Edit
From Russia with Love (1963) Poster

Trivia

Assistant director Kit Lambert later became a record producer and manager for the rock band The Who.
Jump to: Cameo (8) | Spoilers (11)
Sean Connery said that this movie was his personal favorite out of the Bond films he did.
Pedro Armendáriz playing the role of Kerim Bey, was terminally ill during filming with the cancer he had likely contracted while filming the notorious film The Conqueror (1956) near the site of the US nuclear test site in the Utah desert. Armendáriz had accepted the role in From Russia with Love (1963) partially as a means of providing financial security for his widow, and the film's schedule was altered in order to film the scenes in which he appeared while he was still physically able. Towards the end of the filming of those scenes, such as the Gypsy camp battle sequence however, director Terence Young had to double for the actor in some of his long shots. One month after all his scenes were completed, Armendáriz, in emulation of his friend Ernest Hemingway, committed suicide in a hospital in Los Angeles as his cancer progressed into the advanced stages.
When then President John F. Kennedy listed Ian Fleming's book among his top ten favorite novels of all time, a list published in Life Magazine, March 17, 1961, the producers decided to make this the second James Bond movie. According to the book "Death of a President" (1964) by William Raymond Manchester, this was the last motion picture JFK ever saw, on a private screening in the White House, November 20, 1963.
During the helicopter sequence towards the end of the film, the inexperienced pilot flew too close to Sean Connery, almost killing him.
From Russia with Love (1963) marks the last appearance of the Sylvia Trench (Eunice Gayson) character, who also appeared in Dr. No (1962). The original plan was for Sylvia to appear in each film as Bond's regular girlfriend, continually frustrated when Bond is called away for his next assignment. This idea was, obviously, scrapped.
Hoping for an end to the Cold War, producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman didn't want James Bond's main enemy to be Russian, so for the film version his nemesis is the fictitious criminal organization SPECTRE, seeking revenge for the death of their operative, Dr. No (1962).
Final James Bond movie viewed by Ian Fleming.
The love scene between Sean Connery and Daniela Bianchi caused censorship problems in Britain. In the scene, a sweating SPECTRE cameraman films James Bond and Tatiana Romanova in bed from a cabinet de voyeur. The British Board of Film Censors mandated to producers Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman that the voyeurism in the scene was too explicit and to keep the footage of the cameraman as minimal as possible or face risking having the whole sequence censored.
The helicopter (carrying director Terence Young during filming) crashed over water, trapping the director below the surface for a considerable time in an air bubble inside the copter's canopy. He was rescued and then immediately went back behind the camera with his arm in a sling.
Over 3,500 onlookers flocked to the Sirkeci Railway Station in Istanbul to watch the filming. Overcrowding caused delays in shooting due to such an unexpected turnout. As such, director Terence Young had stuntman Peter Perkins go and create a distraction by hanging upside down from a balcony nearby so filming could proceed.
As a guest on the The Tonight Show (1962) Robert Shaw explained that he was required to stand on a wooden crate opposite Sean Connery due to being considerably shorter than Connery (some 6 plus inches).
The rats in the film were originally coated with chocolate as they were lab rats and needed to look like sewer rats. However, they wouldn't run and sat around licking themselves. Then, real rats were used but they wouldn't run in the right direction until Sean Connery opened the door of the studio. Finally, the production went to Madrid, Spain to shoot the rat sequence.
The collapsing rifle given to Bond isn't a gimmick, but was an Armalite AR-7 survival rifle which was a production item which actually does disassemble and fit into its stock. However it fires the .22 long rifle cartridge, not .25 caliber as was stated in the film. As of 2015, it is still in production by the Henry Repeating Firearms company. It is one of very few firearms that will float when dropped into water.
Years earlier, Alfred Hitchcock was originally considered as director, with James Bond being played by Cary Grant and Grace Kelly lured out of retirement to play Tatiana Romanova. These ideas were scrapped after Vertigo (1958) failed at the box office. The helicopter chase scene is a homage to Hitchcock's cropduster sequence in North by Northwest (1959).
The picture on the wall of the lobby of the Russian embassy is that of Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin.
Sean Connery was outfitted for the film with eight specially tailored Saville Row suits, each one costing in the region of $2000.
A spin-off video-game was released a staggering forty-two years after the film was made. James Bond 007: From Russia with Love (2005) actually includes Sean Connery's likeness and he even provided the voice. It is Connery's last performance as James Bond to date and he voiced it twenty-two years after Never Say Never Again (1983).
