The Great Escape
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

10 items from 2014


Doctor Who: the film careers of William Hartnell & Jon Pertwee

26 March 2014 10:45 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Feature Alex Westthorp 28 Mar 2014 - 07:00

In a new series, Alex talks us through the film roles of the actors who've played the Doctor. First up, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee...

We know them best as the twelve very different incarnations of the Doctor. But all the actors who've been the star of Doctor Who, being such good all-rounders in the first place, have also had film careers. Admittedly, some CVs are more impressive than others, but this retrospective attempts to pick out some of the many worthwhile films which have starred, featured or seen a fleeting cameo by the actors who would become (or had been) the Doctor.

William Hartnell was, above all else, a film star. He is by far the most prolific film actor of the main twelve to play the Time Lord. With over 70 films to his name, summarising Hartnell's film career is difficult at best. »

- louisamellor

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Artists and Models

22 March 2014 11:53 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

1955′s Artists and Models, directed by Frank Tashlin, neatly satirizes the cold-war paranoia of the fifties (and the McCarthy hearings in particular) by focusing on a similar witch hunt, the war against comic books.

Tashlin’s film, starring Dean Martin as a failed “fine” artist reduced to drawing for comic books and Jerry Lewis as the fella who reads them, has its basis in fact (more or less): future Mad publisher William Gaines actually appeared before a 1954 Senate subcommittee on juvenile delinquency where he defended his comics line including the politico’s favorite easy target, Tales from the Crypt.

Tashlin cut his teeth directing some of the more transgressive cartoons for Columbia and Warner Bros. so it’s no surprise he’s on the side of the angels (in this case Gaines),  blasting anything in sight with a pretentious bone in its body. In Artists and Models, fine art »

- TFH Team

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Steve McQueen paves way for artists to break the boundaries

8 March 2014 4:12 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Oscar-winning director of 12 Years a Slave has pushed back the boundaries of film because of the fearlessness that comes with a background in art

When the director Steve McQueen was an art student learning basic film-making skills at Goldsmiths College, London, he joked he was already aiming for the time when his name would eclipse that of his glamorous namesake, star of The Great Escape and Bullitt. "One day," he told his tutor, Professor Will Brooker, "when people talk about Steve McQueen, I am going to be the first person they think of."

Now, with an Oscar for his film 12 Years a Slave, the transition from Turner prizewinning artist to celebrated director has been made in style. It is a path to cinematography also taken by the British artist Sam Taylor-Wood, nominated for a Turner prize in 1998 and now editing her high-profile film of the erotic bestseller Fifty Shades of Grey. »

- Vanessa Thorpe

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Something borrowed, something less than new in Alexandre Desplat’s ‘The Monuments Men’

17 February 2014 9:04 PM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

How do we make the familiar feel new again? Or to pose that same question to a cynical studio executive, how do we sell audiences more of the same? It’s no industry secret that audiences seem more likely to turn up for sequels to established properties, remakes, and recognizable genres, and George Clooney’s latest directorial effort, the World War II-set The Monuments Men, most definitely falls into that last bucket. The second World War is easily cinema’s favorite war, and even as The Monuments Men‘s “based on true events” art heist seeks to remove it from expected tropes, the story of a rag-tag team going up against the Nazis isn’t a terribly new one.

It’s within that familiarity that Alexandre Desplat sets out in scoring The Monuments Men, and from the first downbeat, Desplat’s compositions draw from prior works in their best moments »

- David Klein

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The Monuments Men Cast On “Jimmy Kimmel Live” Sneak Peek; Listen To Clips From Alexandre Desplat’s Score

5 February 2014 5:52 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Check out the sneak peek clip from this Thursday night’s episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live” featuring the cast of director/actor George Clooney’s new film, The Monuments Men, including Clooney, Bill Murray, John Goodman, Bob Balaban, Cate Blanchett, and even Kimmel’s arch-enemy, Matt Damon.

The episode also includes a new edition of “Jimmy Kimmel Live’s” famed “Mean Tweets” segment, featuring all six members of “The Monuments Men” cast reading horrible comments from social media about themselves.

5-time Oscar nominee Alexandre Desplat (The King’S Speech, Argo) composed the score for the film. As with many of his previous works, Desplat’s music takes the viewer on an exciting journey in the same way Frank De Vol did with The Dirty Dozen and Elmer Bernstein did in The Great Escape.  He totally captures the rousing themes of an old-time, big Hollywood World War II movie.

