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5 items from 2012


Whitney Houston, Jennie Rivera and more of 2012's Gone but Not Forgotten

31 December 2012 11:00 AM, PST | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

As a new year dawns, a tribute to those we've lost in the year now ending is merited ... and in 2012, those sad milestones have encompassed some of the most popular personalities in television history.

Andy Griffith: The actor-producer who put Mayberry on the map forever will be remembered as one of television's most genial personalities, also extending to his run as wily lawyer Matlock.

Dick Clark: The number of music stars who owe at least part of their success to the "American Bandstand" maestro is incalculable. Thanks to him, people also enjoy "New Year's Rockin' Eve," receive American Music Awards and have a greater appreciation of bloopers. Here's a "so long" salute to you, Dick.

Larry Hagman: The truly unfortunate irony of the veteran actor's recent death is that he was just starting his second round of "Dallas" success as master schemer J.R. Ewing. He'll also »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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William Windom obituary

23 August 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

American TV and film actor whose repertoire ran from Shakespeare to Star Trek

It may well be that the American actor William Windom, who has died aged 88 of congestive heart failure, appeared as a guest star in more TV series than anyone else in the history of the medium. While quantity is not necessarily an adjunct of quality, Windom made it so.

The character actor's career on television spanned seven decades, from his debut as a fiery Tybalt in a Philco Television Playhouse production of Romeo and Juliet (1949) to an episode of Star Trek: New Voyages (2004) in which he recreated the role of the unbalanced Commodore Matt Decker. Decker was first seen in one of the series's best chapters, The Doomsday Machine (1967), and it was enough to sanctify Windom in the eyes of Trekkies. The role had been written for Robert Ryan, but Windom's powerful portrayal made any possible comparisons redundant. »

- Ronald Bergan

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William Windom obituary

23 August 2012 4:06 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

American TV and film actor whose repertoire ran from Shakespeare to Star Trek

It may well be that the American actor William Windom, who has died aged 88 of congestive heart failure, appeared as a guest star in more TV series than anyone else in the history of the medium. While quantity is not necessarily an adjunct of quality, Windom made it so.

The character actor's career on television spanned seven decades, from his debut as a fiery Tybalt in a Philco Television Playhouse production of Romeo and Juliet (1949) to an episode of Star Trek: New Voyages (2004) in which he recreated the role of the unbalanced Commodore Matt Decker. Decker was first seen in one of the series's best chapters, The Doomsday Machine (1967), and it was enough to sanctify Windom in the eyes of Trekkies. The role had been written for Robert Ryan, but Windom's powerful portrayal made any possible comparisons redundant. »

- Ronald Bergan

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Emmy Winner William Windom Dead at 88

19 August 2012 5:14 PM, PDT | E! Online | See recent E! Online news »

Rest in peace, William Windom. The television actor, who received an Emmy Award for his work in My World and Welcome to It and is well-known for his roles on Star Trek and Murder, She Wrote, died in his California home from congestive heart failure on Thursday, according to the New York Times. Windom was 88. During his early years, Windom joined the army and served as a paratrooper in World War II. He later attended the University of Kentucky, among several other higher-education institutions, and decided to pursue acting. Windom also appeared on episodes of The Twilight Zone and the '60s comedy series The Farmer's Daughter, where he played a Minnesota congressman, a position served »

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Davy Jones, Monkee and teenage heart-throb – a life in clips

29 February 2012 12:04 PM, PST | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

Former Monkee Davy Jones, who has died of a heart attack aged 66, enjoyed a long career as a TV and radio star. Here are some clips to remember him by

Davy Jones always had a penchant for entertaining, but it was his mother's death from emphysema in 1960 that prompted him to drop out of school and become, of all things, a jockey.

Z Cars

Only 14 at the time, the diminutive Jones apprenticed under jockey Basil Foster, who was the first to recognize the boy's charm and talent. Foster encouraged Jones to pursue acting and before long he had landed parts on the British soap Coronation Street as well as BBC's Z Cars. He makes his appearance in this Z Cars clip at about the 50-second mark.

Oliver!

These appearances were followed by a big part in the London and American production of Oliver!, which itself was featured on The Ed Sullivan Show »

- Brian Braiker

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5 items from 2012


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