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Los muertos no perdonan (1963)

 -  Horror | Mystery
4.3
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Ratings: 4.3/10 from 19 users  
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A parapsychology student investigates his father's death.

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(screenplay), (story), 2 more credits »
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Title: Los muertos no perdonan (1963)

Los muertos no perdonan (1963) on IMDb 4.3/10

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Javier Escrivá ...
Javier Alcaraz
Luis Prendes ...
Pablo Laínez
May Heatherly ...
Marta (as May Hetherly)
Paco Morán ...
Gálvez (as Francisco Morán)
Alberto Dalbés ...
Antonio León
Antonio Molino Rojo ...
Inspector Solandes
María Vico
Conchita Goyanes ...
Chica invitada al castillo
Juan Tabernero
José Villasante
María Dolores Díaz
María Saavedra
Fernando Liger
Cris Huerta ...
Doctor
Luz Romero
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Storyline

A parapsychology student investigates his father's death.

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Genres:

Horror | Mystery

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Los muertos no perdonan  »

Box Office

Gross:

ESP 2,797,111 (Spain)
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User Reviews

 
the most heterodox suspenseful films of the incipient 1960s by Julio Coll
8 March 2013 | by (Spain) – See all my reviews

The nonconformity and good work of Julio Coll led him to put in place one of the most heterodox suspenseful films of the incipient 1960s: The dead do not forgive. The film, written and directed by himself proposes an interesting suspense plot that largely flirts with elements of fantasy films. For this, the filmmaker puts us in a very singular story: a young medical student (Luis Escrivá), interested in parapsychology, has a strange feeling about the death of his father. Aided by a professor, he try to prove that his father was murdered.

The first sequence of the film shows three of us traveling to the mountains of Peru in search of a uranium deposit. Coll reflects the loneliness of the desert through generous panoramic landscapes, in turn, contrasts with the face screwed men, close-ups that reinforce a voice-over we stated that the idea of murder is inside the head of one of them. The documentary style of the home, at that moment take a look sickly, and Julio Coll gaze becomes the "adventure film" of the issue in a series of dive shots that accentuate the feeling of despair and doom.

While the murder of a man inevitably is consumed, across the ocean, the child can hear the cry for help from his father. After an introduction that leads the protagonist to convince his extraordinary extrasensory powers, the plot takes us to a castle where the two survivors of the expedition lead a life of luxury and opulence after the loot found enriched in uranium deposit. The young medical student (Luis Escrivá) moves to the place and takes over a position as archivist in the library of the castle while working as a practitioner in the nearest town. His only obsession is to unmask the murderer and his buddy.

It is in the labyrinthine rooms of the old castle, which deploys Coll best arts as a filmmaker. The director strives to build great frames that play with architectural levels, mirrors and doors, thus providing an excellent depth of field where they place their protagonists. The presence of one of these characters, the new landlord's wife, played by May Heatherly, is the center of an interesting subplot that puts a woman on stage last dissolute rough and rambling: persistent translation of the sick mind of the murderer, is her husband.

Julio Coll exploits that idea precisely because of its attractive staging, between obscurantist and unreal. The escapades of the young through the world of madness and hatred surrounding her husband is excellently accentuated by the gorgeous sexy soundtrack composer Jose Sola: a piece of jazz style that elegantly underlines the status of the film noir film The plot, very concise, leads us to an excellent climax: once highlighted murderer's brutal cynicism and decay of conscience, the confrontation between the two men is inevitable. A fierce struggle will end the life of the young doctor, whose body is thrown into a furnace.

In a brilliant moment of Julio Coll Writing, and prior to the fatal outcome, the young doctor explains his executioner a gruesome medieval legend: that one of the customs of the place was to tie the bodies of the victims in chains his murderers to death of these. Julio Coll puts into the mouth of the young doctor this popular legend and spear against his future murderer. Despite the fatal outcome, the curse seems to take shape, for a while after, and in the presence of some guests, the young murderer appears before her, his face covered in bandages to consummate his revenge beyond death.

Due to the low permeability of the censorship issues esoteric ism. The elements of witchcraft and ghostly should not be more than suggested (in this case is limited to the young extrasensory power) and then take the viewer to a logical explanation. The screenplay by J. Coll works in this regard as an excellent timepiece clears the doubts by some relevant explanatory flashbacks that highlight the mechanics of illusion of a script that can not get out a shred of relevant rationalism.


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