A Child Is Waiting (1963) - News Poster

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Smackdown 1963: Three from "Tom Jones" and Two Dames

Presenting the Supporting Actresses of '63. Well well, what have we here? This year's statistical uniqueness (the only time one film ever produced three supporting actress nominees) and the character lineup reads juicier than it actually is - your Fab Five are, get this: a saucy wench, a pious auntie, a disgraced lady, a pillpopping royal, and a stubborn nun.

The Nominees 

from left to right: Cilento, Evans, Redman, Rutherford, Skalia

In 1963 Oscar voters went for an all-first-timers nominee list in Supporting Actress. The eldest contenders would soon become Dames (Margaret Rutherford and Edith Evans were both OBEs at the time). Rutherford, the eventual winner, was the only nominee with an extensive film history and she was in the middle of a hot streak with her signature role as Jane Marple which ran across multiple films from through 1961-1965. In fact, Agatha Christie had just dedicated her new book "The
See full article at FilmExperience »

Judy by the Numbers: "Snowflakes"

What on odd year is 1963 in the history of Judy Garland. 1964 marks the last year of Judy Garland's film career, and the boom of Judy's television career. The first of Judy's final two movies reunited Judy Garland with producer Stanley Kramer and actor Burt Lancaster, with whom she'd worked only two years before in Judgment at Nuremburg. By the early 1960s, Kramer was establishing himself as the prestige producer of hard-hitting social issue cinema. A Child Is Waiting, about an institution for developmentally challenged children, was no different.

The Movie: A Child is Waiting (Universal, 1963)

The Songwriter: Marjorie D. Kurtz

The Players: Judy Garland, Burt Lancaster, Gena Rowlands, directed by John Cassavetes

The Story: While the majority of Judy Garland's career was dominated by Technicolor musical extravaganzas, the last few films of her career do signal an attempt at darker, "more serious" work. Surrounded by Method artists like Rowlands,
See full article at FilmExperience »

Steven Hill, D.A. Adam Schiff on ‘Law & Order,’ Dies at 94

Steven Hill, who starred for years as District Attorney Adam Schiff on “Law & Order” and decades earlier played the leader of the Impossible Missions Force before Peter Graves on TV’s “Mission: Impossible,” died Tuesday in Monsey, N.Y., his daughter Sarah Gobioff told The New York Times.

He was also a top character actor in films of the 1980s and early ’90s including “Rich and Famous,” “Yentl,” “Garbo Talks” and Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle “Raw Deal”; “Legal Eagles,” in which he would, as in “Law & Order” a few years later, play the New York district attorney; “Heartburn”; “Brighton Beach Memoirs”; “Running on Empty”; “White Palace”; “Billy Bathgate”; and “The Firm.”

Hill played Schiff from the show’s first season in 1990 until 2000, when Hill resigned; within the show Schiff was said to have accepted a position coordinating commemorations of the Holocaust Project and goes on to work with Simon Wiesenthal. Replacing Schiff as D.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Gena Rowlands on Working With John Cassavetes, Why Everyone Loves ‘The Notebook’

Gena Rowlands on Working With John Cassavetes, Why Everyone Loves ‘The Notebook’
John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands are still considered the king and queen of independent cinema.

Operating outside the studio system, the husband and wife team created indelible portraits of working-class strivers and small-timers in such films as “A Woman Under the Influence,” “Gloria” and “Faces.” Those works, as well as seven others, will screen as part of a retrospective at New York’s Metrograph theater from July 15-25. The career appreciation will include such Cassavetes and Rowlands pairings as “Love Streams” and “Opening Night,” along with films that Cassavetes directed without his wife and muse, such as “A Child is Waiting” and “Husbands.”

Cassavetes died in 1989, but Rowlands has remained active, appearing on the big and small screen in the likes of “The Notebook,” “Hysterical Blindness” and “Unhook the Stars.” She spoke with Variety about Cassavetes’ legacy, how roles improved for actresses and why she loves Bette Davis.

