The Fugitive (1963–1967)

TV Series  -   -  Adventure | Crime | Drama
8.1
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A doctor, wrongly convicted for a murder he didn't commit, escapes custody and must stay ahead of the police to find the real killer.

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Title: The Fugitive (1963–1967)

The Fugitive (1963–1967) on IMDb 8.1/10

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Season:

4 | 3 | 2 | 1

Year:

1967 | 1966 | 1965 | 1964 | 1963
Won 1 Golden Globe. Another 3 wins & 9 nominations. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Dr. Richard Kimble / ... (120 episodes, 1963-1967)
...
 Narrator (120 episodes, 1963-1967)
Barry Morse ...
 Lt. Philip Gerard (119 episodes, 1963-1967)
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Storyline

Dr. Richard Kimble is accused as the murderer of his wife, tried and convicted. On his way to be executed, he escapes. The only chance to prove his innocence is to find the man who killed his wife. Kimble, pursued by Lt. Gerard, risks his life several times when he shows his identity to help other people out of trouble. Written by Florian Baumann <baumann@msmhpd.hoechst.hoechst-ag.dbp.de>

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Details

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Release Date:

17 September 1963 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Fugitive  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(120 episodes)

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)

Color:

(seasons 1-3)| (season 4)

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Some sources incorrectly state that an alternate ending for the series was planned in which Kimble would be seen removing a false arm, revealing him as the true killer. In the book "The Fugitive Recaptured" (and its later audio adaptation) Barry Morse reveals that this rumor may have started with a never-realized plan that he and David Janssen had for pulling a "false arm" gag at public appearances. Janssen also often joked that Kimble killed his wife because "she talked too much". Morse also said that he and Janssen conceived for fun an alternate epilogue to the series finale, in which Kimble awakens in bed with his wife Helen, and reveals to her that he "just had the most horrible nightmare". Janssen also gave an interview to TV Guide at the time of the finale in which he said that his idea for resolving the show was to have a final scene in which Kimble is seen on a beach reading a newspaper account of how the one-armed man has just been executed for the murder. Then, with his trademark half-grin, Kimble would stand up, detach his prosthetic arm and walk off into the surf. It's not known whether he was serious or just kidding. See more »

Quotes

Narrator: Name: Richard Kimble. Profession: Doctor of Medicine. Destination: Death Row, State Prison. Richard Kimble has been tried and convicted for the murder of his wife. But laws are made by men, carried out by men. And men are imperfect. Richard Kimble is innocent. Proved guilty, what Richard Kimble could not prove was that moments before discovering his wife's body, he encountered a man running from the vicinity of his home. A man with one arm. A man he had never seen before. A man who has not yet ...
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Connections

Featured in The Butcher Boy (1997) See more »

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User Reviews

Four Years in the Twilight Zone
10 November 2004 | by (N Syracuse NY) – See all my reviews

According to both my ears and the book 'TV's Biggest Hits' by Jon Burlingame, much of the music we hear in the episodes of the original version of the TV series 'The Fugitive', first appeared on 'The Twilight Zone'. In fact the musical director of 'The Fugitive', once he heard that the show was coming to an end, went up to the late, great, Jerry Goldsmith, who has composed the original tracts when they were used on 'The Twilight Zone', and said 'What's this I hear: they're going to cancel 'our' show!'.

Still, it was an appropriate choice as Richard Kimble spent four years in his own, personal 'Twilight Zone'. If you look at most of the classic episodes of the earlier show, they involve a troubled hero finding himself in a world that doesn't seem to make any sense any more. He convinces himself if he can figure it out, or find a way out of it, things will be OK again. But he never seems to make it- just like so many of our dreams. Kimble's world is shattered by an argument with his wife and her subsequent murder. He's on the run in his own country, now suddenly hostile to him. He has to suppress his emotions and hide his identity while he pursues 'the way out': the one-armed man; and avoids pursuit by Lt. Gerard, the symbol of all his fears. Goldsmith's music was very well used.

I heartily agree with those that rank this as the best TV series ever. Leonard Goldenson was right: it's the best concept for a show ever. Also the best execution. David Janssen's performance is amazing. He's deprived of most of an actor's tools: he keeps his head down and says as little as possible in order to avoid recognition. Yet he conveys this character's feeling perfectly. The tremendous array of guest actors, playing characters in their own little psychological prisons adds great depth to the show. The directing was sharp, well-paced and uncluttered with too many obvious 'techniques'. The writing was consistently good. Pete Rugolo's wonderful main musical theme could be played allegro for excitement or largo for poignancy- and this was the most poignant show ever. It was about psychological alienation. The only other shows I can think of that reached this deep were 'The Twilight Zone' and, occasionally, 'Star Trek'.

This was one of the few classic TV shows of which a movie version was later made that was any good at all. Roy Huggins, the creator of the show, had some input into the Harrison Ford film. That film, compared to the TV show, is rich in money, production values and excitement. It has flashes of characterization that give the action more meaning than most modern day flicks. However the TV was rich in time, with four years of hour long episodes to tell all its various stories. In the end that made it far more moving. If only the film could have been the ending of the TV show, ('The Judgment' is not really all that good, despite its historical ratings).

My dream ending for the show is Kimble leaving the courthouse and suddenly finding himself surrounded by the women who fell in love with him in all his travels, and then running down the street to escape from them! Actually, I think it would have been nice if he found Vera Miles and the boy from 'Fear in Desert City' waiting for him. That would have been the most poetic ending of all. I wonder what Goldsmith might have written for that.


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Which Fugitive's woman do you prefer ? edestci
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