The scene in which James Bond and Tatiana Romanova first meet in the hotel suite has since been used as an audition scene for potential Bond actors and Bond girls. This can be seen in the "making of" documentaries for other Bond films including Octopussy (1983).
The building where James Bond meets Tatiana is called the Hagia Sophia. It was originally a church that was converted to a Mosque in 1453. It is currently used as a museum. It is frequently featured in art history texts as an example of domed Basilica.
Although he had his reservations about the choice of Sean Connery for the part of James Bond, after seeing him in this film writer Ian Fleming was completely won over by the actor.
The headquarters of criminal spy organization SPECTRE in this film is actually the main office administration building of Pinewood Studios.
First Bond film to end with the declaration "James Bond will return in ...", in this case it was Goldfinger (1964). A tradition that would continue until it was used for the last time at the end of Octopussy (1983).
Albert R. Broccoli once named this film along with The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Goldfinger (1964) as his three favorite James Bond movies, according to an interview with the Hollywood Reporter's Robert Osborne.
Vladek Sheybal (Kronsteen the chess master) was a well-studied Polish actor hesitant to accept a role in a Bond film because he thought it might not be a good career move, but his friend Sean Connery persuaded him to sign on and it has helped his career enormously.
In this film, James Bond does not say "Bond, James Bond" despite the fact that he does say it in the book this film was based on.
A scene was cut just before Bond meets Romanova on the ferry. Bond tries to lose his mysterious pursuer and hops into a taxi. Bond takes control of the taxi's brakes, causing the following Bulgarian to run into the back of the taxi as a third car joins the pile-up. The driver of the third car turns out to be Kerim Bey. When the angry Bulgarian protests to Bey, he is told "My friend, this is life", while Bond makes good his escape in the British Embassy's Rolls Royce. Terence Young shot the scene ten times to get the long ash on Bey's cigar that Pedro Armendáriz insisted on. It wasn't until a private screening week before the film's release that Young's twelve year old son spotted that the Bulgarian had in fact already been killed by Grant in the mosque, so it was cut.
Lois Maxwell (Miss Moneypenny) named this as her favorite 007 film.
The moves in the chess game played by Kronsteen (Vladek Sheybal) are from the game played by Boris Spassky and David Bronstein at the USSR Championship in Leningrad in 1960.
The gadget Bond uses to check his hotel telephone for bugs is actually a device called an Elcometer. It is used to check the thickness (in thousandths of an inch) of surface coatings, usually paint, on ferrous surfaces. The needle moves sharply across the scale because, though the bodies of that type of telephone were plastic, their bases were painted steel.
Walter Gotell, who plays Morzeny, later played General Gogol in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and reprised the role of Gogol in 5 Bond films after that.
The budget was $2,000,000 (double that of Dr. No (1962)).
Much of the film was shot on location, with only a bare minimum of back projection used. Something quite unusual for a film of 1963.
From Russia with Love (1963) broke box-office records, launching Sean Connery as a major star, rather than Dr. No (1962).
While the film was in pre-production, the historic route of the Orient Express was changed. Since the 19th Century, the westward-bound Orient Express stopped in Bucharest, Budapest, Vienna, Munich and Strasbourg before arriving in Paris. But, beginning in 1962, the train followed a more southerly route, stopping in Sofia, Belgrade, Venice, Milan and Lausanne. Changes in the script were made to accommodate the re-routing.
"Q"/ Major Boothroyd played by Desmond Llewelyn appears for the first time. This character was played by Peter Burton in Dr. No (1962). When Burton was unable to return for this film, the role was recast with Llewelyn in the part. Llewelyn would reprise the role of "Q" in 16 subsequent Bond films (17 performances in all, but he didn't appear in Live and Let Die (1973). Q is referred to by his real name, "Major Boothroyd," only in Dr. No (1962), this movie, and The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).
In 1950, a US naval attaché was assassinated and thrown from the Orient Express train by a Communist agent. This story inspired Ian Fleming's novel "From Russia With Love". Fleming's own experience at an Interpol Conference in Istanbul, Turkey provided the setting. The film To Paris with Love (1955) provided the tile.
Bond's trick attaché case is the first true Bond film gadget. Other "state of the art" gadgets of the time are the mobile car phone in Bond's Bentley, the miniature tape recorder in the camera, the AR7 survival rifle, the retractable garrote in Grant's watch, and the SPECTRE spring loaded shoe knives.