Why do your husband’s films endure?
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lolo | Review

A Child is Waiting: Delpy’s Return to RomCom a Mixed Bag

Julie Delpy has managed to balance a terrific (and prolific) career as an actress and director, breaking out over the past decade as a pragmatic purveyor of romantic entanglements thanks to her twin titles 2 Days in Paris (2007) and 2 Days in New York (2012). Although The Countess (2008), her curious English language examination of the bloodthirsty historical figure Countess Bathory was unfortunately belabored, her tendency to portray complex romantic scenarios masquerading as fluff has proven to be her overarching strength. Which is exactly why her latest, Lolo, a sometimes pleasant endeavor, feels like more of a crass disappointment than it really is. Examining an overworked single mother’s attempt to rediscover romance despite the secret sabotage of her spoiled adult child, the narrative’s dependence on familiar tropes, not to mention the neglect of its central romance, bears remarkable similarity
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

A Child is Waiting | Blu-ray Review

Though it’s a famously compromised vision, to be sure, director John Cassavetes’ third film, A Child is Waiting, represents an important cinematic juncture. Meant to highlight society’s cruelty exacted upon handicapped children via behind-the-scenes details of a new cutting edge school run by an objective physician, the film’s noble ambitions were unfortunately marred by creative forces in disagreement.

After the fallout of his experiences with studio filmmaking, Cassavetes wouldn’t return until 1968 with the landmark Faces, and thus begin building a filmography earning him the moniker ‘father of independent cinema.’ And yet, there’s a scarred, dignified beauty about this troubled motion picture, perhaps as easily identifiable as the warring schools of thought amongst its main protagonists in the film.

A box office failure, it received a cool critical reception, disowned by its director after he was fired in post-production by producer Stanley Kramer. It’s unavoidable
See full article at IONCINEMA.com »

Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: Black Friday Edition

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

Note: With Black Friday approaching and many deals already underway, this week’s column will be dedicated to the event as we highlight some of our favorite deals (see all of them here). Check out our rundown below, with updates as they arrive, and if you’re looking for new Blu-ray releases, there are four definite essential releases this week: Akira Kurosawa‘s Ikiru, D.A. Pennebaker‘s Dont Look Back, the excellent animation Shaun the Sheep, and The Quay Brothers: Collection.
See full article at The Film Stage »

Gena Rowlands Turns 85: Hear Her Rare Conversation on 'A Woman Under the Influence'

Gena Rowlands Turns 85: Hear Her Rare Conversation on 'A Woman Under the Influence'
Gena Rowlands, who turns 85 today, is a cinema nonpareil who showed many faces in the films of her husband: a broken-down housewife in "A Woman Under the Influence," a washed-up thespian in "Opening Night," a desperate call-girl in "Faces." Cassavetes originally wrote "A Woman Under the Influence," the raw story of a lovably mad housewife who is also a danger to herself, as a play for his muse and partner. But it proved to be too exhausting for a stage production and so the maverick indie director turned to family and friends, including Peter Falk, who co-stars in the film as Rowlands' patient husband, for money and rounded up AFI students to make this volatile film that nabbed them both Oscar nominations. Listen below to a rare 90-minute interview about the film, and filmmaking. This was Rowlands fifth pairing with Cassavetes after "Shadows," "A Child Is Waiting," "Faces" and "Minnie and Moskowitz.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Listen: John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands Give Rare 1975 'Woman Under the Influence' Talk

Listen: John Cassavetes and Gena Rowlands Give Rare 1975 'Woman Under the Influence' Talk
Cassavetes originally wrote "A Woman Under the Influence," the raw story of a lovably mad housewife who is also a danger to herself, as a play for his muse and partner Gena Rowlands. But it proved to be too exhausting for a stage production and so the maverick indie director turned to family and friends, including Peter Falk, who co-stars in the film as Rowlands' patient husband, for money and rounded up AFI students to make this volatile film that nabbed them both Oscar nominations. Listen below to a rare 90-minute interview about the film, and filmmaking. This was Rowlands fifth pairing with Cassavetes after "Shadows," "A Child Is Waiting," "Faces" and "Minnie and Moskowitz." Together they would go on to make some of the most startling films of the century, from "Opening Night" to "Love Streams." Watch a Beautiful Tribute Reel to Gena Rowlands
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Watch a Beautiful Tribute Reel to Gena Rowlands

