IMDb > Lord of the Flies (1963)
Lord of the Flies
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Lord of the Flies (1963) More at IMDbPro »

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Lord of the Flies -- The story of thirty English schoolboys stranded on an uncharted island at the start of the "next" war, Lord of the Flies is a seminal film of the New American Cinema and a fascinating anti-Hollywood experiment. In his daring translation of William Golding's novel, director Peter Brook found the cinematic "evidence" of the author's terrifying thesis: there is a beast in us all.
Lord of the Flies -- Shipwrecked on an island, the castaway boys eventually revert to savagery despite the few rational kids' attempts to prevent that.

Overview

User Rating:
7.0/10   13,081 votes »
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Popularity: ?
Up 8% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
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View company contact information for Lord of the Flies on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
13 August 1963 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Evil is inherent in the human mind, whatever innocence may cloak it...
Plot:
Lost on an island, young survivors of a plane crash eventually revert to savagery despite the few rational boys' attempts to prevent that. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
1 win & 1 nomination See more »
NewsDesk:
(9 articles)
Man, God and ‘Island Life’
 (From Keyframe. 18 November 2014, 6:00 AM, PST)

News Shorts: April 16th 2013
 (From Dark Horizons. 16 April 2013, 8:19 AM, PDT)

Criterion Collection Teases 2013 Releases with “Name That Movie” Art
 (From Collider.com. 1 January 2013, 2:01 PM, PST)

User Reviews:
Society's child lost in Utopia. See more (98 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)
James Aubrey ... Ralph
Tom Chapin ... Jack
Hugh Edwards ... Piggy
Roger Elwin ... Roger
Tom Gaman ... Simon
Roger Allan ... Piers
David Brunjes ... Donald
Peter Davy ... Peter
Kent Fletcher ... Percival Wemys Madison

Nicholas Hammond ... Robert
Christopher Harris ... Bill
Alan Heaps ... Neville
Jonathan Heaps ... Howard
Burnes Hollyman ... Douglas
Andrew Horne ... Matthew
Richard Horne ... Lance
Timothy Horne ... Leslie
Peter Ksiezopolski ... Francis
Anthony McCall-Judson ... Morris
Malcolm Rodker ... Harold
David St. Clair ... George
Rene Sanfiorenzo Jr. ... Charles
Jeremy Scuse ... Rowland
John Stableford ... Digby
David Surtees ... Sam, twin (as The Surtees Twins)
Simon Surtees ... Eric - twin (as The Surtees Twins)
Nicholas Valkenburg ... Rupert
Patrick Valkenburg ... Robin
Edward Valencia ... Frederick
John Walsh ... Michael
David Walsh ... Percy
Jeremy Willis ... Henry
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Toby Robertson ... Naval Officer (uncredited)

Directed by
Peter Brook 
 
Writing credits
William Golding (novel)

Peter Brook  writer (uncredited)

Produced by
Lewis M. Allen .... producer (as Lewis Allen)
Gerald Feil .... associate producer
Al Hine .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Raymond Leppard 
 
Cinematography by
Tom Hollyman (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Peter Brook 
Gerald Feil 
Jean-Claude Lubtchansky 
 
Casting by
Terry Fay 
Michael Macdonald  (as Michael MacDonald)
 
Makeup Department
Lydia Rodriguez .... makeup supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Toby Robertson .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Leslie Colombani .... sound assistant
Carter Harman .... sound recordist
James Townsend .... sound supervisor
 
Camera and Electrical Department
George Berrios .... first camera assistant
Leslie Colombani .... lighting assistant
Gerald Feil .... photographer
Tom Hollyman .... photographer
Miguel Nazario .... second camera assistant
John Walsh .... clapper boy
 
Casting Department
Barbara Hodgdon .... casting assistant: Washington
Jean Hollyman .... casting assistant
Dolores Keator .... casting assistant: Jamaica
Stella Maude .... casting assistant: London
Fiona St. Clair .... casting assistant: Puerto Rico (as Fiona St Clair)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Susan Fletcher .... wardrobe supervisor
 
Editorial Department
Nell Cox .... assistant editor
Liliane Korb .... assistant editor
Solange Lubtchansky .... assistant editor
Stella Maude .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Raymond Leppard .... conductor (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Lewis M. Allen .... presenter (as Lewis Allen)
Phil Crawshaw .... general assistant
Dana Hodgdon .... presenter
Sesyle Joslin .... general assistant
David Korda .... general assistant
Stella Maude .... script supervisor
Sheila More .... title designer
Guy Neale .... title designer
Digby Turpin .... title designer
Edwin Wilson .... assistant to producer
Elinor Wright .... assistant to producer
M.J. Bogdanowicz .... technical consultant (uncredited)
Cynthia Keith .... registered nurse (uncredited)
 