Although it was not released until quite late in 1963, the film was the biggest box-office success of the year in Britain - no small achievement in the year of such hit films as Tom Jones (1963), The Great Escape (1963) and The Birds (1963), all of which were released in the summer. Not only that, but in the 82 days between its premiere in London and the end of 1963, it had become the most lucrative film of any kind ever to be released in British cinemas. One industry analyst described the phenomenon of its popularity as "akin to Beatlemania" - a remark which must have made United Artists very happy as they were about to make the first The Beatles movie, A Hard Day's Night (1964).
The hulking blond assassin Red Grant provided a template for a number of blond European henchmen that would proliferate the James Bond series in later movies such as Hans in You Only Live Twice (1967); Erich Kriegler in For Your Eyes Only (1981); Venz in A View to a Kill (1985); Necros in The Living Daylights (1987); Peter Franks in Diamonds Are Forever (1971) and Stamper in Tomorrow Never Dies (1997).
The Royal World Premiere of From Russia with Love (1963) was held on 10 October 1963 and attended by John Russell and The Duchess of Bedford. It was held at multiple venues in London which included the London Pavilion with the Odeon Theatre, Leicester Square being the main venue for the occasion. This was the final James Bond premiere attended by James Bond creator Ian Fleming before his death.
The knife shoe used by Rosa Kleb is an actual weapon used by the KGB.
6 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The final filmed appearance of Pedro Armendáriz.
Colonel Rosa Klebb is based on an actual Russian colonel that Ian Fleming once wrote about in the Sunday Times. Katina Paxinou was the producers' first choice for the role.
In the books, Bond often drives his beloved Bentley. The car appears in this film for the only time in the regular series.
On the Istanbul ferry journey, the Maiden's tower can be seen in the distance behind Bond. This was Renard's lair in The World Is Not Enough (1999).
The boat chase at the end of the movie, although supposed to be taking place in the Greek archipelago, was actually filmed in the West of Scotland. The pier James Bond takes off from is at Lunga House and the scene where the flaming barrels are thrown off the boat in Loch Craignish Ardfern, Argyll.
In the book of the same name Rosa Klebb (Lotte Lenya) is described as sadist who is an expert at inducing extreme pain and enjoys the act of torturing.
Sean Connery and Robert Shaw would later play adversaries again in Robin and Marian (1976).
Actresses considered for the role of Tatiana Romanova included Pia Lindström, Sally Douglas, Magda Konopka, Margaret Lee, Lucia Modugno, Sylva Koscina, Virna Lisi and Tania Mallet, the latter ended up getting the role of Tilly Masterson in Goldfinger (1964). Reportedly, the producers first choice had originally been Elga Andersen but she was allegedly deemed too difficult by the studio United Artists. As such, 1960 Italy's Miss Universe Daniela Bianchi got the part. Her voice was dubbed in the film by an uncredited Barbara Jefford in order to hide her thick Italian accent.
The film's storyline deals with the Lektor Decoding Machine, the name of which was called the Spektor Decoding Machine in the original Ian Fleming novel. Its name was changed because of its similarity with the name of the fictitious criminal spy organization "Spectre". He based this device on his knowledge of the Enigma Decoding Machine from World War II. Fleming was involved with the Ultra Network who cracked the Enigma Code in 1939. The Ultra Network's activities were not released until 1975 in a book called A Man Called Intrepid (1979). Fleming's friend Sir William Stevenson wrote the book which was published at the time when the closed period on wartime secrets expired and the records were finally declassified.
James Bond doesn't appear until 17 minutes and 15 seconds into the movie. Red Grant's voice is first heard 1h 20m in.
Signs on a door in the Russian embassy in Russian mean rather Twitch/Shove than Pull/Push (and Bond actually pushes when the sign says to twitch). Both Russian words are quite hilarious for a Russian speaker.
Both Sean Connery and Pedro Armendáriz wear hairpieces throughout the film.
The chess tournament set appearing at the beginning of the film cost $150,000. The ceiling top of the chess set was actually a matte painting.
