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(1963–1966)

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Former Miss America Mary Ann Mobley Dies at 77

Former Miss America Mary Ann Mobley Dies at 77
Mary Ann Mobley died Tuesday at her home in Beverly Hills. She was 77. The Mississippi native was crowned the state's first Miss America in 1959. She capitalized on her success in the pageantry world by making a name for herself as an actress in Hollywood. Mobley made her TV debut on Burke's Law in 1963. She later appeared in theatrical productions of Guys and Dolls and the King and I. Mobley shared the screen with Elvis Presley twice in 1965, in Girl Happy and Harum Scarum. Though she was successful on the big screen, Mobley continued to work on the small screen, too. She was a regular on Circus with the Stars, and she appeared in Diff'rent Strokes, Falcon Crest, Fantasy Island and Love Boat. Some of her...
See full article at E! Online »

Rip Screenwriter and Reel Geezer Lorenzo Semple, Jr. (Videos)

Screenwriter Lorenzo Semple,. Jr. died Friday of natural causes at his Los Angeles home. He had just turned 91 the day before.  Born Lorenzo Semple III in Westchester, New York, the writer's uncle was playwright Philip Barry ("The Philadelphia Story"). Semple studied at Yale before driving an ambulance in the Mideast during World War II, earning the Croix de Guerre, followed by a stint in the Army, emerging with a Bronze Star.  He started out his career writing short stories for the Saturday Evening Post and Time, and after finishing his degree in drama at Columbia, he wrote several plays, several of which were mounted and acquired by Hollywood.  He was mentored by TV producer Aaron Spelling ("Burke's Law"). And he created the original campy "Batman" TV series starring Adam West, which spawned a 1966 movie which he also wrote.  Semple moved to Hollywood during "Batman," where he wrote screenplays (along with
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

'Friends' Joey, 'How I Met Your Mother's' Barney and more great TV bachelors

Bentley Gregg (John Forsythe, "Bachelor Father," 1957-62, CBS/NBC/ABC): Though he had plenty of female friends, attorney Gregg also was responsible enough to raise his niece.

Bill Davis (Brian Keith, "Family Affair," CBS, 1966-71): Bringing up his orphaned nieces and nephew usually didn't cramp the romantic life of civil engineer Davis.

Amos Burke (Gene Barry, "Burke's Law" and "Amos Burke, Secret Agent," ABC, 1963-66): Crime solver Burke lived the high life very visibly, which was of natural appeal to many women. ("Burke's Law," with Barry again, had a mid-'90s revival on CBS.)

Tom Corbett (Bill Bixby, "The Courtship of Eddie's Father," ABC, 1969-72): With much input from his young son, widower Corbett often played the game of love.

Remington Steele (Pierce Brosnan, "Remington Steele," NBC, 1982-87): Even if in the end he was a one-woman man -- that woman being detective agency boss
See full article at Zap2It - From Inside the Box »

"Honey West: The Complete Series" DVD Release

  • CinemaRetro
Retro-active: The Best From Cinema Retro's Arcives

As someone who has written extensively about the spy craze of the 1960s, I'm ashamed to admit I'd never seen an episode of Honey West. The series premiered in 1965 but lasted a mere one season, a casualty of high ratings from its time slot rival Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C. Thus, I had no preconceived notions when Vci's complete series arrived for review. The 4 DVD set consists of all thirty episodes. I have not watched all of them, but I've seen enough to get a general taste of the show- and I love it. It's been said that Honey West was the first kick-ass female action hero on TV, but in fact, that honor probably goes to the character of Cathy Gale on The Avengers. Nevertheless, Honey had great influence despite the brevity of her series. In fact, its amazing how loyal
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Elaine Stewart, 'Brigadoon' Star, Dies At 81 Years Old

Elaine Stewart, 'Brigadoon' Star, Dies At 81 Years Old
Los Angeles — Elaine Stewart, a leading lady in a series of films in the 1950s, including "Brigadoon," and star of the 1970s game shows "Gambit" and "High Rollers," has died. She was 81.

Her agent Fred Wostbrock told the Los Angeles Times that Stewart died Monday at her home in Beverly Hills after a long illness.

Stewart was born Elsy Steinberg. Her first starring role came in the 1953 crime drama "Code Two." She also appeared in the films "The Adventures of Hajji Baba," "The Tattered Dress" and "Night Passage."

In the 1960s, she was in several TV shows including "Bat Masterson," "Burke's Law" and "Perry Mason."

Stewart is survived by her husband, the game show producer Merrill Heatter, and two children.
See full article at Huffington Post »

Actress Satana Dies

  • WENN
Actress Satana Dies
Actress Tura Satana has died of heart failure at the age of 72.

The star passed away in Reno, Nevada on Friday night, her longtime manager, Siouxzan Perry, tells the New York Times.