Listen to clips from the soundtrack. »

- Michelle McCue

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Cinema Retro Special Report: Paul Talbot On The Making Of Charles Bronson's "The Evil That Men Do"

1 February 2014 10:26 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Paul Talbot

The poster screamed: “Most criminals answer to the law. The world’s most savage executioner must answer to Bronson.” Since the late 1960s, Charles Bronson’s name on a marquee was a guarantee of unchained action. When The Evil That Men Do opened in 1984, fans were hit with the expected violence─but this time they were also assaulted with thick layers of sadism, sleaze and depravity. And they loved it.

Born in 1921, Charles Bronson (originally Bunchinsky) was a dirt-poor Pennsylvania coal miner before he was drafted and later used the GI Bill to study acting. After dozens of small roles, he became a popular supporting player in hit films like The Magnificent Seven (1960) and The Great Escape (1963)─then went overseas to star in European pictures like Farewell, Friend (1967), Once Upon a Time in the West (1967) and Rider on the Rain (1970). Although ignored in the States─where they »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Content taking McQueen doc to Efm

30 January 2014 5:06 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Sales on the documentary about the legendary actor to begin at the European Film Market in Berlin.

Content is to handle worldwide rights to The Man & Le Mans, a film about the struggle that late Hollywood actor Steve McQueen endured while making a feature about the famous 24-hour race.

The documentary is produced by Gabriel Clarke and Jon McKenna and Content will begin sales at the Efm in Berlin next week.  The feature will be executive produced by Motorsport consultant and former PR executive Andrew Marriott, archive producer Richard Wiseman and Content’s Jamie Carmichael.

The star of The Great Escape and Bullitt tackled a passion project in 1970, titled Le Mans, which reflected his passion for motor racing.

The documentary tells the story of a life-changing six months for McQueen, during which time director John Sturges quit the project, McQueen’s marriage fell apart and his company was on the brink of bankruptcy. He also learned »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Content Announces Steve McQueen Documentary The Man & Le Mans

30 January 2014 | Comingsoon.net | See recent Comingsoon.net news »

Content announced today that it will be handling worldwide rights to the Gabriel Clarke and John McKenna produced documentary The Man & Le Mans at the upcoming European Film Market in Berlin. The Man & Le Mans will be executive produced by Motorsport consultant and former PR executive Andrew Marriott, noted archive producer Richard Wiseman, and Content's Jamie Carmichael. By 1970, Steve McQueen ruled Hollywood. Hot off the back of classics The Magnificent Seven , The Great Escape , The Cincinnati Kid and The Thomas Crown Affair , McQueen made an indelible mark as the maverick cop in Bullitt . the movie that made car chases a staple of the movie industry. He was at the top of his game, commanding respect and wielding power; securing a six-picture deal with »

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Content Film Announces New Documentary The Man & Le Mans About Hollywood Icon Steve McQueen

30 January 2014 | The Daily BLAM! | See recent The Daily BLAM! news »

[Press Release] Los Angeles, January 30, 2014 - Content will be handling worldwide rights to the Gabriel Clarke and Jon McKenna produced documentary The Man & Le Mans at the upcoming European Film Market in Berlin. The Man & Le Mans will be executive produced by Motorsport consultant and former PR executive Andrew Marriott, noted archive producer Richard Wiseman, and Content's Jamie Carmichael. By 1970, Steve McQueen ruled Hollywood. Hot off the back of classics ‘The Magnificent Seven’, ‘The Great Escape’, ‘The Cincinnati Kid’ and ‘The Thomas Crown Affair’, McQueen made an indelible mark as the maverick cop in ‘Bullitt’ – the movie that made car chases a staple of the movie industry. He was at the top of his game, commanding respect and wielding power; securing a six-picture »

- Pietro Filipponi

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Ten Miscastings That Worked – or Nearly Worked!

23 January 2014 11:16 PM, PST | Shadowlocked | See recent Shadowlocked news »

Miscasting in films has always been a problem. A producer hires an actor thinking that he or she is perfect for a movie role only to find the opposite is true. Other times a star is hired for his box office draw but ruins an otherwise good movie because he looks completely out of place.

There have been many humdinger miscastings. You only have to laugh at John Wayne’s Genghis Khan (with Mongol moustache and gun-belt) in The Conqueror (1956), giggle at Marlon Brando’s woeful upper class twang as Fletcher Christian in Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) and cringe at Dick Van Dyke’s misbegotten cockney accent in Mary Poppins (1964). But as hilarious as these miscastings are, producers at the time didn’t think the same way, until after the event. At least they add a bit of camp value to a mediocre or downright awful movie.

In rare cases, »

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

10 items from 2014


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