IMDb > The Leopard (1963)
Il gattopardo
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The Leopard (1963) More at IMDbPro »Il gattopardo (original title)

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Overview

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8.1/10   13,275 votes »
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View company contact information for The Leopard on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
15 July 1963 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Luchino Visconti's Enduring Romantic Adventure
Plot:
The Prince of Salina, a noble aristocrat of impeccable integrity, tries to preserve his family and class amid the tumultuous social upheavals of 1860's Sicily. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 10 wins & 5 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
An ennobling experience. See more (88 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Directed by
Luchino Visconti 
 
Writing credits
Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa (novel)

Suso Cecchi D'Amico (screenplay and adaptation) &
Pasquale Festa Campanile (screenplay and adaptation) and
Enrico Medioli (screenplay and adaptation) &
Massimo Franciosa (screenplay and adaptation) and
Luchino Visconti (screenplay and adaptation)

Produced by
Goffredo Lombardo .... producer
Pietro Notarianni .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Nino Rota 
 
Cinematography by
Giuseppe Rotunno 
 
Film Editing by
Mario Serandrei 
 
Production Design by
Mario Garbuglia 
 
Set Decoration by
Laudomia Hercolani 
Giorgio Pes 
 
Costume Design by
Piero Tosi 
 
Makeup Department
Maria Angelini .... wig maker
Alberto De Rossi .... makeup artist
Amalia Paoletti .... wig maker
Giancarlo De Leonardis .... hair stylist (uncredited)
Robert J. Schiffer .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Giorgio Adriani .... production manager
Gaetano Amata .... unit manager
Riccardo Caneva .... unit manager
Roberto Cocco .... unit manager
Lamberto Pippia .... assistant unit manager
Enzo Provenzale .... production manager
Umberto Sambuco .... assistant unit manager
Bruno Sassaroli .... unit manager
Gilberto Scarpellini .... unit manager
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Albino Cocco .... first assistant director
Brad Fuller .... second assistant director
Francesco Massaro .... second assistant director
Rinaldo Ricci .... first assistant director
 
Art Department
Emilio D'Andria .... assistant set decorator
Ferdinando Giovannoni .... assistant art director
 
Sound Department
Mario Messina .... sound engineer
 
Special Effects by
Dino Galiano .... special effects technician (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Enrico Cignitti .... camera operator
Nino Cristiani .... camera operator
Giuseppe Maccari .... camera operator
G.B. Poletto .... still photographer
Francesco Brescini .... electrician (uncredited)
Bob Penn .... still photographer: special magazine assignment (uncredited)
Piero Servo .... camera loader (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Bice Brichetto .... assistant costume designer
Alessandro Gasparinetti .... wardrobe consultant
Vera Marzot .... assistant costume designer
 
Music Department
Franco Ferrara .... conductor
Franco Ferrara .... musical director
Nino Rota .... music arranger (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Stephan Iscovescu .... script supervisor
René Barjavel .... dialogue: french version (uncredited)
Isa Bellini .... voice dubbing: Anna Maria Bottini (uncredited)
Lando Buzzanca .... voice dubbing: Serge Reggiani (uncredited)
Pino Colizzi .... voice dubbing: Pierre Clémenti (uncredited)
Solveyg D'Assunta .... voice dubbing: Claudia Cardinale (uncredited)
Franco Fabrizi .... voice dubbing: Terence Hill (uncredited)
Corrado Gaipa .... voice dubbing: Burt Lancaster (uncredited)
Sydney Pollack .... dubbed version supervisor: USA (uncredited)
Carlo Sabatini .... voice dubbing: Alain Delon (uncredited)
Alberto Testa .... choreographer (uncredited)
Jacques Willemetz .... dubbing director: french version (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
"Il gattopardo" - Italy (original title)
See more »
Runtime:
187 min | Spain:151 min (cut version) | UK:161 min (cut version) | USA:165 min (cut version) | France:195 min (Cannes Film Festival) | 205 min (premiere version) | West Germany:161 min (cut version)
Country:
Language:
Color:
Color (Technicolor)
Aspect Ratio:
2.20 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Australia:M (TV rating) | Brazil:14 | Finland:K-12 | Finland:K-11 (new rating: 2001) | France:U | Germany:12 | Hong Kong:IIB | Netherlands:12 | Norway:16 (original rating) | Norway:12 (re-rating) (1985) | Portugal:M/12 | Singapore:PG | Sweden:11 | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (video rating) | USA:PG (certificate #20553) | West Germany:12 (f)
Company:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Warren Beatty flew to Rome to meet director Luchino Visconti with the possibility of playing Tancredi, but he turned it down. He later told his publicist that Visconti had been "begging him" to star in the movie.See more »
Goofs:
Miscellaneous: During one of the long shots of the journey to Donnafugata, a blur crosses the screen near the center, apparently caused by a fly crawling over the lens.See more »
Quotes:
Prince Don Fabrizio Salina:Sleep, my dear Chevalley, eternal sleep, that is what Sicilians want. And they will always resent anyone who tries to awaken them, even to bring them the most wonderful of gifts. And, between ourselves, I doubt very strongly whether this new Kingdom has very many gifts for us in its luggage...See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
I Sogni del Principe / Giovani Eroi / Partenza di Tancredi / Amore e Ambizione / Quasi In PortoSee more »