Born in 1938, Satana began her career as a teenage model before moving into acting.

She appeared in several TV shows, including Burke's Law, The Greatest Show On Earth, Hawaiian Eye, and The Man From U.N.C.L.E..

The beauty landed her first big screen role in 1963's Irma La Douce, and became most well-known for her turn in Russ Meyer’s 1965 film Faster, Pussycat! Kill! Kill!.

Satana once famously dated Elvis Presley - but turned down a proposal from the musician. She went on to wed a retired Los Angeles police officer in 1981. He died in 2000.

In more recent years, she appeared in 2008's Sugar Boxx and voiced a character in 2009's The Haunted World of El Superbeasto.

Satana is survived by two daughters from a previous relationship.

Jill Haworth obituary

Actor best known for her roles in Exodus and the Broadway musical Cabaret

The producer-director Otto Preminger had an eye for blue-eyed blondes, casting two complete unknowns, the 19-year-old Jean Seberg in Saint Joan (1957) and the 15-year-old Jill Haworth in Exodus (1960), with mixed results. In Preminger's rambling, all-things-to-all-people saga about the birth of Israel, Haworth, who has died aged 65, played Karen Hansen, a young Danish-Jewish girl searching for her father, from whom she was separated during the second world war. She falls in love with a radical Zionist (Sal Mineo), but is killed during a raid and buried in the same grave as an Arab, a symbol of reconciliation between the two peoples. Despite a phoney accent and the fact that she had never acted previously, Haworth was cute and touching in the significant role.

She then appeared in two more of Preminger's overstretched epics on huge subjects: The Cardinal
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Rue McClanahan obituary

American actor best known as the man-hungry Blanche in The Golden Girls

As the insecure, man-hungry widow Blanche Devereaux, the actor Rue McClanahan, who has died aged 76, was the linchpin of the humour in the hugely successful Us television sitcom The Golden Girls, the tale of four women living together in Miami, Florida. Blanche, a southern belle, was the foil for the New York acerbity of her Italian-American friend Dorothy (Bea Arthur) and Dorothy's mother Sophia (Estelle Getty), but also played brilliantly against the middle American naivety of Betty White's Rose. When Rose wondered whether it was possible to love two men at one time, Blanche's reply was: "Set the scene. Have we been drinking?"

The Golden Girls debuted in 1985 and went straight to the top of the ratings. It ran until 1992 and resulted in three spin-offs along with a deservedly short-lived British version, Brighton Belles (1993). It was
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

'Golden Girl' Rue McClanahan dies

'Golden Girl' Rue McClanahan dies
Rue McClanahan, the veteran actress who won an Emmy for playing the saucy Southern belle Blanche Devereaux on "The Golden Girls," died early Thursday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital of a stroke. She was 76.

She had undergone treatment for breast cancer in 1997 and later lectured to cancer support groups on "aging gracefully." She had heart bypass surgery last year.

"Golden Girls" ran from 1985-92 on NBC and was a hit from the beginning, starting off at No. 1 in the Nielsens. The foursome -- which also included Bea Arthur, Betty White and Estelle Getty -- delighted audiences.

McClanahan earned four Emmy noms for "Golden Girls," winning in 1987. She also was nominated for three Golden Globes for her performance as the sex-crazed Blanche.

She also played Blanche in three other series: one episode each of "Nurses" and "Empty Nest" -- both of which preceded "Golden Girls" -- and as a regular on "The Golden Palace,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

'Davy Crockett' star Fess Parker dies

'Davy Crockett' star Fess Parker dies
Fess Parker, who starred as the racoon-skinned Davy Crockett in "Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier," becoming a lifelong star to young Baby Boomers, has died of natural causes, according to reports. He was 85.

Parker also delighted young viewers with his performances in "Old Yeller" and "Daniel Boone." In more recent years, he attained a second stardom as a winery owner of the sprawling Doubletree resort along beachfront Santa Barbara, Calif., and the Wine Country Inn & Spa in Los Olivos, Calif.

He was hugely popular among kids in the late 1950s, starring in such Disney films as "The Great Locomotive Chase," "Westward Ho the Wagons!" and "The Light in the Forest." He was named a Disney legend in 1991.

His appeal peaked with the nationwide Davy Crockett craze as little tykes bought the coon-skinned caps and belted out the popular refrains of "Davy Crockett." He went on to star in
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Farrah Fawcett: Oscars director apologises for 'in memoriam' omission

Academy director Bruce Davis concedes decision may have caused upset, but maintains the actor's best work was on TV

The man in charge of the "in memoriam" sequence at Sunday night's Oscars has apologised for the hurt caused to friends and family of Farrah Fawcett by the exclusion of the actor. However, Bruce Davis said he stood by the decision, which was taken on the grounds that Fawcett's notable work had taken place mainly on the TV, rather than in movies.