9 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Product placements, brand integrations and promotional tie-ins for this movie include Rolex Watches, James Bond wears a Rolex Submariner; Taittinger Blanc de Blanc Champagne; a billboard advertising another movie made by the Bond producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli called Call Me Bwana (1963) starring Anita Ekberg and Bob Hope; and Bentley motor vehicles, James Bond drives a Derby Bentley Mark 4 ½ Liter Sports Tourer convertible, the only time he drives a Bentley in the Eon Productions series.
9 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
One of three James Bond movies where Bond does not wear a Tuxedo (the other two being You Only Live Twice (1967) and Live and Let Die (1973)).
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Daniela Bianchi's driver fell asleep during the commute to a 6 am shoot and crashed the car; the actress' face was bruised, and Bianchi's scenes had to be delayed two weeks while these facial contusions healed
5 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The production was beset with production problems which posed serious problems for the assemblage of the film. Many filmed scenes didn't match with a re-written script and the film was over-scheduled and had gone over-budget. Editor Peter R. Hunt used innovative editing techniques and tricks which saved the picture.
9 of 13 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Regular James Bond production designer Ken Adam could not work on the film as he was unavailable due to going to work on Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964).
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Location manager William Hill was forced to play the role of the real Captain Nash when the actor hired for the role couldn't make it at the last minute.
6 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This is the first James Bond film to feature John Barry as the primary soundtrack composer. The score allegedly still contains riffs from Monty Norman's work on Dr. No (1962). Barry himself felt that Goldfinger (1964) was the first film in the series where he had complete creative control over the soundtrack.
8 of 12 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
By the time the film opened in the US in April 1964, production was already underway on Goldfinger (1964).
9 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The helmsman of the lead SPECTRE powerboat pursuing Bond is Peter Twiss OBE DSC who, in 1956, flew the Fairey Delta 2 aircraft to a new world air speed record of 1,132 mph. At the time of the shooting of the film he was working for Fairey Marine at Hamble, Hampshire, the manufacturer of the powerboats used. Mr. Twiss details his role in the film in his autobiography "Faster then the Sun". He describes a misunderstanding between Sean Connery and Terence Young regarding timing during the fuel explosion sequence which resulted in a re-shoot after 2 days delay.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Terence Young disliked Daniela Bianchi's legs and used a stand-in for the scene where Bond spies on the Russian embassy in Istanbul using a periscope.
2 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The periscope in the scene in which Bond and Kerim Bey spy on the Russian Embassy from the Basilica Cistern was actually a dummy wooden periscope double made by UK manufacturing company Barr and Stroud.
6 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Three Beauty Pageant Queens are actresses in this film: Daniela Bianchi, Martine Beswick, Aliza Gur. Bianchi (Italy) and Gur (Israel) were roommates at Miss Universe 1960, which Bianchi won.
5 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The garden setting in the opening sequence was inspired by Last Year at Marienbad (1961) which had a lush garden setting with statues. It was actually the garden at Pinewood Studios and director Terence Young had the garden recreated in principal from the art house classic.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The literary character of Darko Kerim was only referred as Kerim Bey or Ali Kerim Bey. "Bey" is the Turkish equivalent of the English word "Mister".
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Johanna Harwood stated in an interview in a Cinema Retro that she had been a screenwriter of several of Harry Saltzman's projects, and her screenplay had followed Fleming's novel closely, but she left the series due to what she called Terence Young's constant rewriting of her screenplay with ideas that were not in the original novel.
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Richard Maibaum kept on making rewrites as filming progressed. Red Grant was added to the Istanbul scenes just prior to the film crew's trip to Turkey - a change that brought more focus to the SPECTRE plot, as Grant started saving Bond's life there (a late change during shooting involved Grant killing the bespectacled spy at Hagia Sophia instead of Bond, who ends up just finding the man dead).
3 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Krilencu is supposed to be Bulgarian, but uses the Romanian or Moldovan spelling--the Bulgarian would be Krylenko. His hideout is behind a billboard advertising Call Me Bwana (1963), also produced by Albert R. Broccoli and Harry Saltzman.
4 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to the film's CD Soundtrack sleeve notes, this film's theme song debuted in the UK Charts on 14 November 1963 and went to No. #20. In the USA, the film's soundtrack album charted on the 2nd of May 1964 and went to No. #27. A number of tracks on the album do not appear in the film whilst the main titles track on the album is different to that in the film. The soundtrack has never had an extended release with the release of extra tracks like other Bond soundtracks apparently due to the masters being lost.
