An actor is playing Claude Debussy in a film about the composer's life, and finds himself identifying with his subject very closely.

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(dialogue), (scenario) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

Episode cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Pierre Louis / Film Director
Annette Robertson ...
Gaby Dupont
Iza Teller ...
Madame Bardac (as Isa Teller)
Penny Service ...
Lily
...
The Actor
Stephanie Randall ...
Secretary
Jane Lumb ...
Yvonne Antrobus
Verity Edmett ...
Zohra the slave girl
Janet Fairhead
Alison Fiske
Ian Flintoff
Elna Pearl
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An actor is playing Claude Debussy in a film about the composer's life, and finds himself identifying with his subject very closely.

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Documentary

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18 May 1965 (UK)  »

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Featured in A British Picture (1989) See more »

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User Reviews

 
arty but engrossing early Russell classic
12 May 2009 | by (United Kingdom) – See all my reviews

When Ken Russell was working on his series of short films about composers for the BBC, including Elgar, Delibes, and this one about Debussy, it was hard to see that his style would evolve into the excesses of Tommy and The Lair of the White Worm. Still, his early work is well worth seeing and is echoed in some of his later work such as Savage Messiah and to some extent, Valentino and The Music Lovers.

In this Monitor episode, Russell regular Oliver Reed plays the composer in a series of voice overs, as well as a more modern reflection.Vladek Sheybal plays the slightly cynical narrator as well as a character in Debussy's life, Pierre Louis, who likes to do unmentionable things with young girls. Love interest Gaby is the elfin Annette Robertson, looking almost too modern and knowing for the time.

This is clearly a 60s film, looking back as well as forward. The effect is rather mixed, but magical, and it is beautifully filmed and developed. The kind of thing the BBC just aren't interested in anymore

  • The Debussy Film, Monitor, or Ken Russell just wouldn't get their


foot in the door on TV today.


10 of 11 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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