"There's nothing you can say to people, particularly to family members, within a day or two of the show that helps at all," said Davis, the executive director of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. "They tend to be surprised and hurt, and we understand that and we're sorry for it."

Fawcett's family issued a statement following the snub declaring they were "deeply saddened" and "bereft with
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Farrah Fawcett Oscars 'In Memoriam' Omission Was Intentional

'In every category, you're going to miss some wonderful people,' Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences executive director says.

By Larry Carroll

Farrah Fawcett

Photo: Keystone/ Getty Images

Two days after fans of Farrah Fawcett began complaining that the late "Charlie's Angels" star had been overlooked by the Oscars, an Academy Awards representative is speaking for the first time about the omission, and revealing that it was done on purpose.

Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences executive director Bruce Davis, speaking on behalf of the committee who assembles the Oscar's yearly "In Memoriam" segment, told The Associated Press that it was a difficult decision to omit Fawcett and that they expected some controversy. "[The committee] was kind of figuring that probably the Farrah Fawcett and Gene Barry omissions would be the ones we'd get the most comments on," Davis said, also naming the veteran actor whose 1963-66 series "Burke's Law
See full article at MTV Music News »

Gene Barry obituary

Elegant star of Us TV series from the 1950s onwards

For any regular television viewer in the 1960s and 70s, the elegant actor Gene Barry, who has died aged 90, was inescapable. Most prominent was his portrayal of the Los Angeles police captain Amos Burke in 81 episodes of Burke's Law (1963-66). No ordinary cop, Burke was an immaculately dressed, jet-setting millionaire bachelor who left his Beverly Hills mansion in a chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce to investigate a murder. Barry as Burke, a wisecracking, sophisticated ladies' man, was the nearest thing on TV to Cary Grant.

Each episode – bursting with Hollywood guest stars, one of whom was revealed as a murderer – allowed Burke to deliver an aphorism such as "never drink martinis with beautiful suspects: Burke's Law", or "never ask a question unless you already know the answer. Burke's Law".

Before playing Burke, Barry had triumphed in the western TV series Bat Masterson (1958-
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Gene Barry obituary

Elegant star of Us TV series from the 1950s onwards

For any regular television viewer in the 1960s and 70s, the elegant actor Gene Barry, who has died aged 90, was inescapable. Most prominent was his portrayal of the Los Angeles police captain Amos Burke in 81 episodes of Burke's Law (1963-66). No ordinary cop, Burke was an immaculately dressed, jet-setting millionaire bachelor who left his Beverly Hills mansion in a chauffeur-driven Rolls-Royce to investigate a murder. Barry as Burke, a wisecracking, sophisticated ladies' man, was the nearest thing on TV to Cary Grant.

Each episode – bursting with Hollywood guest stars, one of whom was revealed as a murderer – allowed Burke to deliver an aphorism such as "never drink martinis with beautiful suspects: Burke's Law", or "never ask a question unless you already know the answer. Burke's Law".

Before playing Burke, Barry had triumphed in the western TV series Bat Masterson (1958-
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

TV and Stage Actor Gene Barry Dies

  • The Wrap
TV and Stage Actor Gene Barry Dies
Elegant, impeccably dressed, Gene Barry, who died on Wednesday, always brought a touch of class to his many television and stage roles. The veteran actor died of unknown causes at a Los Angeles retirement home, according to his son, Fredric James Barry. He was 90.

In a career that spanned over six decades, Barry came to fame as the star of the television series "Bat Masterson" (1958-61) and "Burke's Law" (1963-65) and later originated the role of Georges on Bro...
See full article at The Wrap »

TV star Gene Barry passes away at 90

  • Aol TV.
TV star Gene Barry passes away at 90
"It's Burke's Law." That was the opening tag for one of three successful TV series that starred Gene Barry, one of the classiest actors to appear on screen. On Wednesday, TV star Gene Barry died at at 90 of undetermined causes. He was living in an L.A. rest home, but I will remember Gene Barry as the man who made Burke's Law, Bat Masterson and The Name of the Game memorable TV entertainment.

Barry was also well-known as the original star of the 1953 version of The War of the Worlds, and when Steven Spielberg remade the film in 2005 with Tom Cruise, he gave Gene a quick cameo. In addition to being a versatile leading man -- capable of playing a bad guy, a bon vivant, cops, spies, gentlemen, gunslingers, and magazine publishers -- Gene Barry also was a song and dance man. In 1984, he was one of the toasts of
See full article at Aol TV. »

Gene Barry Dead At Age 90; Played Bat Masterson On T.V.

  • CinemaRetro
Barry played the title role in the Bat Masterson TV series.

Actor Gene Barry has died at age 90. He was best known for starring in three popular TV series in the 1950s and 1960s: Bat Masterson, Burke's Law and The Name of the Game. He also starred in the feature film War of the Worlds and made a cameo appearance in Steven Spielberg's recent remake. Click here for more
See full article at CinemaRetro »

Actor Barry Dies

  • WENN
Actor Barry Dies
Actor Gene Barry has died at the age of 90.

