Lilies of the Field (1963) - News Poster

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Here's the Moment Sidney Poitier Inspired Oprah to Become, Well, Oprah

  • Popsugar
Image Source: Getty / Paul Drinkwater As the stars descended upon Los Angeles for the 75th annual Golden Globe Awards, there was one speech we were already impatiently waiting to hear: Oprah Winfrey's acceptance speech for the Cecil B. DeMille Award. Of course, Oprah inspired and empowered us, speaking about sexual harassment, the #MeToo and Time's Up movements, and the future for women and, well, everyone from this day forward. One of her biggest moments from the speech, however, was focused on the past and the actor who inspired her to want to achieve greatness: Sidney Poitier. "In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother's house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th Academy Awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history: 'The winner is Sidney Poitier.' Up to the
See full article at Popsugar »

Golden Globes 2018: Women Rule and Men Hide

Oprah talking to the press after the ceremony: Variety/YouTube

After all the post-mortems are finished, last night’s Golden Globes ceremony will be remembered as the night that the women in Hollywood stood up to the powers that be and said Time’s Up. The black outfits — which were everywhere — were a sight to behold on the red carpet. The unity of the women in Hollywood was the theme on the carpet and in the auditorium.

I remember a generation ago when I watched the women who created the Hollywood Women’s Political Caucus work together to raise money for pro-choice female candidates. They were the political women in Hollywood at that moment. Now, a new diverse generation of women are taking up the mantle and pushing Hollywood to change.

For all the people saying that dresses are not enough: last night was about way more than dresses. Last
See full article at Women and Hollywood »

Read Oprah Winfrey's Powerful Golden Globes Speech in Full: 'A New Day Is on the Horizon'

Read Oprah Winfrey's Powerful Golden Globes Speech in Full: 'A New Day Is on the Horizon'
Oprah Winfrey dominated the 2018 Golden Globe awards with a powerful speech as she accepted the Cecil B. DeMille Award at Sunday’s ceremony.

When accepting the honorary award for outstanding contributions to the world of entertainment., Winfrey, 63, delivered a show-stopping speech filled with somber moments, standing ovations, past memories and the story of Recy Taylor, a Black woman who never received justice after being abducted and gang-raped by six white men in Alabama.

Read the full speech below:

In 1964, I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

Oprah Winfrey’s Entire Golden Globes Speech

Oprah Winfrey’s Entire Golden Globes Speech
Accepting the Cecil B. DeMille award at the 75th Golden Globes, Oprah delivered a powerhouse speech to an almost silent room. Landing line after line Oprah schooled the audience in history referencing Recy Taylor and expressing deep gratitude “to all the women who have endured years of abuse and assault because they, like my mother, had children to feed and bills to pay and dreams to pursue.”

But perhaps the biggest cheer in the room was heard after Oprah addressed the men who use their power to silence women with a warning, “their time is up.”

Here is the full transcript and video of her speech here:

In 1964 I was a little girl sitting on the linoleum floor of my mother’s house in Milwaukee watching Anne Bancroft present the Oscar for best actor at the 36th academy awards. She opened the envelope and said five words that literally made history, ‘the winner
See full article at Variety - Film News »

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

One of the best pictures to come out of Hollywood in the late 1960s, Sydney Pollack’s screen version of Horace McCoy’s hardboiled novel is a harrowing experience guaranteed to elicit extreme responses. Jane Fonda performs (!) at the top of an ensemble of stars suffering in a Depression-Era circle of Hell – it’s an Annihilating Drama with a high polish. And this CineSavant review ends with a fact-bomb that ought to start Barbara Steele fans off on a new vault search.

They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1969 / Color / 2:35 widescreen 1:37 flat Academy / 120 min. / Street Date September 5, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Jane Fonda, Michael Sarrazin, Susannah York, Gig Young, Red Buttons, Bonnie Bedelia, Bruce Dern, Allyn Ann McLerie.

Cinematography: Philip H. Lathrop

Production Designer: Harry Horner

Film Editor: Fredric Steinkamp

Written by James Poe, Robert E. Thompson from the novel They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Good riddance, August!

Uff. what an unpleasant month this is / that was! The world continued to go insane, people are still denying climate change despite more and more frequent tragedies like what's happening in Texas and, on a more personal level, at Tfe HQ your host Nathaniel threw his back out most severely. As a result the blogging was less prolific. Now that recovery is finding some momentum (crosses fingers) expect a return to normalcy after the Labor Day holiday. First up: The Toronto International Film Festival, our favorite annual event that isn't awards show related.

