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Ieri, oggi, domani
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Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963) More at IMDbPro »Ieri, oggi, domani (original title)

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Overview

User Rating:
7.3/10   3,628 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Eduardo De Filippo (story) (segment "Adelina") and
Eduardo De Filippo (screenplay) (segment "Adelina") ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 March 1964 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Together! The Most Rib-Tickling Team Since Adam and Eve! See more »
Plot:
Stories about three very different women and the men they attract. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 6 wins & 3 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
Today and forever, a fresh film See more (20 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Sophia Loren ... Adelina Sbaratti / Anna Molteni / Mara

Marcello Mastroianni ... Carmine Sbaratti / Renzo / Augusto Rusconi
Aldo Giuffrè ... Pasquale Nardella (segment "Adelina")
Agostino Salvietti ... Dr. Verace (segment "Adelina")
Lino Mattera ... Amedeo Scapece (segment "Adelina")
Tecla Scarano ... Verace's sister (segment "Adelina")
Silvia Monelli ... Elivira Nardella (segment "Adelina")
Carlo Croccolo ... Auctioneer (segment "Adelina")
Pasquale Cennamo ... Chief Police (segment "Adelina")
Tonino Cianci ... (segment "Adelina") (as Antonio Cianci)
Armando Trovajoli ... Giorgio Ferrario (segment "Anna")
Tina Pica ... Grandmother Ferrario (segment "Mara")
Gianni Ridolfi ... Umberto (segment "Mara") (as Giovanni Ridolfi)
Gennaro Di Gregorio ... Grandfather (segment "Mara")

Directed by
Vittorio De Sica 
 
Writing credits
Eduardo De Filippo (segment "Adelina") story and
Eduardo De Filippo (segment "Adelina") screenplay &
Isabella Quarantotti (segment "Adelina") screenplay

Alberto Moravia (segment "Anna") novella "Troppo Ricca" and
Cesare Zavattini (segment "Anna") screenplay &
Bella Billa (segment "Anna") screenplay &
Lorenza Zanuso (segment "Anna") screenplay

Cesare Zavattini (segment "Mara") story and
Cesare Zavattini (segment "Mara") screenplay

Produced by
Carlo Ponti .... producer
 
Original Music by
Armando Trovajoli 
 
Cinematography by
Giuseppe Rotunno 
 
Film Editing by
Adriana Novelli 
 
Production Design by
Ezio Frigerio 
 
Costume Design by
Piero Tosi 
 
Production Management
Mario Abussi .... production supervisor: Naples
Antonio Altoviti .... general manager
Mario Di Biase .... production supervisor: Rome and Milan
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Luisa Alessandri .... assistant director
Nino Segurini .... assistant director (as Antonio Segurini)
 
Art Department
Andrea Crisanti .... assistant art director
 
Sound Department
Ennio Sensi .... sound supervisor
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Aldo Bonifazi .... key grip
Giuseppe Di Biase .... assistant camera
Giuseppe Maccari .... camera operator
Luciano Tovoli .... assistant camera (as Luciano Tavoli)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Cesare Rovatti .... costume assistant (as Cesare Rovati)
 
Editorial Department
Marisa Letti .... assistant editor
 
Music Department
Armando Trovajoli .... conductor
 
Other crew
Carla Fierro .... script girl
Matteo Spinola .... publicist
 

Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Ieri, oggi, domani" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
Argentina:118 min | France:118 min | Netherlands:117 min | USA:119 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.35 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The limousine featured in part II ("Anna") was a 1963 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud III Convertible.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: As Anna and Renzo talk while driving, the windshield of her Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud II shakes because the little side windows are gone, but the little side windows are intact in the wide shots.See more »
Quotes:
Carmine Sbaratti:The people of Forcella are out of this world. They've risen up in a gesture of solidarity!
Verace's sister:I must say, it almost makes you forget how filthy and ignorant they are.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Girlfriend in a Coma (2012)See more »
Soundtrack:
Core 'ngratoSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
28 out of 34 people found the following review useful.
Today and forever, a fresh film, 10 September 2002
Author: acerf from California

An amusing, verging on wonderful film movie that is unfortunately compromised by the dub; Loren speaks perfect English and Mastroianni - whose beautiful voice is a star turn in itself, knew enough to acquit himself. Instead we get some pretty unconvincing American Speakers.

Adelina of Naples. This segment of the film is a fictionalized take on true events 10 years earlier. Lauren is the principal breadwinner for her family, selling black market cigarettes and committing other illegal acts to make ends meet. To avoid jail, she merely need remain pregnant which her semi-employed husband Carmine (Mastroianni), is expected to chip in with. The rub however, is that the shoe factory next door has, for several years, kept the poor man awake so that after 8 or so other siblings, he simply is not the race horse he used to be. Chastised by his wife for his weakness, Mastroianni despairs while Adelina (almost) produces number nine with Carmine's best friend; luckily nothing happens.