6 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Two actresses with bit parts would reappear in later films: Nadja Regin, who plays Kerim's girl, would play the dancer at the start of Goldfinger (1964), and Martine Beswick (called Martin Beswick in the credits), one of the Gypsy girls, returned as Paula in Thunderball (1965).
5 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The SPECTRE training school was inspired by the gladiator school from Spartacus (1960).
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Future James Bonds Timothy Dalton and Daniel Craig named this as their favourite Bond film.
3 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The literal translations of some of this film's foreign language titles include Love and Kisses From Russia (Belgium); Moscow Versus 007 (Portugal); The Return Of Agent 007 (Latin America); Love Greetings From Moscow (Germany); 007 In Istanbul (Finland); Hearty Kisses From Russia (France); Agent 007 Sees Red (Sweden) ; 007: From Russia With Love (Spain); Moscow Against 007 (Brazil); 007 Averted The Spy Plot (China); To 007, From Russia With Love (Italy); Agent 007 Is Hunted (Denmark) and From Moscow With Love (Poland)
6 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The helicopter and boat scenes were meant to be shot in Istanbul, but were moved to Scotland; the speed-boats could not run fast enough due to the many waves in the sea, and a rented boat filled with cameras ended up sinking in the Bosphorus. A helicopter was also hard to obtain - the special effects crew were nearly arrested trying to get one at a local air base.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The sounds of the boat chase were replaced in post-production since the boats were not loud enough, and the explosion, shot in Pinewood, got out of control, burning Walter Gotell's eyelids and seriously injuring three stuntmen.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
For the opening credits, Maurice Binder had disagreements with the producers and did not want to return. Designer Robert Brownjohn stepped into his place, and projected the credits on female dancers, inspired by constructivist artist László Moholy-Nagy projecting light onto clouds in the 1920s.
2 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Steven Spielberg, a noted 007 fan, was convinced to cast Robert Shaw as Quint in Jaws after watching his role in this film.
1 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The James Bond ally character of Ali Kerim Bey was known as "Darko" Kerim Bey in the original Ian Fleming novel of the same name.
4 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Vehicles featured included The Orient Express Train; SPECTRE's two-seater Hiller UH-12C helicopter; a yellow C30 1961 Chevrolet flatbed delivery truck; a 1960 Ford Fordor Ranch Wagon; a Venetian water taxi gondola; a Fairey Huntress 23 speed boat being pursued by two Huntsman 28 and two Huntress speedboats. In Istanbul, Bond is pursued by a black Citroën Traction Avant and chauffeured by a black Rolls Royce Silver Wraith Phantom V. Bond owns a Bentley automobile as was the case in the original Ian Fleming novels. Here it is a green-black Bentley 3 1/2 litre Drop Head Coupe with MTS radio car-telephone, a uncommon toy for 1963 and only new to Britain at the time of the film. Bond never has a Bentley car again in a Bond film except for Casino Royale (1967) and Never Say Never Again (1983).
4 of 10 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The name of the director of photography Ted Moore can be seen on the body of Julie Mendez during the opening titles sequence. This was intended as a practical joke by cinematographer Frank Tidy and main titles designer Robert Brownjohn.
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Much to the annoyance of Bond, Grant regularly refers to him as "Old man". Robert Shaw was actually three years older than Sean Connery.
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli, the current producers of the series, named this as their favourite Bond film.
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The film's title song "From Russia With Love" sung by Matt Monro can be heard on the radio when James Bond and Sylvia Trench are sitting in a boat having a picnic. This song was the first ever James Bond title song to receive a Best Song Golden Globe nomination. A number of others would follow for Bond movies. A cover version of this song sung by Natacha Atlas can be heard on the David Arnold Bond song compilation album, "Shaken and Stirred: the David Arnold James Bond Project".
3 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
James Mason was set to star as James Bond in a 1958 TV adaptation of this book that was never made.
3 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The only word spoken by Kronsteen during the chess sequence is "check". Incidentally, the character himself is a Czech.
5 of 17 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the beginning of the film, the floor beneath the chess tournament is laid out in a 10 by 8 pattern with 80 squares instead of the standard 64 making for a wider visual shot.
3 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
In order to qualify for the British film funding of the time, at least 70 percent of the film had to have been filmed in Great Britain or the Commonwealth.
