Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2002

1-20 of 27 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


'War Machine' Review: Brad Pitt Goes Runaway-General Gonzo in Over-the-Top Satire

20 hours ago | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

"Why is a general talking to Rolling Stone in the first place?" That the question asked near the end of War Machine, a film loosely based on "The Runaway General," a National Magazine Award finalist for excellence in reporting by Michael Hastings. (The same article, it should be mentioned, that helped lose Gen. Stanley McChrystal his job as commander of all U.S. and Nato forces in Afghanistan.)

Hastings, who died in a car crash four years ago at 33, expanded his 2010 profile of McChrystal into a 2012 book-length expose called The Operators. »

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'War Machine': Film Review

22 May 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

The latest addition to the gallery of darkly comic films designed to make the case for the absurdity of war, War Machine has trouble maintaining a steady tone, but its climactic, sobering assault ultimately hits the target. In his desire to simultaneously portray and mock the authority figures in charge of the American war effort in Afghanistan (now the longest armed conflict in American history), writer-director David Michod is clearly trying to channel the Stanley Kubrick of Dr. Strangelove, as well as other satiric works like M*A*S*H, Catch-22, Slaughterhouse-Five, Three Kings and Wag the Dog. Despite its troublesomely »

- Todd McCarthy

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‘War Machine’ Review: Brad Pitt Stars In a Shrewd Blend of Wartime Drama and Workplace Satire

21 May 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

A movie called “War Machine” may not sound like a workplace satire, but that’s the savviest element in David Michod’s tone-shifting character study, in which Brad Pitt plays a naive army strategist lost in the fog of a conflict with no end in sight. As U.S. General Glen McMahon, Brad Pitt plays an overconfident military man tasked with winding down the war in Afghanistan, only to get trapped by hubris and vanity that have nothing to do with the mission. His greatest enemy is the job itself.

This might sound familiar. Set in 2012 in the midst of an election campaign, “War Machine” draws from Michael Hastings’ nonfiction “The Operators: The Wild and Terrifying Story of America’s War in Afghanistan,” which recounts the pileup of dysfunctions surrounding his travels with General Stanley McChrystal, whose vocal opposition to the Obama Administration’s desire to wind down the »

- Eric Kohn

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Kiss Me Deadly Restoration 20th Anniversary — Savant Article

13 May 2017 3:59 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

How did Kiss Me Deadly come to be restored? The real question should be, how did filmdom lose track of its original ending in the first place? Savant uncovers evidence that may explain when, and why, United Artists mutilated the finish of Robert Aldrich’s apocalyptic film noir.

(Note: The images below with text can be enlarged for reading, just click on them.)

Before home video the final home for Hollywood films was Television. Robert Aldrich’s 1955 Kiss Me Deadly never saw a theatrical reissue, and it dropped out of major TV visibility in 1962. I saw the documentation in United Artists’ legal folder on the film. To secure capital to launch more movies, Robert Aldrich sold all of his ‘Associates and Aldrich’ pictures back to UA after their original releases were concluded. More papers showed Kiss Me Deadly being included in at least two TV syndication packages, and then each time pointedly removed. »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Best Opening Credit Sequences In Movie History — IndieWire Critics Survey

8 May 2017 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film and TV critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

This week’s question: Inspired by Baby Groot’s “Mr. Blue Sky” dance sequence at the beginning of “Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2,” what movie has the best opening credits sequence?

April Wolfe (@awolfeful), La Weekly

Hands down, it’s R.W. Fassbinder’s “The Marriage of Maria Braun.” I watch the opening sequence at least three times a year and show it to every filmmaker I can. I love any film that begins with a bang, and this one does quite literally: We open up on an explosion that rips out a hunk of brick wall, exposing a German couple in the middle of a rushed marriage ceremony. »

- David Ehrlich

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Seven Days in May

5 May 2017 1:02 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

 

A military coup in the U.S.? General Burt Lancaster’s scheme would be flawless if not for true blue Marine Kirk Douglas, who snitches to the White House. Now Burt’s whole expensive clandestine army might go to waste – Sad! John Frankenheimer and Rod Serling are behind this nifty paranoid conspiracy thriller.

Seven Days in May

Blu-ray

Warner Archive Collection

1964 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 118 min. / Street Date May 8, 2017 / available through the WBshop / 21.99

Starring: Burt Lancaster, Kirk Douglas, Fredric March, Ava Gardner, Edmond O’Brien, Martin Balsam, Andrew Duggan, John Houseman, Hugh Marlowe, Whit Bissell, George Macready, Richard Anderson, Malcolm Atterbury, William Challee, Colette Jackson, John Larkin, Kent McCord, Tyler McVey, Jack Mullaney, Fredd Wayne, Ferris Webster.

