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The Birds (1963) More at IMDbPro »


2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 65 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Video Essay: "Shapes of Rage"

31 August 2015 7:25 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

The eighth entry in an on-going series of audiovisual essays by Cristina Álvarez López and Adrian Martin.***Cinephilia—in the form in which it can be shared by spectators and filmmakers alike—has two extreme poles, and both of them are associated with fierce, intense drives. There is the cinephilia aligned with love in all its manifestations: romanticism, desire, tenderness, hope. And then there is the cinephilia aligned with aggression, violence, a death-drive. Neither, in an important sense, should be regarded entirely literally: many things on the face of this earth slip under and between love and aggressivity, and these metamorphosing states can stand for, or become attached to, every kind of social, political situation. Samuel Fuller knew the score, in his famous pronouncement for Pierrot le fou (1965): “Film is like a battleground. Love. Hate. Action. Violence. Death. In one word…emotion.” And emotion can be never constrained or »

- Cristina Álvarez López & Adrian Martin

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Tippi Hedren Gets Vienna Film Fest Tribute

21 August 2015 8:05 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Lovers of "Marnie," Alfred Hitchcock's 1964 psychosexual pas de deux with Tippi Hedren that placed weirdly high on a recent BBC critics' poll of the best movies ever, are in for a treat at this year's Vienna fest. The quintessential Hitchcock blonde gets her very own tribute, titled Choreography of Desire, including screenings of that film, "The Birds" and her recently re-released film maudit "Roar," co-starring her daughter Melanie Griffith. Read More: 'Citizen Kane' Still the Best American Movie Ever, According to BBC Critics Poll The now-unspooling Viennale lineup also includes an ode to late filmmaker Manoel de Oliveira, who died this year at age 106, presented by fellow Portuguese auteur Pedro Costa. Highlights of the feature film lineup include Sundance titles "Diary of a Teenage Girl," "Dope," "End of the Tour" and "Tangerine," as well as other festival faves such as Alex Ross Perry's "Queen of »

- Ryan Lattanzio

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Daily | Viennale 2015 Lineup

21 August 2015 5:30 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

They're calling it a "Preview," but what the Vienna International Film Festival has unveiled today looks to be pretty much the bulk of its lineup for its 2015 edition. Tippi Hedren will be on hand for a screening of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds. Other highlights include Pedro Costa's tribute to Manoel de Oliveira, special programs dedicated to Raúl Perrone and Federico Veiroj, documentaries by Thom Andersen, Les Blank, Adam Curtis and Frederick Wiseman, new features by Woody Allen, Corneliu Porumboiu, Hou Hsiao-Hsien, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Sean Baker, Alex Ross Perry, Britni West and more. » - David Hudson »

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93 movie remakes and reboots currently in the works

19 August 2015 2:05 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From The Craft and The Birds to The Fugitive and She's All That, the many film reboots and remakes currently in the works...

Over the years that Den Of Geek has been going, we've regularly been charting the assortment of reboots and remakes that are making their way through the Hollywood system. This, then, is the current state of play. We've removed a bunch of projects that seem utterly dead - the once mooted remakes of Videodrome and Timecrimes, for instance - but we'll keep this list up to date as and when we hear of more.

Without further ado, here's what's coming up...

Akira

One of Hollywood's most on and off projects, the current state of the live action Akira remake is that it's back in the works. Marco J Ramirez, the showrunner for season 2 of Netflix's Daredevil show, has been hired to pen a screenplay. Warner Bros is still backing the film, »

- simonbrew

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Locarno round-up: Film Republic takes Carte Blanche title

10 August 2015 4:38 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

In other news: Doc Alliance winner revealed; Viennale boss signs to 2018; update to reports of Tunisian filmmakers pulling titles.

UK sales company Film Republic has picked up international sales for Brazilian director José Pedro Goulart’s feature debut Point Zero (Ponto Zero) - one of the films presented in Locarno’s Carte Blanche showcase dedicated to Brazil last year.

The co-production between Porto Alegre-based Minima and Okna Producoes centres on one fateful night when a young boy, faced with many challenges at home and in school, has to learn to grow up very quickly after stealing his violent father’s car to find a call girl whose number he found of the windscreen.

Film Republic’s managing director Xavier Henry-Rashid is in Locarno this week for the international premire at the independent Critics’ Week of Karolina Bielawska’s award-winning Polish documentary Call Me Marianna.