2 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The original screenwriter was Len Deighton, who accompanied Harry Saltzman, Syd Cain, and Terence Young to Istanbul, but he was replaced because of a lack of progress.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Photographer David Hurn was commissioned by the producers of the James Bond films to shoot a series of stills with Sean Connery and the actresses of the film. When the theatrical property Walther PPK pistol did not arrive, Hurn volunteered the use of his own Walther LP-53 air pistol. Though the photographs of the "James Bond is Back" posters of the US release airbrushed out the long barrel of the pistol, film poster artist Renato Fratini used the long-barrelled pistol for his drawings of Connery on the British posters.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Daniela Bianchi would appear in the 007 spoof, Operation Kid Brother (1967).
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to the book 'James Bond: A Celebration' (1987) by Peter Haining, who passed away in 2007, "Jules Verne's Captain Nemo was the inspiration for [Ian] Fleming's Ernst Stavro Blofeld". The book states that the character " . . . has his origins in Captain Nemo, the hate-fuelled rebel of Jules Verne's classic novel Twenty Thousand Leagues Under The Sea [1870]". Blofeld was originally intended to be the villain in The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The final mention of Ernst Stavro Blofeld in a James Bond creator Ian Fleming story, was at the start of Fleming's "The Man with the Golden Gun" (1965) book, his final full Bond novel.
1 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
For the opening chess match, Kronsteen wins the game with a re-enactment of Boris Spassky's victory over David Bronstein in 1960. Production Designer Syd Cain built up the "chess pawn" motif in his $150,000 set for the brief sequence.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The helicopter chase was filmed with a radio controlled miniature helicopter.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Gypsy camp was to be filmed in an actual camp in Topkapi, but was actually shot in a replica of it in Pinewood.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Shaw originally turned down the role of Grant, calling the script 'rubbish'. His then-wife Mary Ure convinced him to take the part.
1 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The surname of the Ernst Stavro Blofeld character was allegedly named after Thomas Blofeld with whom James Bond creator Ian Fleming went to school with at Eton College. Also known as Tom Blofeld, he was a Norfolk farmer, a fellow member of Boodle's, and the Chairman of the Country Gentleman's Asssociation. His son is cricket commentator Henry Blofeld. Ernst Blofeld's date of birth in the literary James Bond stories is the same date as Fleming's birthday which is 28th May 1908. Moreover, Ernest Cuneo was a friend of Fleming's. According to the book "Martinis, Girls and Guns: 50 Years of 007" (2003) by Martin Sterling and Gary Morecambe: "Cuneo may have also have inspired Blofeld's forenames - it is but a short leap from Ernest Cuneo to Ernst Stavro". According to the book "For Your Eyes Only: Ian Fleming + James Bond" (2009) by Ben Macintyre: "Alternatively, Blofeld may owe his name to China scholar John Blofeld, who was a member of Fleming's club Boodles, and whose father was named Ernst". In addition, the book "The Bond Code: The Dark World of Ian Fleming and James Bond" (2008) by Philip Gardner states: "The name is also revealing in a psychological way. Ernst is Teutonic for 'earnest', and Stavros is Greek for 'victor', and so he is the 'earnest victor'", and "the name Blofeld means 'blue field', a swipe at his own blue blood rampant in the field, like heraldry", and moreover, "As the creator of SPECTRE, Blofeld is in reality the spectre of Ian Fleming that looms ever present within his divided mind".
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
According to Robbie Collin in UK newspaper 'The Telegraph', "Bond author Ian Fleming invented SPECTRE in 1959 to replace James Bond's usual, Soviet, enemies. Fleming believed the Cold War might be about to end and wanted to keep his spy thrillers relevant". Fleming's SPECTRE Executive Cabinet included "21 people including former Gestapo members, Soviet spy group SMERSH, Josep Tito [Josip Broz Tito]'s secret police, Italian, Corsican and Turkish organised crime gangs", its goals were "profiteering from conflict between the superpowers, eventual world domination", and its methods included "counter-intelligence, brainwashing, murder, extortion using weapons of mass destruction (nuclear, biological and orbital)".
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Sean Connery later appeared in Murder on the Orient Express (1974) which, like this film, involves a murder on the famous train.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
This film features five actors who also have acted in the Doctor Who franchise.
Is this interesting? Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Terence Young cast Lotte Lenya after hearing one of her musical recordings.
1 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Hélène Chanel, Marisa Mell, Norma Foster, Maria Kazan, Gabriella Licudi, Talitha Pol, Marilù Tolo and Aliza Gur were considered for the role of Tatiana Romanova. Gur was eventually cast in the role of Vida.