Lauren's luck and the appeal processes are eventually exhausted, Adelina does go to a jail that better frankly, than the average Motel 6. Carmine, in the mean time, contacts the press and the Pope, really everyone, and finally, Sophia is sprung. During her internment, Mastroianni apparently recovers his strength and the movie ends with the certainties that he `got his thang back,' and that, at least to 1963 eyes, things in Naples would never change.

At the time the movie was lauded for its unsubtle criticism of the Catholic Church's birth control policies, policies, which it was reasoned, contributed to high birth rates, poverty, apathy and - laziness of Naples. Arguably the best segment of the movie and by far the longest.

Anna Of Milan

The weakest of the three segments, though not without charm. This segment basically has no plot whatsoever. Sophia Lauren is Anna, a rich, bored woman who has married an industrialist and has time and amore to spare, especially as her rich husband travels. A lot.

Mastroianni plays Renzo ,a writer with a curious haircut and a raincoat, a man appalled by Lauren's focus on money, yet still a man! Come on; we're talking Sophia Lauren..

One fine Sunday, the pair travel to the country in her new Rolls (this episode is almost a commercial for that particular brand) Renzo passing the time chiding Anna for her materialism in between bouts of desire. Lauren insists that she wants to go somewhere, anywhere to get away from all `this.' Really she insists, she could give up money at any time and as a token of her good faith on this point - allows Mastroianni to drive.

Eventually, overwhelmed by so much woman and horsepower, Renzo crashes, almost killing a child selling flowers on the roadside. The Rolls' in flames, Anna flips out, her only concern the car, she even insists that use HIS clothes to douse the flames!

Returned to her senses by the crash, Anna shows through her anger that her true love is the Lira, especially when she rides off into the Milanese sunset with another swinger - a short guy in a Lancia. The Rolls abandoned for repairs on the roadside, Renzo buys some flowers from the almost run-over little flower peddler who asks if it's `really a Rolls?'

The day's stock results are announced on the Roll's radio as Mastroianni walks bemusedly out of camera, (very effective shot) discarding the flowers on the roadside. While too obvious - `money is the poison of today,' the curious scenery and some fine acting, make this episode enjoyable, if lightweight.

Mara Of Rome

This famous episode stars Lauren as Mara, an upscale hooker and is frankly, hilarious and a treat for the eyes. What incredibly beautiful cinematography this episode employs!

There are two themes in this episode: Mastroianni's `Rusconi,' son of a wealthy industrialist from Bologna is wild about Mara - and the camera by the way is wild about Mastroianni, who is murderously handsome. Unfortunately, something always arises to interrupt his love - especially the second theme, namely: The crush on Mara of her shy young neighbor, a gorgeous young man being sent to a seminary by his tiny little grandparents who seem to want him there for his own good and just maybe, their own finances.

One comic turn after another arises to prevent Rusconi's union with Mara; on one occasion, hounded on the phone by his Father in Bologna, Rusconi insists, that he is `not an idiot,' and then reminds his Dad that you have to `bribe the minister, first. That's why it is called a bribe.' Showing great capacity as a comic actor on a level with his dramatic turns, Mastroianni really puts the 'S' in star power and is hilariously funny.

Tired of the `what next?' Mastroianni swears off Mara and says he is leaving forever. In the meantime, the self-righteous Grandma next door accuses Mara of being a common whore and home-wrecker who is ruining her young man and promises to evict her. (In reality, it was the shy young man who made a Roman roof top approach, asking Lauren if she would go to the beach with him; she is non-committal.)

Enraged by the Grandma, Lauren fires back: How can anyone judge HER - after all, she is very choosy about the men she sleeps with.

Mastroianni returns - duh! stating that he kept thinking about Mara. Finally the young man's affairs are sorted - (poor Rusconi forced into action as peacekeeper) and neighborly relations, restored. As a reward, Lauren performs a very famous (and rather tame, in fact) strip tease for Rusconi, whose by-now ruined nervous system leads to a series of hilarious faces. About to dish out the REAL reward, however, Lauren recalls she has made a vow of chastity for `just two weeks'.

This segment, while perhaps overtly addressing hypocrisy (the grandparent's) is in my opinion, really about nothing but fine acting, gorgeous faces and glorious Rome. A great moment in Cinema, and by far my favorite segment.

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Message Boards

Discuss this movie with other users on IMDb message board for Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963)
Recent Posts (updated daily)User
How do you rate the three parts? stevenvh
Second part hommage to Antonioni? damien-16
Music? yabbadabbadu2
Second story, couple in limousine- written by Moravia. kuntalo
Beautiful location in Rome Pure-Form
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Remastered DVD to be realeased April 26th derek85
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