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1-20 of 35 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Viacom Wishes the Real Stephen Colbert Would Leave the Old Stephen Colbert Alone

28 July 2016 10:22 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Like any late-night host, Stephen Colbert has always been something of a character. Now his former employer wants to know which one it’s going to be.

Colbert for nearly a decade played a bloviating, right-wing talk-show host on Comedy Central’s “Colbert Report” to great renown – so much so that it got him a job at CBS hosting that network’s “Late Show” after David Letterman stepped down from the job. When the host revived the character last week as part of a live series of shows playing off the Republican and Democrat political conventions, he won notice from fans and critics, and, apparently, lawyers at Viacom, the owner of the cable outlet that aired his “Report.”

Colbert made mention of this fact during a live show that aired in the wee hours of Thursday morning, joking to the audience that an unnamed company with an interest in the old Colbert’s affairs had made some »

- Brian Steinberg

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Remembering Michael Cimino, Dead at 77

2 July 2016 2:47 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

It had been a long time since I was in the same room with director Michael Cimino. My first job out of Nyu Cinema Studies was in the publicity department at United Artists in New York, where I witnessed the long delays on Cimino’s follow-up to his Oscar-winning 1978 anti-war diatribe “The Deer Hunter,” the period western “Heaven’s Gate.”

The director got caught up in chasing authenticity in the myriad details of the production, training for weeks the cast led by Kris Kristofferson and Isabelle Huppert to roller-skate for one scene — and demanding endless retakes until he shot more feet of film, over 1 million, than even Francis Coppola did on another memorably out-of-control UA movie, “Apocalypse Now.” The original $11 million budget bloated to $32 million (Cimino’s figure), as recounted in Steven Bach’s “Final Cut: Art, Money and Ego in the Making of ‘Heaven’s Gate.’

“Heaven’s »

- Anne Thompson

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Paul Cox Dies: Australian Indie Film Legend Passes Away at Age 76

19 June 2016 9:53 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Australian filmmaker Paul Cox has died at 76. Regarded as an icon of Aussie cinema — an especially impressive feat considering he was born in the Netherlands and didn’t make his way Down Under until he was 25 — Cox directed a total of 31 feature films: 12 documentaries and 19 narratives. “Innocence,” “Man of Flowers” and “A Woman’s Tale” were among his best-known works. No cause of death has been given, though Cox did survive cancer in 2009 after receiving a liver transplant.

Read More: Engaging With Film At Ebertfest

As noted in a comprehensive RogerEbert.com tribute, Cox once said in an interview that “to also realize we’re going to die one day, to ask questions about death is very important because that makes you more alive and it makes you more of a decent human being.” Full name Paulus Henrique Benedictus Cox, he was born on April 16, 1940 in Venlo and had a »

- Michael Nordine

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The Magnetic Monster

13 June 2016 9:41 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Ivan Tors and Curt Siodmak 'borrow' nine minutes of dynamite special effects from an obscure-because-suppressed German sci-fi picture, write a new script, and come up with an eccentric thriller where atom scientists behave like G-Men crossed with Albert Einstein. The challenge? How to make a faceless unstable atomic isotope into a worthy science fiction 'monster.' The Magnetic Monster Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1953 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 76 min. / Street Date June 14, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Richard Carlson, King Donovan, Jean Byron, Leonard Mudie, Byron Foulger, Michael Fox, Frank Gerstle, Charles Williams, Kathleen Freeman, Strother Martin, Jarma Lewis. Cinematography Charles Van Enger Supervising Film Editor Herbert L. Strock Original Music Blaine Sanford Written by Curt Siodmak, Ivan Tors Produced by Ivan Tors Directed by Curt Siodmak