1 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dominique Boschero and Sally Douglas were considered for the role of Kerim's Girl.
1 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Bond doesn't say "Bond, James Bond" in this film.
1 of 8 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Between the two scenes, where Grant leaves the Citroën with the Bulgarian driver's corpse outside the Russian Embassy in Istambul, and the bomb attack on Kerim Bey's place, we can see the view of the Sultan Ahmed Mosque (or 'Blue Mosque') for about ten seconds. During which time we hear a sang prayer coming from loudspeakers. Interestingly the melody we hear is shockingly identical with another melody that has otherwise nothing to do with this movie. It's a few bars from 'Jack's Lament' from _The Nightmare before Christmas (1993)_, the part where it goes in 3/4, with the words 'Oh somewhere deep inside of these bones'. Of course Danny Elfman is far too versatile and original a composer, so it would be silly to think that he built his career on four bars he heard in a movie when he was just 10 years old.
0 of 19 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Joe Robinson was a strong contender for the role of Red Grant. He would later play Peter Franks in Diamonds Are Forever (1971).
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The boat chase was inspired by a previous Terence Young/Albert R. Broccoli/Richard Maibaum collaboration, Paratrooper (1953).
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Stunt coordinator Bob Simmons was unavailable and was replaced by Peter Perkins, though Simmons performed stunts in the film.
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Several women were tested for the roles of Vida and Zora, the two fighting Gypsy girls, and after Aliza Gur and Martine Beswick were cast, they spent six weeks practising their fight choreography with stunt work arranger Peter Perkins.
0 of 3 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Robert Shaw dyed his hair blonde for the film.
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Tania is brunette in the book. In the film, she's blonde.
0 of 2 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
At the age of 21, Daniela Bianchi is the youngest actress to play a 'leading' Bond girl in the Bond series.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The pre-Title Sequence was shot in the grounds of Pinewood Studios, in particular the distinct building Heatherden Hall. A popular part of the backlot, Heatherden Hall is a Grade II-listed, Victorian country house and is used as offices, film sets, and as a wedding venue. It, and the grounds, can also be better seen in daylight in the other well-known non-James Bond Ian Fleming book & later MGM film "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang", amongst other films and TV series made at Pinewood Studios.
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Cameo 

Anthony Dawson: In the first appearance of the Ernst Stavro Blofeld villain character in a James Bond movie. His part is uncredited in the credits, which are attributed to a question mark. Dawson had previously appeared in Dr. No (1962) as Professor Dent and again would return as Blofeld in Thunderball (1965). He is the only actor to have ever played Blofeld more than once. The voice of Blofeld in this film was dubbed by an uncredited Eric Pohlmann.
Ian Fleming: (unconfirmed) Some reports maintain that James Bond creator Fleming appears standing next to the Orient Express train. He is wearing grey trousers and a white jumper and stands on the platform to the right side of the train. Some sources deny that this is him.
8 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Nikki Van der Zyl: As the voice (uncredited) of a Receptionist. She dubbed other actresses' voices as Honey Ryder in Dr. No (1962) and Domino Derval in Thunderball (1965).
8 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Bob Simmons: The series regular stuntman is the actor appearing in the gun barrel sequence at the beginning of the film. The same footage was used for the first three James Bond movies, the others being Dr. No (1962) and Goldfinger (1964).
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Eric Pohlmann: As the voice (uncredited) of Ernst Stravro Blofeld.
5 of 7 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Jacqueline Saltzman: Wife of producer Harry Saltzman is leaning out the window of the Orient Express, next to the window containing Robert Shaw, as it leaves the station. The film was actually shot on the real Orient Express.
6 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Dorothea Bennett: The wife of director Terence Young as a Woman on Bridge in Venice who films James Bond and Tatiana Romanova.
2 of 5 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Terence Young: The director appears (uncredited) as an extra and as a body double (uncredited) for Pedro Armendáriz.
2 of 6 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

The brutal fight in the train compartment between James Bond and Red Grant lasts only a few minutes on screen but took three weeks to film. Most of it was performed by the actors themselves, rather than doubles.
Red Grant has no dialog until he first meets Bond, first speaking in a rich, upper class English accent. After he's revealed his true identity to Bond, Grant's English accent changes into a lower-class Irish accent as he is explaining the SPECTRE background plot.