FAQ

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39 out of 56 people found the following review useful.
An ennobling experience., 23 June 2006
Author: BrentCarleton

"The Leopard" is not only one of the most accomplished films of the twentieth century, but one of the most successful adaptations of a novel to the screen. Rarely has a scenarist so effectively translated the essence of a novel without compromising the source material.

This is not to say that anyone should approach the film before the Lambedusa novel. Indeed, this film might well be considered as a companion to the book--the two being almost interdependent.

Still, the depth, richness, and complexity that Mr. Visconti achieves here justifies a lengthy treatise in and of itself. Equally important is a familiarity with the social background of the story, a piece of history destined to be lost on not a few Americans. Nonetheless, the viewer is encouraged to familiarize himself with the life, writings and allocutions of Pope Pius IX, (particularly his "Syllabus of Errors"), the campaigns of Garibaldi and Mazzini, and the criminal theft of the temporal dominion of the Papacy, effected by a variety of Socialist and Masonic cabals.

But back to Mr. Visconti's film: enough good things cannot be said of it. Often, great visual films are compared to paintings and certainly the comparison is most apt here. Each frame seems to breathe a life of its own.

One is simply staggered by the beauty of the compositions--each scenic tableaux not only intelligently employs the width of the Cinemascope screen to artistic advantage, but even manages, (as in the case, again, of a great painting) to visually probe the novel's subtext.

The casting could not be improved upon. If on paper, Burt Lancaster, seems an odd choice, (what with his Curriculum Vitae brimming with gangsters, cowboys, athletes, and acrobats) he, nonetheless fully realizes both Lambedusa and Visconti's vision, creating a man with the intelligence to see not only his own life ebbing away, but recognizing that the order he embodies, and represents is also simultaneously collapsing.

In short, Mr. Lancaster's character personifies nothing short of a tragic loss--the collapse of the noble/aristocratic and chivalric European world order, and, with it, the complex value system, and interdependent mode of decorous deportment that the value system supported, (welcome to the Welfare State, "progressivist" social engineering, and the enshrinement of the declasse.)

Though her character is tainted with arriviste origins, Claudia Cardinale enchants in her interpretation of Angelica. Note the way Mr. Visconti stages her entrance in one of the film's most memorable sequences. As the family gathers in the salon prior to a small dinner party, an anticipatory rustle signals Angelica's arrival. Framed over and through an oil lamp and spray of daisies, and underscored by a recapitulation of Nino Rota's main theme, she glides through the salon, a vision in cream taffeta, elaborate chignon, and a rose at her bosom, plainly enrapturing and even intimidating the entire party. The pitch and sincerity of her voice and diction as she greets the Prince is a marvel of growing self possession.

Miss Cardinale's beauty is of a rare order, and Alain Delon is nearly her match, with a gallantry and swagger that perfectly encapsulate Tancredi. Supporting roles from the Jesuit to Angelica's father are flawless both in type and execution.

The ball sequence defies comment. It is truly one of those things, for which the phrase, "must be seen to be believed" may be applied. The viewer can almost touch the watered silk swagged drapes, feel the swish of embroidered gowns, taste the flavored ices and blanc manges, and smell the liquored air, a waft with the heady mixture of verbena and attar of roses.

When, at the scene's near close, we behold an depleted elderly woman in green silk fanning herself in the far right side of the frame whilst some brave young things continue their exhausted dance, we seem to be viewing a Tissot come to life.

And Nino Rota must be complimented on his majestic score, the main theme of which is of heart breaking beauty and tenderness.

Ironically, "The Leopard" will scarcely find populist appeal in a country for whom MacDonalds, Wallmart, and Oprah appear to provide all that is needed or wished for. No, it is not intended to be accessible to every Tom, Dick or Harry. This would surprise neither Prince Lambedusa or Mr. Visconti.

But for those who know better--savor it! "The Leopard" seeps into one's pores like a drug, after which it demands to be seen again and again.

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They found the Waltz in a second hand store..... Spheer2002
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Ballroom sequence: how ugly they are ! xamevou
'Things have to change so that they can stay the same' Igglybuff
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Original language shirley12vineyard
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