Crew believed to be complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
92 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-11 | Germany:12 | Iceland:12 | UK:X (original rating) | UK:PG (tv rating) | UK:PG (video rating) | USA:Not Rated | USA:TV-14 (TV rating)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
During post-production in Paris, the director Peter Brook and editor Gerald Feil couldn't get the right effect for the sound of the dead pilot's parachute blowing in the wind. The book called for a 'plopping noise', and nothing seemed to sound right. Eventually Gerry found the perfect sound by slowing down a recording of his cat purring.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: In at least one place the plaintive cry of the mourning dove can be clearly heard. This common North American bird is not found in the Pacific islands where the story takes place, but reflects the fact that the film was shot in the Caribbean.See more »
Quotes:
Piggy:[as the boys are talking about the beast] I don't believe in no ghosts, ever.
Jack:Who cares what YOU believe, Fatty!
[the boys laugh]
Simon:[looking disturbed] Maybe there IS a beast.
[the boys laugh again]
Ralph:Hear him! He's got the conch.
Simon:What I mean is... maybe, it's only us.
Piggy:Nuts!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Kyrie EleisonSee more »

FAQ

What is 'Lord of the Flies' about?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
How does the movie end?
See more »
71 out of 76 people found the following review useful.
Society's child lost in Utopia., 10 May 2001
Author: gary brumburgh (gbrumburgh@aol.com) from Los Angeles, California

What kid did not fantasize, at one time or another, being left alone, completely unsupervised, for a long, long, LONG period of time? To be allowed to say or do whatever he pleased, whenever he pleased. To eat anything he wanted, to go to bed late, to not go to school, to act or behave as he pleased without reproach. To be his own adult. Usually those kind of thoughts permeated our little minds right after a heavy-duty punishment. In 1990's "Home Alone," we saw a broad, comical take on this fantasy. With 1963's "Lord of the Flies," we get to experience the flip side.

"Lord of the Flies" was required reading in junior high school. William Golding's dark, sobering allegory, set during wartime London, tells the story of a large group of young schoolboys airlifted out of England who are left to their own devices after a plane crash leaves them marooned on an uninhabited isle with no surviving adults. As the boys struggle to adapt to their crude but strangely exotic "Robinson Crusoe" existence, the troop begins to splinter into two opposing sects after failing to come to terms on an autonomous code of ethics. Most of the boys decide to revel in their unsupervised freedom, reverting to primitive, animal-like behavior while resorting to barbaric acts and ritualistic practices. A conch shell becomes the embodiment of power; a boar's head a symbol of lordly conquest. On the other side, a minority group try to repel the tempting force of evil by forming a more civilized commune. Eventually the "survival of the fittest" factor sets in as the anointed leader of the hostile group incites violence to force an autocracy.

Golding's fascinating premise certainly does not hold much hope for the future of mankind. We are conditioned as a people to be civilized; it is an acquired trait, NOT an inherent trait – according to the author. And if and when the shackles of goodness and purity are at any time removed to the extent that we are allowed to become our own social and moral dictator, we will invariably revert back to what comes naturally. And with a child, who has been less-conditioned, it will take little time at all. Evil is stronger, easier, and much more seductive. When playing "good guys and bad guys" as a kid, which did YOU prefer to be?

Boasting a surprisingly natural cast of amateur actors and directed by radical stage director Peter Brook ("Marat/Sade"), this lowbudget British effort impressively captures much of the novel's back-to-nature symbolism that I found so powerful and fascinating. The young masters representing good and evil, James Aubrey ("Ralph") and Tom Chapin ("Jack"), effectively portray the resolute leaders of the two disparate tribes, while butterball Hugh Edwards as the bespectacled, philosophical "Piggy" and towheaded Tom Gaman as the quietly sensitive "Simon" are touching as two of the weaker followers who become likely targets of the surrounding chaos and burgeoning brutality. What I love most about this cast is that they act like little boys, not little actors, grounding their often awkward actions and behaviors in reality. Trivia note: one of the secondary boy players is none other than Nicholas Hammond, who went on to play young Friedrich in the film classic "The Sound of Music" two years later.

Brook's use of grainy black-and-white photography, plus the lack of any comprehensive musical score (remember Tom Hanks' "Castaway"?), accentuates the bleakness of its surroundings and feelings of isolation. The movie can hardly be expected to capture fully every single intention of this highly complex novel (most don't), but it does respect Golding's words and captures the very essence of what he wanted to say. For that alone it should be applauded.

By the way, don't waste your time on the 1990 color remake featuring "professionals" like Balthazar Getty. The poetic beauty is all but dissipated in this haphazard, jarringly Americanized update. It makes me worship Peter Brook's version even more.

And what story could BE more disturbing yet topical than "The Lord of the Flies" as it applies to today's "latch-key" society?

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ralph or jack? billybutts
Just saw this movie... BrunoB78
Sound out of sync in opening credits suferia
Piggy's name jokiwi
Things I Could Never Figure Out About This Movie... timmaninaz
Awful Film. My second 1/10 ever. sdsigma
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