The opening scene where "James Bond" is stalked and killed by Red Grant was originally written to appear later in the film. However, editor Peter R. Hunt figured it would work better as a teaser at the start of the movie, thus instigating the now-traditional pre-credits sequence. The man who originally played James Bond's double looked so much like Sean Connery that director Terence Young had to re-shoot the scene with a man with a mustache.
Though he isn't shown actually taking it, it is implied that Bond keeps Grant's garrote watch, as the watch appears in On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) when Bond cleans out his desk, as well as in a deleted scene in A View to a Kill (1985) when the Paris police return Bond's property.
The actor playing the Bond double did not actually have a mustache. On set, the filmmakers became concerned that audience members not yet familiar with Sean Connery would be confused when Grant pulls off the Bond/Connery mask. The mustache was added to make it clear that the dead "Bond" was someone else.
The first line of the Ian Fleming James Bond novel "From Russia with Love" reads: "The naked man who lay splayed out on his face beside the swimming pool might have been dead." The last line of the novel reads: "He said, or thought he said, 'I've already got the loveliest...'. Bond pivoted slowly on his heel and crashed headlong to the wine-red floor." Bond dies a happy, protracted death after being lightly wounded by Rosa Klebb's shoe with a poisoned knife. Ian Fleming was frustrated with the lack of success the novels had had. But when this turned out to be a bestseller, Fleming continued the series instead, and later said From Russia With Love was the best of all the Bond novels.
9 of 14 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
On-screen body count: 21. This does not include the real Captain Nash, who is presumably killed by Grant off-camera, and Morzeny, who is seen burning following the explosion of the fuel tanks in the Adriatic, but not clearly seen to be dead.
6 of 9 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Kronsteen's death, the boat chase, the opening sequence with the fake Bond being killed by Red Grant, and all scenes with Blofeld were not in the original novel. These were inventions of the film version, most of which due in part to the fact that the main enemy agency was changed to the fictitious SPECTRE (SPecial Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion) rather than SMERSH (Shmert Spionam=Death to Spies), which at one time was a real Soviet counterintelligence agency.
6 of 11 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The Ernst Stavro Blofeld villain character returns to the official film franchise in Spectre (2015) but since Blofeld last appeared in the official series films Diamonds Are Forever (1971) and informally in For Your Eyes Only (1981) and the unofficial entry Never Say Never Again (1983), Blofeld has actually appeared in three James Bond video-games. The Wikipedia website states: "Blofeld appears in the 2004 video game GoldenEye: Rogue Agent [GoldenEye: Rogue Agent (2004)], this time with the likeness of Donald Pleasence [from You Only Live Twice (1967)], voiced by Gideon Emery. Blofeld is a playable multiplayer character in the 2010 video game GoldenEye 007 [GoldenEye 007 (2010)] for the Wii, with the likeness of Charles Gray [from Diamonds Are Forever (1971)]. Blofeld is one of the main characters in the 2012 video game 007 Legends [007 Legends (2012)], featured in the mission based on On Her Majesty's Secret Service [See On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969)], in which the character was an amalgamation of the three actors [who had] appeared in the official film series [they being Telly Savalas, Charles Gray, & Donald Pleasence]. Throughout the game, he is voiced by Glenn Wrage."
2 of 4 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
Spectre (2015) is the second of two major appearances of the Ernst Stavro Blofeld character in the official James Bond film franchise where Blofeld is seen with hair, as he had been in Diamonds Are Forever (1971) where he was played by Charles Gray. In both You Only Live Twice (1967) and On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), Blofeld was bald, being portrayed by Donald Pleasence and Telly Savalas respectively. In minor roles and appearances, Blofeld was bald in the unofficial appearance in For Your Eyes Only (1981), but had hair in Thunderball (1965) , From Russia with Love (1963), and the unofficial film, Never Say Never Again (1983).
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink
The character of Ernst Stavro Blofeld has appeared in the following major and/or official James Bond movies and video-games (in order): From Russia with Love (1963), Thunderball (1965), You Only Live Twice (1967), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), Diamonds Are Forever (1971), informally in the official film For Your Eyes Only (1981), in the unofficial film Never Say Never Again (1983), GoldenEye 007 (2010), GoldenEye: Rogue Agent (2004), 007 Legends (2012), and Spectre (2015) .
0 of 1 found this interesting Interesting? | Share this
Share this: Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Permalink

See also

Goofs | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

Contribute to This Page