Watch a Beautiful Tribute Reel to Gena Rowlands
Before inimitable blonde bombshell Gena Rowlands became one half of an indie "it" couple alongside actor/director John Cassevetes, she had her start on television and in the films "High Cost of Living" and "Lonely Are the Brave." She starred in Cassavetes' early (and seemingly for-hire effort) "A Child Is Waiting" before busting out of the screen in his excruciatingly intense black-and-white chamber drama "Faces" (1968). In 1975, she was Oscar-nominated for the role that defines her career as a lovable but severely mentally unwound housewife in "A Woman Under the Influence." Back in January, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association awarded the cinema nonpareil its Career Achievement Award. In spirit, Lafca member Chuck Wilson and filmmaker Matt Amato put together this career-spanning reel (below), with sound-bytes from Rowlands herself overlapping the actress' most alluring screen moments.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Gena Rowlands To Get the Los Angeles Film Critics Career Achievement Award

Gena Rowlands To Get the Los Angeles Film Critics Career Achievement Award
The stage, TV and screen actress is best known for her stellar work on ten films directed by her husband John Cassavetes which started with “A Child Is Waiting” (1963), “Shadows” (1959) and “Faces” (1968) and continued through two Oscar-nominated performances in "Woman Under the Influence" (pictured, 1975) and "Gloria" (1981); their last film together was “Love Streams” (1984). The Lafca gave Cassavetes the career achievement award in 1986--this is the first husband and wife team to be so rewarded in the group's 40 year history. Rowlands began her career on the New York stage in the mid-1950s and moved to television, marryingCassavetes in 1954 and made 10 films with him, from Rowlands won four Emmys --“The Betty Ford Story” (1987), “Face of a Stranger” (1991), “Hysterical Blindness” (2003) and “The Incredible Mrs. Ritchie” (2004)--and two Golden Globes (“The Betty Ford Story” and “A Woman Under the Influence.")....
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Director and Actress Duos: The Best, Overlooked, and Underrated

Riffing on Terek Puckett’s terrific list of director/actor collaborations, I wanted to look at some of those equally impressive leading ladies who served as muses for their directors. I strived to look for collaborations that may not have been as obviously canonical, but whose effects on cinema were no less compelling. Categorizing a film’s lead is potentially tricky, but one of the criteria I always use is Anthony Hopkins’s performance in Silence of the Lambs, a film in which he is considered a lead but appears only briefly; his character is an integral part of the story.

The criteria for this article is as follows: The director & actor team must have worked together at least 3 times with the actor in a major role in each feature film, resulting in a minimum of 2 must-see films.

One of the primary trends for the frequency of collaboration is the
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Burt Lancaster Movie Schedule: Scorpio, The Killers, Brute Force

Burt Lancaster on TCM: The Leopard, Scorpio, The Killers I haven't watched Michael Winner's Scorpio (1973), an unflattering portrayal of Us foreign policy and the CIA that reunited Lancaster with his The Leopard co-star Alain Delon. As per the TCM synopsis, "a CIA hit man [Lancaster] is stalked by a former partner [Delon] when the agency turns on him." A Man for All Seasons' Best Actor Oscar winner Paul Scofield and Gayle Hunnicutt are also in the cast. Robert Siodmak's 1946 film noir The Killers is one of the best-looking efforts in the genre thanks to Elwood Bredell's glistening black-and-white cinematography. Although The Killers turned newcomer Lancaster into a major star, as far as I'm concerned this adaptation of Ernest Hemingway's short story belongs to Ava Gardner; in fact, The Killers could just as easily have been called "The Leopardess (La gattaparda)." Edmond O'Brien co-stars. For The Killers, Siodmak
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Burt Lancaster on TCM: The Leopard, A Child Is Waiting, Seven Days In May

