germany:18 (original rating) (w) | West Germany:16 (re-rating) (199?) (VHS release)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Contrary to the myth that Jean-Luc Godard makes films without a screenplay, there was a script for Contempt (1963) and it ran to 132 pages.See more »
Goofs:
Incorrectly regarded as goofs: It is possible that all "mistakes" in the film that involve visible equipment are intentional, or at least intentionally uncorrected: the film, after all, is about the artificiality of making a film, and the initial credit sequence shows filmmakers shooting the film itself.See more »
Quotes:
Paul Javal:I like CinemaScope very much.
Fritz Lang:Oh, it wasn't meant for human beings. Just for snakes - and funerals.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Le coup du mepris (1964) (TV)See more »

FAQ

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36 out of 47 people found the following review useful.
Film within a film within a film (infinity), 8 April 2008
Author: Graham Greene from United Kingdom

With Le Mepris (1963), French filmmaker Jean Luc Godard strings together at least three different narrative strands, each of which are in some way connected to the central story of a couple falling out of love, and all further set against an additional thematic backdrop of film-making and ancient Greek mythology. With this technique, Godard is clearly attempting to not only present us with a vicious satire on the business of movie-making, but also attempting to deconstruct the very notion of film-making by contrasting the soulless and mechanical approach to studio production, with the trials and tribulations of a torturous love affair.

As with the vast majority of Godard's work - particularly of this era - Le Mepris is very much a work in the meta-film tradition; in the sense that it is a film about film-making that is constantly reminding the audience of its own artificiality and manufactured design. This ideology is evident right from the start, as Godard begins the film with a lengthy tracking shot, which finds the camera following in front of a camera actually within the film and also in the middle of a similarly complicated tracking shot. To add further ideas of self-reflexivity to the proceedings, Godard appears himself as the film's assistant director, with his cinematographer Raoul Coutard manning the equipment. As the shot progresses, a cold and emotionless voice-over beings narrating the opening credits - though no text appears on screen - whilst the camera continues tracking towards us, edging closer to us until both camera and audience are starring directly into one other and the endless abyss that they represent.

It's pure Brechtian deconstruction, years before Godard would refine the influence of Brecht with the difficult masterpiece Week End (1967), which shares some elements familiar from Le Mepris, in particular the use of the couple as a metaphorical reference point for some kind of greater ideology and a natural continuation of many of the film-making techniques that Godard had been developing since A Woman Is A Woman (1961). This brings us to the story at hand, with Le Mepris focusing on a jaded scriptwriter (Michel Piccoli) setting out to polish the screenplay for Fritz Lang's big budget adaptation of Homer's epic, The Odyssey. From this set up we are introduced to the writer's beautiful and enchanting girlfriend (Brigitte Bardot), the arrogant U.S. film producer (Jack Palance), and the great man himself, Fritz Lang.

Each of these four characters will be involved in their own separate strand of the narrative that will run concurrently alongside the other characters, whilst in turn, laying reference points to the likes of Ulysses, The Odyssey, Fellini and The Rite of Spring, to create the overall foundation of the film itself. This is only the first quarter of the film and already Godard is churning out exciting idea after exciting idea to smash apart the worn clichés and generally accepted limitations of film in a way that is as startling, boring, joyous and confusing as anything else he has directed. The visual design is just splendid, with Godard and Coutard moving further away from the Nouvelle Vague/Cinéma-vérité influences of their earliest work and incorporating beautifully vivid primary colours, the use of cinema-scope, complex and seemingly random tracking shots and camera movements and sporadic bursts of music to disarm the viewer during moments of dialog.

The centrepiece here is the near-infamous twenty-minute long sequence that takes place between the writer and his girlfriend in their vast, open-plan apartment, in which jealousies, bitterness and petty arguments blow up and cool off amidst a series of seemingly mundane, everyday-like activities. What makes the scene work is Godard's far from invisible directorial intent, as he attempts to excite, bore and eventually move the audience into becoming interested in these complicated and far from conventional characters whilst simultaneously using the set up to offer a skillful deconstruction of his own film's narrative, the narrative of Homer's Odyssey, and the film that Lang is making. This ties into the further film-within-a-film-within-a-film (infinity) abstractions, with Godard continually making allusions to the idea that the film we are watching could easily be a film being made.

The film also works in a circular sense, opening with that aforementioned scene in which Godard points the barrel of the lens directly into the audience whilst narrating his own credits, whilst the final shots shows the camera drifting off towards the sunset as Godard yells "cut". With Le Mepris, Godard clearly struck the right balance of cinematic invention; beautiful photography, use of colour, costumes and music, a recreation of Cinecittà as a pastoral ghost town (a comment on film-making in itself), etc, whilst achieving a subtle symbiosis between his characters, his narrative and his philosophical subtext. For me, this is perhaps the strongest 'narrative' film the director ever made before abandoning generic storytelling and instead striving for greater artistic substance.

I suppose in this day and age it is easy to look back on Godard's once radical use of cinematic experimentation - and his genuine desire to challenge the medium of film far beyond the usual presentation of conventions like character and narrative - and see it as something that is hollow and dated; a pseudo-intellectual exercise in cinematic deconstruction that is there to be endured, as opposed to enjoyed. Though this may still be true for some viewers - particularly those at odds with Godard's personal style and the very 60's idea that art could be entertainment and that anything was possible - there will be other viewers who are far more in tune with the notion of cinema for cinema's sake, and can better appreciate the film for what it truly is.

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