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

How did we ever survive without an "Office of Scientific Investigation?" In the early 1950s, producer Ivan Tors launched himself with a trio of science fiction movies based on that non-existent government entity, sort of an FBI for strange scientific phenomena. As of this writing, Kino has released a terrific 3-D Blu-ray of the third entry, 1954's Gog. The second Tors Osi mini-epic is the interesting, if scientifically scrambled Riders to the Stars, which shows up from time to time on TCM but has yet to find its way to home video in any format. The first of the series, 1953's The Magnetic Monster is considered the most scientifically interesting, although it mainly promotes its own laundry list of goofy notions about physics and chemistry. As it pretends that it is based on scientific ideas instead of rubber-suited monsters, Tors' abstract threat is more than just another 'thing' trying to abduct the leading lady. Exploiting the common fear of radiation, a force little understood by the general public, The Magnetic Monster invents a whole new secret government bureau dedicated to solving 'dangerous scientific problems' -- the inference being, of course, that there's always something threatening about science. Actually, producer Tors was probably inspired by his partner Curt Siodmak to take advantage of a fantastic special effects opportunity that a small show like Magnetic could normally never afford. More on that later. The script plays like an episode of Dragnet, substituting scientific detectives for L.A.P.D. gumshoes. Top-kick nuclear troubleshooter Dr. Jeff Stewart (Richard Carlson) can't afford to buy a tract home for his pregnant wife Connie (beautiful Jean Byron, later of The Patty Duke Show). He is one of just a few dauntless Osi operatives standing between us and scientific disaster. When local cops route a weird distress call to the Osi office, Jeff and his Phd. sidekick Dan Forbes (King Donovan) discover that someone has been tampering with an unstable isotope in a room above a housewares store on Lincoln Blvd.: every metallic object in the store has become magnetized. The agents trace the explosive element to one Dr. Serny (Michael Fox), whose "lone wolf" experiments have created a new monster element, a Unipolar watchamacallit sometimes referred to as Serranium. If not 'fed' huge amounts of energy this new element will implode, expand, and explode again on a predictable timetable. Local efforts to neutralize the element fail, and an entire lab building is destroyed. Dan and Jeff rush the now-larger isotope to a fantastic Canadian "Deltatron" constructed in a super-scientific complex deep under the ocean off Nova Scotia. The plan is to bombard the stuff with so much energy that it will disintegrate harmlessly. But does the Deltatron have enough juice to do the job? Its Canadian supervisor tries to halt the procedure just as the time limit to the next implosion is coming due! Sincere, likeable and quaint, The Magnetic Monster is nevertheless a prime candidate for chuckles, thanks to a screenplay with a high clunk factor. Big cheese scientist Jeff Stewart interrupts his experimental bombardment of metals in his atom smasher to go out on blind neighborhood calls, dispensing atom know-how like a pizza deliveryman. He takes time out to make fat jokes at the expense of the lab's switchboard operator, the charming Kathleen Freeman. The Osi's super-computer provides instant answers to various mysteries. Its name in this show is the acronym M.A.N.I.A.C.. Was naming differential analyzers some kind of a fetish with early computer men? Quick, which '50s Sci-fi gem has a computer named S.U.S.I.E.? The strange isotope harnesses a vague amalgam of nuclear and magnetic forces. It might seem logical to small kids just learning about the invisible wonder of magnetism -- and that understand none of it. All the silverware at the store sticks together. It is odd, but not enough to cause the sexy blonde saleswoman (Elizabeth Root) to scream and jump as if goosed by Our Friend the Atom. When a call comes in that a taxi's engine has become magnetized, our agents are slow to catch on. Gee, could that crazy event be related to our mystery element? When the culprit scientist is finally tracked down, and pulled off an airliner, he's already near death from overexposure to his own creation. We admire Dr. Serny, who after all managed to create a new element on his own, without benefit of a billion dollar physics lab. He also must be a prize dope for not realizing that the resulting radiation would kill him. The Osi troubleshooters deliver a stern lesson that all of us need to remember: "In nuclear research there is no place for lone wolves." If you think about it, the agency's function is to protect us from science itself, with blame leveled at individual, free-thinking, 'rogue' brainiacs. (Sarcasm alert.) The danger in nuclear research comes not from mad militarists trying to make bigger and more awful bombs; the villains are those crackpots cooking up end-of-the-world scenarios in their home workshops. Dr. Serny probably didn't even have a security clearance! The Magnetic Monster has a delightful gaffe in every scene. When a dangerous isotope is said to be 'on the loose,' a police radio order is broadcast to Shoot To Kill ... Shoot what exactly, they don't say. This line could very well have been invented in the film's audio mix, if producer Tors thought the scene needed an extra jolt. Despite the fact that writer-director Curt Siodmak cooked up the brilliant concept of Donovan's Brain and personally invented a bona fide classic monster mythology, his '50s sci-fi efforts strain credibility in all directions. As I explain in the Gold review, Siodmak may have been the one to come up with the idea of