Claudia Cardinale, Burt Lancaster, Alain Delon, The Leopard Burt Lancaster is Turner Classic Movies' "Summer Under the Stars" featured star today, August 25. TCM is presenting 11 Burt Lancaster movies, including two premieres: The Leopard and Scorpio. [Burt Lancaster Movie Schedule.] A powerful but hammy leading man who developed into a first-rate mature actor-star in movies such as Luchino Visconti's Conversation Piece and Louis Malle's Atlantic City, Lancaster had a long, eclectic, and prestigious career both in Hollywood and abroad. Imagine Gary Cooper, Cary Grant, James Stewart, Clark Gable, or John Wayne working with Visconti and Malle, not to mention Bernardo Bertolucci (Novecento / 1900), John Cassavetes (A Child Is Waiting), and Bill Forsyth (Local Hero). TCM is now showing Cassavetes' A Child Is Waiting (1963), quite possibly the director's most accessible — i.e., commercial — effort. Produced by Stanley Kramer, a filmmaker with a strong (at times overly so) sense of (liberal) social commitment, and directed by
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Hallelujah! A Judy Garland Retrospective

The Lincoln Center and the Paley Center here in NYC have joined forces to celebrate the all-singing all-dancing legend that is Judy Garland

Shout 'Hallelujah', c'mon get happy!"

Once upon a time she was dubbed "The World's Greatest Entertainer." Few celebrities have ever earned their PR self-mythologizing titles the way Judy G did. There's just no beating her for musical pleasure and cathartic heartbreak. And as if her sensational singing and dancing weren't enough, she was a fine actress, too!

I missed the first week of the celebration being in Michigan but I'll see what I can catch for the remainder of the summer program which ends August 9th. If you're not in New York City, you can always follow along at home as best you can with an impromptu DVD festival.

 

Still to come in the festival are...

Young Judy:

Everybody Sing (1938), For Me and My Gal (1942), Presenting Lily Mars
See full article at FilmExperience »

All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! July 26 – August 9

Impressive retrospective of Judy Garland.s films will feature 31 titles including a presentation of seldom seen short films and rarities as well as a special .sing-along. screening of The Wizard Of Oz.

On the occasion of what would have been Judy Garland.s 89th birthday, the Film Society of Lincoln Center and The Paley Center have announced the details today for Fslc.s comprehensive retrospective of the peerless film icon.s work, All Singin., All Dancin., All Judy! which will screen at the Walter Reade Theater July 26 . August 9 and The Paley Center.s comprehensive retrospective of Garland.s television work,Judy Garland: The Television Years which will be presented July 20 . August 18.

With autumn marking the 75th anniversary of Judy Garland’s feature film debut (Pigskin Parade, 1936), the Film Society of Lincoln Center will screen 31 titles from July 26 . August 9, including each of her big-screen acting performances, to pay tribute to
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Out of the Past 2010: Top 5 Old Fashioneds

  • MUBI
We at Mubi think that celebrating the films of 2010 should be a celebration of film viewing in 2010. Since all film and video is "old" one way or another, we present Out of a Past, a small (re-) collection of some of our favorite of 2010's retrospective viewings.

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This is a list of older movies I saw for the first time in 2010—not necessarily the best, but the ones that gave me the greatest sense of discovery. It’s a sad commentary on contemporary film culture that only five of the twelve films I mention are available on Netflix.

Routine Pleasures (Jean-Pierre Gorin, USA, 1986)

An essay film from the Godard’s former collaborator during his leftist Dziga Vertov Group days. The movie begins as a documentary about a group of model train enthusiasts in San Diego who have constructed an elaborate imaginary world with enormous and minutely detailed landscapes and a
See full article at MUBI »

See also

Showtimes | External Sites