He is also handling two Swiss titles:

Claudia Lorenz’s first feature What’s »

- screen.berlin@googlemail.com (Martin Blaney)

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Raising Caine on TCM: From Smooth Gay Villain to Tough Guy in 'Best British Film Ever'

5 August 2015 11:27 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Michael Caine young. Michael Caine movies: From Irwin Allen bombs to Woody Allen classic It's hard to believe that Michael Caine has been around making movies for nearly six decades. No wonder he's had time to appear – in roles big and small and tiny – in more than 120 films, ranging from unwatchable stuff like the Sylvester Stallone soccer flick Victory and Michael Ritchie's adventure flick The Island to Brian G. Hutton's X, Y and Zee, Joseph L. Mankiewicz's Sleuth (a duel of wits and acting styles with Laurence Olivier), and Alfonso Cuarón's Children of Men. (See TCM's Michael Caine movie schedule further below.) Throughout his long, long career, Caine has played heroes and villains and everything in between. Sometimes, in his worst vehicles, he has floundered along with everybody else. At other times, he was the best element in otherwise disappointing fare, e.g., Philip Kaufman's Quills. »

- Andre Soares

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Fantasia 2015 Must See Films (Week One)

9 July 2015 8:06 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

My original plan was to publish a list of my ten most anticipated films screening at the Fantasia Film Festival but considering the incredible line-up this year, I find it near impossible to narrow it down to only ten. So instead I’ve decided to select one movie a day, or better yet, the movie that you should choose if you only had time for one.

Day 1. Tangerine

Christmas Eve in Tinseltown!

If you’re not familiar with director Sean Baker start taking notes. The man is a genius and one of the best indie American filmmakers working today. In Starlet, Baker spun an unlikely friendship between a young porn actress and an old lady in the San Fernando Valley. In Prince of Broadway, he chronicled the struggles of a hustler balancing fatherhood while working in New York’s wholesale district. Baker’s work avoids labels by refusing to adhere »

- Ricky

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New Projects: ‘The Birds’, ‘Monopoly’, and ‘Ashley’s War’

2 July 2015 8:31 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Every time it feels like Hollywood has decided to remake a property that couldn’t be more sacred, they one up the ante. Michael Bay has been prepping a remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s suspense/horror classic The Birds, and Variety reports that the project has now found its director: Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen. Van Rooijen has directed the thrillers Tape and Daylight previously, but never a film in the English language.

Hitchcock’s film from 1963, arguably his last great movie and the story of how birds terrorized a small town in Northern California, has never been officially remade, but its influences are everywhere. Heck, even Jurassic World has a scene with pterodactyls worthy of Hitch.

No details on additional plot points or when production is expected to begin have yet been revealed.

So far the list of movies based on board games includes Clue, Battleship, Jumanji, and maybe someday, »

- Brian Welk

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Van Rooijen To Helm "The Birds" Remake

2 July 2015 4:10 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen has been hired to direct the remake of Alfred Hitchcock's classic thriller "The Birds" for Platinum Dunes, Mandalay Pictures and Universal Pictures.

The original film, based on the shorty story by Daphne du Maurier, followed a San Francisco socialite who moves to a small northern California town that suddenly comes under attack from various types of birds.

No word on what the new one's story will be. Michael Bay, Andrew Form, Brad Fuller, Peter Guber and David Zelon will produce.

Source: Variety »

- Garth Franklin

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The Birds: Platinum Dunes hires director for remake

1 July 2015 10:39 PM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

The remake of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds is still very much an active project...

To answer your question: no, nothing's sacred.

There's not a great number of people who get to the end of Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds and reckon that it needs a fresh approach. But the team at Michael Bay's Platinum Dunes appear to be on that very short list.

For some time now, there's been talk of a remake of The Birds, but after hearing nothing for a while, we thought the idea had been quietly dropped. Yet we thought wrong. News now reaches us that the new The Birds has found a director, and very much remains an active project.

Dutch director Diederik Van Rooijen is the man chosen to take on directing duties. It'll mark his English language feature debut, having enjoyed success in Holland with films such as Taped.