Icymi a dozen highlights From August

• Grace & Frankie's Costumes - Emmy nominated and deservedly so

• Best Actress in a Limited Series - the hottest Emmy category. Who to vote for?

• Sunset Blvd Musical Movie Rumors - the most discussed post of the month

• Best Screen Owls oh, the randomness!

• Soundtracking: The First Wives Club - you don't own them!
See full article at FilmExperience »

1963 Convo Pt 2: Lilies of the Field

Previously, in this '63 Party:

The Supporting Actress Smackdown 

Podcast Conversation Part 1

To close out our little Oscar 1963 celebration, Nathaniel talks Lilies of the Field and more with this month's panel: Teo Bugbee, Keiran Scarlett, Séan McGovern, and Brian Mullin

Smackdown '63 Companion Podcast Part 2

(42 minutes)

In which we wrap up our discussion of big budget airport trifle The VIPs. Then the panel has differing opinions on the merits of the classic feelgood Lilies of the Field. Also up for discussion: Sidney Poitier's unique spot in Hollywood history, Denzel Washington comparisons, and an aside to Alfred Hitchcock and The Birds. And, as we say our goodbyes, we each offer up one must-see film from 1963 that we hope you'll watch.

You can listen to the podcast here at the bottom of the post or download from iTunes. Continue the conversations in the comments, won't you? 
See full article at FilmExperience »

On This Day: Basquiat, Last Temptation, Cleopatra

on this day in history as it relates to showbiz

30 BC Cleopatra commits suicide, allegedly by purposeful snake bite. I don't remember that scene in Liz Taylor's Cleopatra but it might have been at the four hour mark and t'was possibly asleep

How to honor this day: play with someone's snake. In the absence of a suitable one, wink at someone as saucily as Liz

← 1915 "Of Human Bondage" by W Somerset Maugham published. 19 years later it becomes a movie and marks Bette Davis's ascent to superstar actress

How to honor this day: Let it all out like Bette in that performance that's pure
See full article at FilmExperience »

Meet the Panelists - Smackdown '63

The Supporting Actress Smackdown of '63 is just 3 days away. So it's time to get your votes in on the nominees that year. Readers, collectively, are the final panelist, so grade the nominees (only the ones you've seen) from 1 to 5 hearts. Your votes count toward the smackdown win!

Diane Cilento Tom Jones Edith Evans Tom Jones Joyce Redman Tom Jones

Margaret Rutherford The VIPs

Lilia Skala Lilies of the Field

Now that we're finally getting to this long delayed Smackdown. It's time to meet this month's talking heads...

The Panel

Seán McGovern and Brian Mullin

An Irishman and an American based in London, Seán McGovern and Brian Mullin are the hosts of Broad Appeal, the podcast that looks back at female-driven films from the not-so-distant past. Seán is a film festival programmer with Fringe! Queer Film & Arts Fest and has also worked for the BFI and the National Film and Television School.
See full article at FilmExperience »

Vintage '63

The Supporting Actress Smackdown 1963 Edition arrives on Monday so let's talk context since we haven't revisited as much of 1963 as we'd hoped to...

Great Big Box Office Hits: 1) Cleopatra 2) How the West Was Won 3) It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World 4) Tom Jones 4) Irma La Douce 6) Son of Flubber 7) The Birds 8) Dr No 9) The VIPs 10) McClintock!

Oscar's Best Pictures: Tom Jones (10 noms / 4 wins), Cleopatra (9 noms / 4 wins), How the West Was Won (8 noms / 3 wins), Lilies of the Field (5 noms / 1 win), America America (4 noms / 1 win) Our theory as to what was just outside the Best Picture shortlist plus more '63 goodies follow...
See full article at FilmExperience »

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance

Volcano is Fearless Finney Showcase: L.A. Screening with Bisset in Attendance
'Under the Volcano' screening: John Huston's 'quality' comeback featuring daring Albert Finney tour de force As part of its John Huston film series, the UCLA Film & Television Archive will be presenting the 1984 drama Under the Volcano, starring Albert Finney, Jacqueline Bisset, and Anthony Andrews, on July 21 at 7:30 p.m. at the Billy Wilder Theater in the Los Angeles suburb of Westwood. Jacqueline Bisset is expected to be in attendance. Huston was 77, and suffering from emphysema for several years, when he returned to Mexico – the setting of both The Treasure of the Sierra Madre and The Night of the Iguana – to direct 28-year-old newcomer Guy Gallo's adaptation of English poet and novelist Malcolm Lowry's 1947 semi-autobiographical novel Under the Volcano, which until then had reportedly defied the screenwriting abilities of numerous professionals. Appropriately set on the Day of the Dead – 1938 – in the fictitious Mexican town of Quauhnahuac (the fact that it sounds like Cuernavaca
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Jamie Foxx Reveals Oprah Winfrey Staged an Intervention During His Hard Partying Days Before His Oscar Win