repurposing the climax of the old film. He was a refugee from Hitler's Germany, and had written a film with director Karl Hartl. Reading accounts in books by Tom Weaver and Bill Warren, we learn that the writer Siodmak had difficulty functioning as a director and that credited editor Herbert Strock stepped in to direct. Strock later claimed that the noted writer was indecisive on the set. The truly remarkable aspect of The Magnetic Monster comes in the last reel, when Jeff and Dan take an elevator ride way, way down to Canada's subterranean, sub-Atlantic Deltatron atom-smasher. They're suddenly wearing styles not worn in the early 'fifties -- big blocky coats and wide-brimmed hats. The answer comes when they step out into a wild mad-lab construction worthy of the visuals in Metropolis. A giant power station is outfitted with oversized white porcelain insulators -- even a set of stairs looks like an insulator. Atop the control booth is an array of (giant, what else) glass tubes with glowing neon lights inside. Cables and wires go every which-way. A crew of workers in wrinkled shop suits stands about like extras from The Three-Penny Opera. For quite some time, only readers of old issues of Famous Monsters of Filmland knew the secret of this bizarre footage, which is actually from the 1934 German sci-fi thriller Gold, directed by Karl Hartl and starring Hans Albers and Brigitte Helm. Tors and Siodmak do their best to integrate Richard Carlson and King Donovan into this spectacular twenty-year-old stock footage, even though the extravagant production values and the expressionist patina of the Ufa visuals are a gross mismatch for The Magnetic Monster's '50s semi-docu look. Jeff's wide hat and David Byrne coat are there to make him look more like Hans Albers in the 1934 film, which doesn't work because Albers must be four inches taller and forty pounds beefier than Richard Carlson. Jeff climbs around the Deltatron, enters a control booth and argues with the Canadian scientist/turnkey, who is a much better match for the villain of Gold. Jeff changes into a different costume, with a different cap -- so he can match Albers in the different scene in Gold. The exciting climax repurposes the extravagant special effects of Otto Hunte and Günther Rittau, changing the original film's attempted atomic alchemy into a desperate attempt to neutralize the nasty new element before it can explode again. The matching works rather well for Jeff's desperate struggle to close an enormous pair of bulkhead doors that have been sabotaged. And a matched cut on a whip pan from center stage to a high control room is very nicely integrated into the old footage. The bizarre scene doesn't quite come off... even kids must have known that older footage was being used. In the long shots, Richard Carlson doesn't look anything like Hans Albers. A fuel-rod plunger in the control room displays a German-style cross, even though the corresponding instrument in the original show wasn't so decorated. Some impressive close-up views of a blob of metal being bombarded by atomic particles are from the old movie, and others are new effects. Metallurgy is scary, man. The "Serranium" threat establishes a pattern touched upon by later Sci-fi movies with organic or abstract forces that grow from relative insignificance to world-threatening proportions. The Monolith Monsters proposes giant crystals that grow to the size of skyscrapers, threatening to cover the earth with a giant quartz-pile. The Sam Katzman quickie The Day the World Exploded makes The Magnetic Monster look like an expensive production. It invents a new mineral that explodes when exposed to air. The supporting cast of The Magnetic Monster gives us some pleasant, familiar faces. In addition to the beloved Kathleen Freeman is Strother Martin as a concerned airline pilot. Fussy Byron Foulger owns the housewares store and granite-jawed Frank Gerstle (Gristle?) is a gruff general. The gorgeous Jarma Lewis has a quick bit as a stewardess. The Kl Studio Classics Blu-ray of The Magnetic Monster is a fine transfer of this B&W gem from United Artists. Once hard to see, it was part of an expensive MGM-Image laserdisc set twenty years ago and then an Mod DVD in 2011. The disc comes with a socko original trailer that explains why it did reasonably well at the box office. Every exciting moment is edited into a coming attraction that really hypes the jeopardy factor. At that time, just the sight of a hero in a radiation suit promised something unusual. Nowadays, Hazardous Waste workers use suits like that to clean up common chemical spills. The commentary for The Magnetic Monster is by Fangoria writer Derek Botelho, whose name is misspelled as Botello on the disc package. I've heard Derek on a couple of David del Valle tracks for Vincent Price movies, where he functioned mainly as an Ed McMahon-like fan sidekick. His talk tends to drift into loosely related sidebar observations. Instead of discussing how the movie was made by cannibalizing another, he recounts for us the comedy stock footage discovery scene from Tim Burton's Ed Wood. Several pages recited from memoirs by Curt Siodmak and Herbert Strock do provide useful information on the film. Botelho appreciates actress Kathleen Freeman. You can't go wrong doing that. Viewers that obtain Kino's concurrent Blu-ray release of the original 1934 German thriller Gold will note that the repurposed scenes from that film look much better here, although they still bear some scratches. On a scale of Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor, The Magnetic Monster Blu-ray rates: Movie: Good + Video: Very Good Sound: Excellent Supplements: Commentary with Derek Botelho, Theatrical trailer Deaf and Hearing Impaired Friendly? N0; Subtitles: None Packaging: Keep case Reviewed: June 8, 2016 (5138magn)