Little is known thus »

- simonbrew

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The Birds Remake Lands Director Diederik Van Rooijen

1 July 2015 12:07 PM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

It takes a bold individual to think to themselves, "You know, Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds could use a remake," and a bolder one still to put that plan into motion. Enter Michael Bay and his Platinum Dunes production company, who have teamed up with Peter Guber's Mandalay Pictures to revisit and remake the 1963 horror classic. Along with Universal, the production companies have now tapped director Diederik Van Rooijen (Daylight) to helm the picture. Variety reports that Van Rooijen is leading the flock on The Birds remake, but no new plot details are available at this point. The original film, adapted from Daphne Du Maurier's short story, centered on a San Francisco socialite who moves north to a small California town, only to find that it's come under attack from various types of birds. If you're unfamiliar with the picture, this trailer should help give you a general idea »

- Dave Trumbore

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The Birds Remake Finds a Director

1 July 2015 9:03 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Michael Bay's production company, Platinum Dunes, is set to remake lfred Hitchcock's The Birds, and today they've found a director to bring it to life.  Come inside to learn more!

Alfred Hitchcock, the master of suspense has a long filmmography to pick and choose from.  With Hollywood remaking just about everything in sight, it's no surprise that The Birds is up next.  Michael Bay is producing the upcoming flick, and today, Variety has revealed that there's a director lined up and ready: 

After successfully remaking several 80s slasher films, Michael Bay and his Platinum Dunes banner look ready to remake one of the master of suspense’s classic films alongside Peter Guber’s Mandalay Pictures.

Platinum Dunes, Mandalay Pictures and Universal have tapped Dutch filmmaker Diederik Van Rooijen to direct the remake of Alfred Hitchcock’s “The Birds.”

Rooijen doesn't have a very large body of work, so it's »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Jordan Maison)

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Beautiful Disasters: "Roar"

29 June 2015 8:47 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

There is a case to be made for home movies as the purest form of cinema. It’s folly, of course, to pit films against one another based on the circumstances under which they were made; to argue what is realer, and thus more valid, than the other. In a camera’s lens, especially, the lines of truth and lies blur and overlap. It’s just that in what we believe to be reality the stakes are always higher, the emotions elevated. One of the first films ever made, the Lumière brothers’ L'arrivée d'un train à La Ciotat, was a succinct 56 seconds that depicted the arrival of a train at its station in Lyon, France. When it was first shown to the public it was the audience’s virgin film-viewing experience, and it was reported that many were frightened by the illusion that the train was coming straight for them. »

- Oliver Skinner

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What Scares You?

24 June 2015 10:47 PM, PDT | MoreHorror | See recent MoreHorror news »

Written by Tom Wood

MoreHorror.com

What, who, why or even how did your fascination with Horror begin? I will give you a minute to think whilst I set the scene. The other day, I was driving my car to work; A journey that has been done a thousand times before and as a result, it has become so tedious; so pathetically boring; I could probably do it with my eyes closed and without thinking (not that I will of course, that would just be plain dangerous on so many levels); But my point is, whilst I was driving, a question, not just any old question, but that question popped and buried itself deep into the back of my head. A simple question of What made me interested in Horror? Had evolved and mutated like a diseased zombie into further questioning and so forth, that in the end, a whole »

- admin

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Cocoon Turns 30: Ron Howard’s Fable is Still an Ageless Sci-Fi Classic

21 June 2015 12:38 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Death is inevitable. That’s a universal truth we all learn at a very early age and as we get older, the reality of that truism becomes more and more evident with each passing day. But what if you didn’t have to die? What if you could live forever? That wish fulfillment was precisely what a then up-and-coming filmmaker Ron Howard explored back in 1985 with his wondrous fable, Cocoon. It’s a remarkable film for many reasons, but what has always made it so memorable for me was the way Howard managed to create such a vivid, dignifying and endearing portrait of octogenarian life that demonstrated how the elderly can still enjoy a fulfilling existence even if the rest of the world no longer recognizes their vitality.

This month, Howard’s wondrously heartfelt fable turns 30 and it feels like the perfect time celebrate this remarkably unique film that defied the odds for many reasons, »

- Heather Wixson

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Round-Up: Watch The Gallows Opening Scene, The Town That Dreaded Sundown, Supernatural Mystery Minis

16 June 2015 8:46 AM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

The first official clip for The Gallows has been revealed courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures UK. Also in this round-up: The Town That Dreaded Sundown Blu-ray and DVD details and news on the release of Supernatural Mystery Minis.