Jamie Foxx Reveals Oprah Winfrey Staged an Intervention During His Hard Partying Days Before His Oscar Win
Jamie Foxx is opening up about how Oprah Winfrey helped him through a particularly difficult time in his life.

Sitting down on Howard Stern's SiriusXM radio show on Tuesday, Foxx revealed how the beloved media mogul actually staged an intervention for him when his wild partying threatened to consume his career in the months following the release of the 2004 biopic Ray.

"I'm having such a good time and I'm not knowing I'm f**king up," Foxx told Stern, referring to the hard-drinking, indulgent lifestyle he fell into during the 2004-2005 awards season, when he was the odds-on favorite to win the Oscar.

Watch: Rewinding to Jamie Foxx's Early Career

Foxx, who said he was "doing every f**king think you could possibly imagine" at the time, revealed that he eventually received an unexpected call from Winfrey, who told him, "You're blowing it."

"[She said], 'All of this gallivanting and all this kind of s**t, that's not what
See full article at Entertainment Tonight »

The Best Of The Best – The Greatest Cinematographers and the Films that made them great

Author: Dave Roper

So, we come to the end of this particular series. We’ve covered a number of aspects of the creative input into film-making, including actors, actresses, writers composers, and directors (in two parts). We’ve stopped short of costume, make-up, special effects, art design and others, however our final stop is Cinematography. The Dop exerts plenty of influence over the look of the film. Yes, lighting, production design and the director’s vision are key too, but the consistency and persistence with which certain directors stick with and return to a trusted Dop shows just how much they contribute.

Darius KhondjiSeven

Seven has a unique visual aesthetic. Plenty of films have gone for the “always raining, always dark” approach, but contrast Seven with something like AvP: Requiem for a shining example of how hard it is to pull off effectively. And contrast is the word. Seven
See full article at HeyUGuys »

Jerry Goldsmith Receives a Star on the Walk of Fame

Jerry Goldsmith Receives a Star on the Walk of Fame
When Joe Dante was asked about supporting the effort to secure a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for Jerry Goldsmith, the director – who had worked with the respected composer on nine films over 20 years – said he was “flabbergasted” to realize Goldsmith didn’t already have one.

On May 9, the Oscar- and Emmy-winning composer of such classics as “Chinatown,” “Planet of the Apes,” “Patton” and dozens more will receive his star, posthumously, on Hollywood Boulevard just east of Highland Avenue. Goldsmith died in 2004.

Dante, for whom Goldsmith scored “Gremlins,” “Explorers,” “Innerspace” and other films, cited “his brilliance and versatility. Any film he scored was automatically improved tenfold.”

Few filmmakers would disagree. Paul Verhoeven, who did “Total Recall,” “Basic Instinct” and “Hollow Man” with Goldsmith, recalls: “Every film was a new adventure, as Jerry was able to adapt to the most diverse narratives and styles. He never repeated himself, always looking for new,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier Makes Rare Public Appearance as TCM Celebrates In the Heat of the Night’s 50th Anniversary

Hollywood Icon Sidney Poitier Makes Rare Public Appearance as TCM Celebrates In the Heat of the Night’s 50th Anniversary
Academy Award-winning actor Sidney Poitier made a rare public appearance on Thursday at the TCM Classic Film Festival to take in a celebratory 50th-anniversary screening of one of his most enduring and iconic films, In the Heat of the Night.

In the audience at Hollywood’s Chinese Theater during opening night festivities of the classic movie cable channel’s annual film festival, Poitier, 90, rose for a sustained standing ovation that roared for several minutes prior to the screening of the groundbreaking 1967 film.

Made at the height of civil rights tensions in America, Poitier played Philadelphia homicide detective Virgil Tibbs, who
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

‘In the Heat of the Night’ Turns 50: Why This Police Classic Still Thrills — TCM Fest

‘In the Heat of the Night’ Turns 50: Why This Police Classic Still Thrills — TCM Fest
Ever wonder why “In the Heat of the Night” beat “The Graduate” and “Bonnie and Clyde” for Best Picture Oscar in 1968? Well, as Bobby Kennedy told director Norman Jewison when he presented the movie with the New York Film Critics Award, “Norman, timing is everything.”