Cinematography: Ellsworth Fredericks

Film Editor: Ferris Webster

Original Music: Jerry Goldsmith

Written by Rod Serling from the book by Fletcher Knebel, Charles W. Bailey II

Produced by Edward Lewis

Directed by John Frankenheimer »

- Glenn Erickson

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Newswire: Oliver Stone made Vladimir Putin watch Dr. Strangelove, apparently

2 May 2017 9:00 PM, PDT | avclub.com | See recent The AV Club news »

Stanley Kubrick’s Cold War satire Dr. Strangelove has lost some of its fun in recent months, when things like “war with Russia” and “the complete nuclear annihilation of the Earth” stopped seeming like cautionary tales of a bygone era, and started seeming like potential headlines on tomorrow’s newspapers. Still, that sudden increase in relevance has had at least one weird real-world payoff: The revelation that director Oliver Stone just screened the film for Russian president Vladimir Putin, who’d never seen it before.

Per The Washington Post, Stone was in the process of filming The Putin Interviews, a four-part series for Showtime, when he showed Putin the film. Sadly, The Post doesn’t have Putin’s reaction to the movie, in which bumbling, gamesmanship, and an obsession with mutually assured destruction on the parts of the U.S. and Russia consign the planet to an unavoidable doomsday scenario »

- William Hughes

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Oliver Stone Interviews Vladimir Putin, Uncensored, in Showtime’s New Documentary Series ‘The Putin Interviews’

1 May 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Oliver Stone has interviewed Russian president Vladimir Putin more than a dozen times over the past two years. Now, Stone and his documentary producer Fernando Sulichin have turned those chats into “The Putin Interviews,” a four-hour documentary series airing over four nights this June on Showtime.

Check out a first look at “The Putin Interviews” below. Stone most recently interviewed Putin in February, after the U.S. presidential elections (in which Putin and Russia are believed to have actively influenced). Showtime compares “The Putin Interviews” to David Frost’s famed conversations with Richard Nixon in 1977.

Stone and Sulichin were granted wide access to Putin’s personal and professional lives. “It’s not a documentary as much as a question and answer session,” Stone told the Sydney Morning Herald. “”It opens up a whole viewpoint that we as Americans haven’t heard… He talks pretty straight. I think we did him »

- Michael Schneider

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Oliver Stone Interviews Vladimir Putin, Uncensored, in Showtime’s New Documentary Series ‘The Putin Interviews’

1 May 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Oliver Stone has interviewed Russian president Vladimir Putin more than a dozen times over the past two years. Now, Stone and his documentary producer Fernando Sulichin have turned those chats into “The Putin Interviews,” a four-hour documentary series airing over four nights this June on Showtime.

Check out a first look at “The Putin Interviews” below. Stone most recently interviewed Putin in February, after the U.S. presidential elections (in which Putin and Russia are believed to have actively influenced). Showtime compares “The Putin Interviews” to David Frost’s famed conversations with Richard Nixon in 1977.

Stone and Sulichin were granted wide access to Putin’s personal and professional lives. “It’s not a documentary as much as a question and answer session,” Stone told the Sydney Morning Herald. “”It opens up a whole viewpoint that we as Americans haven’t heard… He talks pretty straight. I think we did him »

- Michael Schneider

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Oliver Stone’s Vladimir Putin Interviews to Air on Showtime as Four-Hour Documentary

1 May 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Snagging an interview with Russian President Vladimir Putin has stood as a Holy Grail for several news organizations. ABC NewsGeorge Stephanopoulos has been pursuing just such a “get,” and the idea has surfaced elsewhere as well. Premium cable network Showtime appears to have gotten the scoop.

The CBS Corp.-owned pay-cable network will over four consecutive nights in June air “The Putin Interviews,” a series of conversations between filmmaker Oliver Stone and the Russian chief of state. The documentary program will debut on Monday, June 12, at 9 p.m. eastern, with three more segments slated to appear over the next three nights.

“If Vladimir Putin is indeed the great enemy of the United States, then at least we should try to understand him,” Stone said in a prepared statement.