The Gallows: A Blumhouse film from Warner Bros. Pictures, The Gallows hits theaters in the U.S. on July 10th. Written and directed by Chris Lofing and Travis Cluff, The Gallows stars Cassidy Gifford, Ryan Shoos, Reese Mishler, and Pfeifer Brown.

"Twenty years after an accident caused the death of the lead actor during a high school play, students at the same small town school resurrect the failed stage production in a misguided attempt to honor the anniversary of the tragedy—but ultimately find out that some things are better left alone."

Trailer from MTV:

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The Town That Dreaded Sundown: Produced by Jason Blum and Ryan Murphy, The Town That Dreaded Sundown »

- Tamika Jones

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100 Essential Action Scenes: Attacks!

11 June 2015 8:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Sound on Sight undertook a massive project, compiling ranked lists of the most influential, unforgettable, and exciting action scenes in all of cinema. There were hundreds of nominees spread across ten different categories and a multi-week voting process from 11 of our writers. The results: 100 essential set pieces, sequences, and scenes from blockbusters to cult classics to arthouse obscurities.

If you’ve seen a film montage in the last 10 years, then you’ve been witness to at least one of the scenes mentioned on this list: the vibrating water glass from Jurassic Park signaling the T-Rex prowling nearby. It’s the perfect type of image to tell the audience: something is coming. These flashes of exhilaration are fan-favorites, and it’s no surprise to see them featured prominently as the centerpieces for some of the greatest films ever. It’s the invasion when the aliens come out of the sky, the »

- Shane Ramirez

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Review: "Once A Thief" (1965) Starring Alain Delon, Ann-margret, Van Heflin And Jack Palance; Warner Archive DVD Release

31 May 2015 10:34 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

One of the most rewarding byproducts of reviewing movies for a living is that you will often encounter some prominent gem that somehow managed to escape your attention previously. In certain cases, it's arguable that a film might well be more appreciated many years later than it was during its initial release. Such a case pertains to the 1965 crime drama Once a Thief. Directed by the under-rated Ralph Nelson, the film successfully invokes the mood and atmosphere of the classic black-and-white film noir crime thrillers of the 1940s and 1950s. Although this movie was widely credited as being Alain Delon's first starring role in an English language production, he was among the all-star cast seen the previous year in the big budget Hollywood production of The Yellow Rolls Royce. It is accurate to say, however, that Once a Thief afforded him his first opportunity to be »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Cannes Film Review: ‘Hitchcock/Truffaut’

29 May 2015 11:40 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“In many of the films now being made, there is very little cinema: They are mostly what I call ‘photographs of people talking,’” Alfred Hitchcock told his awestruck French interlocutor, critic-cum-helmer Francois Truffaut, in the indispensable monograph whose 50th anniversary inspired film historian Kent Jones’ “Hitchcock/Truffaut.” The master of suspense referred to his own style, which tried to dispense with dialogue in favor of conveying a story through a sequence of shots, as “pure cinema,” and even though Jones’ documentary relies heavily on talking heads, recycled clips and traditional narration, there’s no question that it embodies pure cinema of a different sort — namely, a complete and total immersion in the medium, by way of a career-spanning appreciation of Hitchcock’s work, designed to echo and extend the impact of Truffaut’s seminal book. Accessible yet intelligent, the 80-minute docu should reward institutional retrospectives and homevideo viewing alike.

Truffaut »

- Peter Debruge

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13 Things to Know About Zoo

28 May 2015 8:06 AM, PDT | Collider.com | See recent Collider.com news »

Based on the best-selling novel by James Patterson, the CBS drama series Zoo is a global thriller about a wave of violent animal attacks against humans. When these strange animal attacks occur, Jackson Oz (James Wolk) is an American zoologist who sees a link between them and his late father’s controversial theories about impending threats to the human race. And as the assaults become more ferocious and calculating, he is forced to unlock the mystery of what’s happening before there’s no place left for people to hide. During a panel at the CBS Summer Junket, to discuss the network’s summer programming, actors James Wolk, Nonso Anozie and Nora Arnezeder, along with author James Patterson and executive producers Jeff Pinkner and Cathy Konrad, talked about how this story originated, what made it a good fit for a TV show, why this series adaptation just might be better than the book itself, »

- Christina Radish

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 65 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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