It’s hard to believe that the movie came out 50 years ago. Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger lit up the screen in the racially-charged murder mystery that not only captured the Civil Rights zeitgeist but also delivered a damn good drama. On April 6, the TCM Classic Film Festival celebrates that anniversary with a gala opening night screening at the Chinese Theatre IMAX on Hollywood Boulevard, attended by Jewison, Poitier, producer Walter Mirisch, Lee Grant, and composer Quincy Jones.

Considered an underdog that year, “Heat” took home five Oscars, including Best Actor for Steiger, Stirling Siliphant’s Best Adapted Screenplay, Hal Ashby’s Editing, and Sound Mixing.
See full article at Indiewire »

Just How Many Black Actors Have Won an Oscar? The Number Is Disturbingly Low

  • BuzzSugar
Image Source: Getty / Lee Celano The Oscars have been plagued by obvious race issues since they began in 1929, and things seemingly came to a head with the #OscarsSoWhite discussion a couple of years ago; the overwhelming lack of diversity in nominees in both 2015 and 2016 resulted in Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs taking bigger, more noticeable steps to double the number of diverse members in its voting body by 2020. Nevertheless, a black actor (the incomparable Sidney Poitier) wasn't awarded until 1964, and it was only in 2002 that Halle Berry became the first black woman to win a best actress trophy. At this year's ceremony, Mahershala Ali and Viola Davis won for their supporting roles, adding to a pretty short list. So, just how many black actors have won Oscars over the years? Sixteen. A whopping sixteen distinguished, talented people in 89 years. Scroll through to see who they are and learn about the records they've broken.
See full article at BuzzSugar »

Sidney Poitier Turns 90: Inside the Actor, Activist and Diplomat’s Incredible Life

Sidney Poitier Turns 90: Inside the Actor, Activist and Diplomat’s Incredible Life
Legendary filmmaker, activist and human-rights trailblazer Sidney Poitier can now add “nonagenarian” to his list of accomplishments.

The two-time Academy Award winner turned 90 on Monday, and celebrated the milestone with friends and family, including his wife, Joanna Shimkus, whom he married in 1976, as well as six daughters, Beverly, Pamela, Sherri, Gina, Anika and Sydney. He also has eight grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

Poitier, who made a career out of defying expectations, began his life beating the odds. The actor was born two months premature in Miami in 1927 to a pair of poor immigrant farmers from the Bahamas, and the likelihood
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Smackdown Returns: Which Years Should We Cover?

Last year's Supporting Actress Smackdown season was way too short with only two episodes so we're starting much earlier this year and aiming for at least 5 or 6 from spring to summer.

Stitch & Bitch with Supporting Actress Shortlists February through August!

Friday February 17th - Best Supporting Actress 2016

Nominees Tba. Since the smackdown is normally a retrospective we will probably approach this 'in-the-moment' event differently but we're still brainstorming.

Friday March 31st - Best Supporting Actress 1963  

We've been promising this year forever so we are going to force ourselves through it which should be easier than its been since its only three films! The nominees: Margaret Rutherford in The VIPs, Lilia Skalia in Lilies of the Field and three of Albert Finney's co-stars in Tom Jones: Diane Cilento, Joyce Redman, and '60s Oscar fixture Dame Edith Evans

But what shall we do for April through August (finale)? You get
See full article at FilmExperience »

Mark Burnett and Roma Downey to Launch Faith-Based Network

  • The Wrap
Mark Burnett and Roma Downey to Launch Faith-Based Network
Mark Burnett and Roma Downey are set to launch faith- and family-based network Light TV. In partnership with Fox stations and affiliates, it’ll debut next month. Light TV will not air linearly, however, it’ll run on Fox TV’s digital sub-channels. The network will feature wholesome entertainment programming, like MGM’s “Are You Smarter than a 5th Grader,” “Rocky,” “Hoosiers,” “Red River,” “Little Man Tate,” “The Nutcracker,” “Lilies of the Field,” “Chitty Chitty Bang Bang,” “The Black Stallion,” “All Dogs Go To Heaven,” “Pink Panther,” “Fame” and “Mr. Mom.” Light TV will also air acquisitions like “Highway to Heaven” and “Heartland.
See full article at The Wrap »
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