Stone and his longtime documentary producer Fernando Sulichin, interviewed the Russian leader more than a dozen times over the course of two years, Showtime »

- Brian Steinberg

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Forbidden Tomes: Laugh, the End is Nigh – Horrific Humor in the Works of Kafka and Kubrick

28 April 2017 3:17 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

A woman runs down a long, deserted hallway trying to save her son from her maniacal husband, when she is stopped by a ghastly phantom who proclaims, “Great party, isn’t it?” A man wakes in bed to discover that he has transformed into a giant insect, and worries that he might miss his morning train. Another is charged of a crime with no name, and hopes that his co-workers won’t hear about it. A cigar-chewing general sends a misinformed order, which leads a patriotic cowboy to start the nuclear apocalypse. These scenarios are infamous examples of the absurd, the comedic and the horrific, expressed in chaotic unison through fiction. All of them were created by artists who are often taken far too seriously: Franz Kafka and Stanley Kubrick.

Most Americans have read Kafka in a high school or college lit class, the most oft-taught examples being his novella »

- Ben Larned

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'The Circle' Review: Torn-From-Headlines Tech Thriller Is Cinematic Dead Link

28 April 2017 7:59 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

What we have here is one of those up-to-the-minute attacks on Internet atrocities that stopped being up-to-the-minute the second co-writer Dave Eggers, on whose 2013 novel The Circle is based, finished the script and hit "send." Fact trumps (I use the verb advisedly) fiction everywhere these days, especially with Congress giving Web providers a free hand to sell every little thing they know about us. What this movie needed was the satiric depth-charge of a Stanley Kubrick in his Dr. Strangelove period, a sort of How I Learned to Stop Worrying »

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A Sight for Sounds: Moments in Movies Instantly Elevated by the Use of Music

28 April 2017 4:30 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

Author: Andy Furlong

When Guardians of the Galaxy was first released in 2014 for all its quirk and swagger the thing that really separated it from the rest of the Marvel pack was its use of music. Director James Gunn revealed that the film’s composer, Tyler Bates, had written large chunks of the score first so that they could film to the actual music. In many ways the film’s personality is its score, and with the release of the sequel Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 in cinemas this week audiences can expect more of the same.

Music is probably the most important thing in cinema for instantly establishing mood, tone and visual cues. From the menacing piano keys of John Williams’ memorable score in Jaws to the sheer elation of Alan Silvestri’s triumphant overture in Back to the Future, a film’s accompanying score is often as unforgettable as the movie itself. »

- Andy Furlong

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Jonathan Demme and Performance: 10 Videos That Capture His Musical Genius

26 April 2017 1:12 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Jonathan Demme’s love of rock ‘n roll and an uncanny ability to capture the spirit of individual artists has been evident throughout his career. He revolutionized the concert film, used soundtracks to drive his films, and turned non-musical stars into performers.

Here’s ten videos that capture just one side of this amazing artist’s brilliance.

Read More: Jonathan Demme, Oscar-Winning Director of ‘Silence of the Lambs,’ Dies At 73

“Pyscho Killer,” Talking Heads

Arguably, the greatest and most important concert film of all-time, “Stop Making Sense” not only showcases the uniqueness of the Talking Heads, but their theatricality, invention and sense of cinema – referencing a number of classic films. The introduction to the movie is a pure Demme and David Byrne creation, with a gentle nod to “Dr. Strangelove.”

The Big Suit in “Girlfriend is Better,” Talking Heads

David Byrne emerging in the big suit in “Stop Making Sense »

- Chris O'Falt

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How Michelangelo Antonioni Mastered the Art of Visual Geometry — Watch

16 April 2017 9:38 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

“Visual geometry” might not be the first phrase that comes to mind when thinking of Michelangelo Antonioni, but a new video essay published by Fandor makes a strong argument for it being among the Italian master’s essential tools. (Well, that and Monica Vitti, of course.)

Read More: Why ‘Mulholland Drive’ Is the Most Essential Film David Lynch Will Ever Make — Watch

The minute-long video offers a brief rundown of Antonioni’s recurring visual motifs, from showing characters looking through windows (“L’Avventura,” “The Passenger”) and walking through doorways (“The Mystery of Oberwald,” “Identification of a Woman”) to being shown through fences (“Red Desert,” “Zabriskie Point”) and traversing vast landscapes (“La Notte,” “Blowup”). It also takes note of his geometric compositions, namely his frequent use of straight, vertical and converging lines.

Read More: ‘American Gods’ Review: Bryan Fuller Paints a Beautiful, Bloody, and Unblinking Portrait of American Duality

“Creating depth, »

- Michael Nordine

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The Early History of One Actor Playing A Shit Ton of Roles In A Single Film

13 April 2017 11:51 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

Containing multitudes is a time-honored cinematic tradition.