Visit DVD Savant's Main Column Page Glenn Erickson answers most reader mail: dvdsavant@mindspring.com

Text © Copyright 2016 Glenn Erickson

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- Glenn Erickson

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The Patty Duke Show, The Partridge Family: Director Harry Falk Dies at 83

9 June 2016 1:06 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

Prolific TV series director, Harry Falk, is dead at the age of 83. His obituary states he died on April 29, 2016. Falk was the first husband of Patty Duke, who passed away March 29, 2016.

Falk got his professional start as an assistant director on The Defenders TV series on CBS (1961) and The Patty Duke Show on ABC (1963-63). It would be on the latter than he is first credited as Director, for a trio of episodes in 1966.

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- TVSeriesFinale.com

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Character Actor William Schallert Dead At Age 93

10 May 2016 3:11 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

William Schallert and Patty Duke.

 

Popular character actor William Schallert has died at age 93, having been active in the acting community right up through recent years. Schallert was a familiar face to retro movie and TV fans, even if his name was not as well known. He is remembered by many for playing the harried father of teenage Patty Duke in the 1960s sitcom "The Patty Duke Show". (In a tragic coincidence, Ms. Duke also recently passed away.) Schallert was much beloved by science fiction and horror fans for his appearances in TV series such as "Commander Cody", "Space Patrol", "Men Into Space" and "The Twilight Zone".

Artist Pete Emslie's tribute to Schallert. (For more of Emslie's artistic creations, visit The Cartoon Cave.)

In feature films Schallert appeared in the cult classics "Them!", "The Incredible Shrinking Man", "Colossus: The Forbin Project" as well as the 1983 feature film "Twilight Zone: The Movie »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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'Trouble With Tribbles' Guest William Schallert Dies

9 May 2016 2:37 PM, PDT | AirlockAlpha.com | See recent Airlock Alpha news »

Mainstream television fans might know him from his days on "The Patty Duke Show," but original "Star Trek" fans are now having to say good-bye to Nilz Baris.That was the character William Schallert played in the popular "Trek" episode "The Trouble With Troubles." Schallert, who would go on to a prolific television and film career with more than 370 credits, died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, California. He was 93.Schallert's character of Baris was an undersecretary in charge of agricultural affairs along the Federation's border with the Klingon Empire, according to Memory Alpha. Baris is the one who brings Capt. Kirk and the USS Enteprise to Deep Space Station K-7 to protect the grain, which was later consumed quite quickly by Tribbles.That was enough to get Baris to threaten Kirk with a hearing »

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SAG-aftra Praises “Remarkable” Ex-sag President William Schallert; ‘Patty Duke Show’ Co-Star Dead At 93 – Update

9 May 2016 11:37 AM, PDT | Deadline TV | See recent Deadline TV news »

Updated with statement from SAG-aftra: William Shallert, former SAG president and co-star on The Patty Duke Show, died on May 8 in Los Angeles. He was 93. Including stints on Star Trek, the 1967 pic In the Heat of the Night, an uncredited appearance in Steve Martin's The Jerk and HBO’s True Blood among many others, the character actor’s career spanned from 1947-2014, when he appeared in an episode of 2 Broke Girls. SAG-aftra today confirmed Shallert’s passing. "Bill… »

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William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

9 May 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards. »

- Laura Haefner

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William Schallert, Former SAG President and ‘Patty Duke Show’ Star, Dies at 93

9 May 2016 10:52 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Former SAG president William Schallert, best known as TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show,” died Sunday in Pacific Palisades, Calif. He was 93. His son Edwin confirmed his death.