Sure, featuring a single actor as more than one character in your movie smells a bit like a gimmick—but at the end of the day, it’s an efficient and often effective means of showcasing the versatility of a performer. And that can hardly be faulted. We caught a whiff of it with Split this year, though McAvoy might be disqualified for being a Legion of One rather than a cast with a shared face. Personally, I had no idea the trend cast such a wide-reaching historical net — I’d stupidly assumed it was something made possible by the advent of modern makeup and digital tech. Again, stupidly.

Be it gimmick or something more nuanced (or both!) — it’s particularly fascinating that it has such a long standing history as a marketing device. Film quality aside, the main draw is often the performative tour-de-force itself. Some »

- Meg Shields

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Looking Back a the Genius of Stanley Kubrick

7 March 2017 4:00 PM, PST | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

Today marks the 18th anniversary of the death of Stanley Kubrick.   Kubrick died at the age of 70 in 1999 after having directed less than 20 films in his entire career.  But that was more than enough for him to make his mark on Hollywood and go down as one of the greatest directors of all-time.   It’s nearly impossible to choose a favorite work of his considering his library includes classics like Spartacus, Lolita, The Shining, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Dr. Strangelove, A Clockwork Orange, and Full Metal Jacket.   While those aren’t his only films, they are probably the most

Looking Back a the Genius of Stanley Kubrick »

- Nat Berman

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Oscars In Memoriam: Carrie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Gene Wilder, Others Honored

26 February 2017 8:37 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Sara Bareilles helped the Academy pay tribute to lives lost this year during the Oscarcast’s In Memoriam segment. The “Waitress” songstress sang Judy Collins’ “Both Sides Now” while the annual video honored Carrie FisherDebbie ReynoldsJohn Hurt, Mary Tyler Moore, Anton Yelchin, Prince, Garry Marshall, Ken Howard, and more.

The cutoff for including deaths in the segment is usually around Jan. 31. Therefore, David Bowie was included in last year’s Oscar ceremony. Bill Paxton, who died Saturday, was remembered by an emotional Jennifer Aniston before she introduced the segment.

The segment saluted the more recognizable names and faces in addition to below-the-line creatives and executives. As in years past, the Academy asked attendees to hold their applause until the end to avoid favoritism and any disrespect toward the lesser-known honorees.

Related

Academy Award Winners 2017: Updated List

“Sara’s unique artistry will honor those we’ve lost in our community, »

- Dani Levy

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Art Directors Guild Awards 2017: ‘La La Land’ and ‘Hidden Figures’ Lead Winners

11 February 2017 10:10 PM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The 21st Annual Art Directors Guild Excellence in Production Design Awards ceremony was billed as a “Return to Hollywood.” Backdrops from classic films dotted the interior of the Ray Dolby Ballroom lobby. Johnny Crawford and his Orchestra kicked off the evening’s festivities with “Hooray for Hollywood.” Even a handful of the evening’s big winners were films that fit the theme perfectly.

As expected, “La La Land” continued its storybook run through awards season, with David Wasco’s team winning for Contemporary Film. In an upset, Wynn Thomas and the team from “Hidden Figures” took home honors in Period Film, despite “Hail, Caesar!” being the only of the category’s nominees to also pick up a nom for Oscars night. “It’s been a long journey to this moment,” said Thomas, who described being nominated at the very first Art Directors Guild award for “Mars Attacks!” “I’m so »

- Steve Greene

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Theater Review: Brown Paper Box Co. Dances ‘The Baltimore Waltz’

29 January 2017 8:54 AM, PST | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – During the scourge of the AIDS epidemic, at its height in the late 1980s, a playwright lost her brother to the condition. Inspired by him, Paula Vogel wrote “The Baltimore Waltz,” a story about her and her brother’s travels through Europe – and filtered through the prism of fantasy and the movies. The Brown Paper Box Company presents a re-staging of the play in Chicago through February 19th, 2017.

Play Rating: 3.5/5.0

Using the modern tools of storefront theater – computerized music cues, slideshow presentation and creative use of space – Brown Paper Box Company takes us on a travelogue through Europe, with a brother and sister duo, trailed by the mysterious “Third Man.” The three person cast create a passionate show of madness and mystery, having symbolically to do with the suddenness of the AIDS crisis, and how loved ones were absorbed and lost so quickly. The “waltz” in the title is the dance of life, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006 | 2002

1-20 of 27 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


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