His most memorable role was as beloved TV dad Martin Lane on “The Patty Duke Show” (1963-66). The performance still resonates: TV Guide slotted him at No. 39 on its list of Greatest TV Dads of All Time in 2004.

Schallert would be familiar to many for his memorable appearance on the famous “The Trouble With Tribbles” episode of the original “Star Trek” series: He played Nilz Baris, the agriculture undersecretary who is outraged to discover that the furry, endlessly reproducing aliens have devoured all the grain.

Schallert served as SAG president from 1979-81 and oversaw a three-month strike in 1980 that centered around rates and residuals for pay TV, videocassettes and videodiscs and included a successful boycott of the year’s primetime Emmy Awards. »

- Laura Haefner

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12 Memorable Child Actor Performances on TV

1 April 2016 12:30 PM, PDT | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

Child actors have played a crucial role in some of the best shows, miniseries, and movies to air since television’s inception. Today they’re delivering dynamic performances at a rapid pace as the television landscape expands well beyond broadcast and cable. These 12 performances are just a few of dozens of memorable performances given by children, which set the standard for the kind of dramatic and comedic work child actors can produce in the medium. Patty Duke, “The Patty Duke Show”Duke’s career longevity is enviable to any actor starting out in the business. Duke became one of the youngest Oscar winners ever at 16 in 1963 for her mesmerizing portrayal of Helen Keller in “The Miracle Worker.” Duke followed up that performance with her self-titled comedy series “The Patty Duke Show.” At 16, Duke remains the youngest actor ever to front a show named after themselves. Duke’s impressive dual performances »

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Scandals, Affairs and, Finally, Lasting Love: Inside Patty Duke's Colorful Romantic Life

30 March 2016 9:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke died Tuesday at the age of 69. And while her legacy will certainly live on in her many celebrated performances in both film and television, those close to the actress say they'll remember her most for one thing: her ability to love. "The true story of her life isn't her work and it isn't her advocacy, it's the love relationship she's had with her husband Mike for the last 30 years," Duke's son, actor Sean Astin, told the Associated Press. But while Duke found happiness with her husband Michael Pearce, she traveled a winding road to get there. Duke was »

- Jodi Guglielmi, @JodiGug3

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Scandals, Affairs and, Finally, Lasting Love: Inside Patty Duke's Colorful Romantic Life

30 March 2016 9:45 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke died Tuesday at the age of 69. And while her legacy will certainly live on in her many celebrated performances in both film and television, those close to the actress say they'll remember her most for one thing: her ability to love. "The true story of her life isn't her work and it isn't her advocacy, it's the love relationship she's had with her husband Mike for the last 30 years," Duke's son, actor Sean Astin, told the Associated Press. But while Duke found happiness with her husband Michael Pearce, she traveled a winding road to get there. Duke was »

- Jodi Guglielmi, @JodiGug3

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The Patty Duke Show: Patty Duke Dies at 69

29 March 2016 3:35 PM, PDT | TVSeriesFinale.com | See recent TVSeriesFinale news »

[caption id="attachment_46402" align="aligncenter" width="590"] (Disney Channel/Eric McCandless)Tenzing Norgay Trainor, Patty Duke, Dove Cameron[/caption]

Variety reports award winning actress Patty Duke has died at the age of 69. The double-trouble star of the 1963-66 sitcom, The Patty Duke Show, is still well remembered for playing identical cousins Patty and Cathy Lane. Duke's long, successful and varied career stretches back before that series, to her childhood, in the 1950s.

According the the Variety report, Duke's manager, Mitchell Stubbs, confirmed that she died early today, Tuesday, March 29, 2016, due to sepsis from a ruptured intestine. The outlet quotes Stubbs as saying, "She was a wife, a mother, a grandmother, a friend, a mental health advocate and a cultural icon. She will be greatly missed."

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- TVSeriesFinale.com

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'What a Crazy Pair!' Who Can Ever Forget the Patty Duke Show Theme Song?

29 March 2016 2:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke may or may not have thought of the theme song from The Patty Duke Show as part of her legacy, but it's one of the best-written, best-remembered minutes of music ever to launch a subsequent 23 minutes of episodic television nonsense. It ranks up there with the earworm classics from Gilligan’s Island and The Brady Bunch.If you're inclined to debate the point, you might also squeeze in Green Acres. But still. Written by Sid Ramin and Bob Wells (lyrics), the song sets up the show's situation - it's about identical cousins Cathy and Patty, the one rather genteel and British, »

- Tom Gliatto

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'What a Crazy Pair!' Who Can Ever Forget the Patty Duke Show Theme Song?

29 March 2016 2:05 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke may or may not have thought of the theme song from The Patty Duke Show as part of her legacy, but it's one of the best-written, best-remembered minutes of music ever to launch a subsequent 23 minutes of episodic television nonsense. It ranks up there with the earworm classics from Gilligan’s Island and The Brady Bunch.If you're inclined to debate the point, you might also squeeze in Green Acres. But still. Written by Sid Ramin and Bob Wells (lyrics), the song sets up the show's situation - it's about identical cousins Cathy and Patty, the one rather genteel and British, »

- Tom Gliatto

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Remembering Patty Duke: An Actress Who Worked Miracles

29 March 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke falls into her own special niche when one discusses American movie and TV stars: 16 years old when she won her supporting-actress Oscar for her performance as unhearing, unseeing Helen Keller in the 1963 movie The Miracle Worker, she was perhaps the most dramatically formidable teenage actress ever. Her scenes of physical combat with Anne Bancroft, who won Best Actress as Helen's teacher, Annie Sullivan, are hair-raising more than 50 years later. Consider, too, that she followed this up with her own sitcom, The Patty Duke Show (1963-66), in which she split her performance between the roles of identical cousins, one outgoing and American, »

- Tom Gliatto

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Remembering Patty Duke: An Actress Who Worked Miracles

29 March 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Patty Duke falls into her own special niche when one discusses American movie and TV stars: 16 years old when she won her supporting-actress Oscar for her performance as unhearing, unseeing Helen Keller in the 1963 movie The Miracle Worker, she was perhaps the most dramatically formidable teenage actress ever. Her scenes of physical combat with Anne Bancroft, who won Best Actress as Helen's teacher, Annie Sullivan, are hair-raising more than 50 years later. Consider, too, that she followed this up with her own sitcom, The Patty Duke Show (1963-66), in which she split her performance between the roles of identical cousins, one outgoing and American, »

- Tom Gliatto

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Us Briefs: Michelle Monaghan joins 'Patriots Day'

29 March 2016 12:59 PM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Plus: Patty Duke Rip; Lionsgate to screen Now You See Me 2 at CinemaCon; and more…

Michelle Monaghan has joined previously announced J.K. Simmons, Mark Wahlberg, and John Goodman on CBS Films and Lionsgate’s Boston Marathon bombing drama Patriots Day, which has begun filming in Boston. Monaghan will play Carol Saunders, the wife of Sergeant Tommy Saunders, played by Wahlberg. Both are composite characters.

Peter Berg will direct Patriots Day. CBS Films handles production and marketing while Lionsgate will distribute the film. The partners are co-financing the feature, set to open in the Us on December 21. The cast includes Jimmy O. Yang, Vincent Curatola, and James Colby.

Patty Duke, the Oscar-winning actress who won a best supporting actress award aged 16 in The Miracle Worker, died on Tuesday at a hospital in Idaho. She was 69. Duke also starred in TV series The Patty Duke Show and earned an Emmy nomination for that. She is survived »

- jeremykay67@gmail.com (Jeremy Kay)

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Entertainment News: Film, TV Star & Oscar Winner Patty Duke Dies at 69

29 March 2016 12:47 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Coeur D’Alene, Idaho – She was a lesson in duality. One of her most famous roles was as “identical cousins” on “The Patty Duke Show,” and Anna Marie “Patty” Duke also made public her fight with bipolar disorder. She was also a talented actress, winning an Oscar as teenager for “The Miracle Worker.” Ms. Duke passed away on March 29th, 2016, at the age of 69, at her home in Idaho.

Anna Marie Duke (her friends call her “Anna”) became Patty Duke when she was only eight years old. She went on to fame in the role of Helen Keller in the original 1959-61 Broadway run of “The Miracle Worker,” co-starring Anne Bancroft as Annie Sullivan. The film version (1962) garnered Duke the Best Supporting Actress Oscar, the youngest to ever win at the time at age 16. The next year she starred in “The Patty Duke Show,” with its familiar theme song beginning »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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