The star passed away of unknown causes on Wednesday in a care home in Woodland Hills, California.

Barry appeared in several Broadway plays and musicals before starring in the sci-fi hit Invaders From Mars in 1953 and 1955's Soldier of Fortune with Clark Gable.

He also appeared in the War of the Worlds in 1953 and made a cameo in the 2005 remake.

But he was best known for his small-screen work, including his roles on Bat Masterson, Burke's Law, and The Name of the Game.

He is survived by his three children, Michael, Fredric and Elizabeth.

Ricardo Montalban dies at 88

Ricardo Montalban dies at 88
Ricardo Montalban, who became a household name for his performance as the wish-granting Mr. Roarke on "Fantasy Island," died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. The actor was 88.

Montalban's death was announced at a meeting of the city council by president Eric Garcetti, who represents the district where the actor lived. Garcetti did not give a cause of death.

Although he was best known as the charming Roarke on ABC's 1978-84 hit series, Montalban was also a gifted character actor who won an Emmy for his portrayal of a Sioux chief in the miniseries "How the West Was Won."

Montalban's suave manner and patriarchal dignity became his trademarks, and for a period in his late career, he served as the TV pitchman for Chrysler. His dignified intonation -- "rich Corinthian leather" with his regal rolling of the "R's" -- caught viewers' favor and was widely repeated.

Montalban could also play the most dastardly villains,
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006

Aaron Spelling: 1923-2006
Aaron Spelling, the amazingly prolific television producer whose hits ranged from Charlie's Angels to 7th Heaven, died Friday after suffering a stroke last Sunday; he was 83. Spelling passed away at his Los Angeles home, where he had been resting since his stroke on June 18, for which he was briefly hospitalized. Born in Dallas, Spelling was the fourth son of immigrant Jews and grew up in poverty on the self-proclaimed "wrong side of the tracks," ostracized in his early years because of his religion and orthodox parents. After serving in World War II, he enrolled and later graduated from Southern Methodist University, quickly moving to Hollywood, where he worked briefly as a bit-player actor (he was a gas station attendant in an episode of I Love Lucy) and married the actress Carolyn Jones (later of The Addams Family fame) in 1953; they later divorced in 1964. Spelling found greater success as a writer for such shows as Playhouse 90, and soon was hired as a producer by Dick Powell for Four Star Productions, and his first hit was the crime drama Burke's Law, starring Gene Barry. After Powell passed away, Spelling teamed with actor-producer Danny Thomas, with whom he scored a major hit in The Mod Squad in 1969. At the dawn of the 70s, Spelling signed an exclusive contract with ABC, a network his programming would come to dominate for the next decade; former ABC programming chief Leonard Goldberg joined him as a producing partner in 1972. The two produced innumerable television films (including The Boy in the Bubble, starring heartthrob John Travolta) before striking series gold with action shows SWAT, Starsky & Hutch and The Rookies, as well as the acclaimed Emmy-winning drama Family. It was a trio of huge hits, however, that cemented Spelling's fame and success: the Saturday night revolving guest-cast shows The Love Boat and Fantasy Island, and the phenomenally popular Charlie's Angels, which launched the careers of Farrah Fawcett and Jaclyn Smith (among others) and single-handedly invented "jiggle television," shows featuring beautiful women in revealing clothing. Other shows followed -- Hart to Hart, Hotel, Vega$, and TJ Hooker among them -- before Spelling struck gold again in the 80s with Dynasty, a pop-culture phenomenon that challenged the popular soap Dallas and for one season was the number one show in the country. Oftentimes, his Los Angeles mansion, which he bought in 1983 with second wife Candy Spelling and boasted 123 rooms, a bowling alley, swimming pool, gymnasium, tennis court, screening room and four 2-car garages, was compared to the excesses of Dynasty's fictional denizens. When the quintessential 80s show was cancelled, Spelling found himself for the first time without a series on the air, which he said caused him to fall into a major depression. Nevertheless, after a year Spelling was back, this time with the teen soap Beverly Hills 90210, which helped launch the fledgling Fox network as well as his daughter Tori Spelling's acting career, a circumstance she would later affectionately spoof in her own comedy series, So NoTORIous. Spinoff Melrose Place quickly followed, as well as a number of other California-set series that were less memorable. Still, even into the new century, Spelling found himself with two hits on the WB network: the witchy fantasy Charmed, which ended only last season, and religious family drama 7th Heaven, which after a brief cancellation earlier this year was resurrected by the new CW network for the upcoming fall season. Though derided for his shows' superficiality, Spelling preferred to call his hits "mind candy," and his success and endurability was also marked by acclaimed programming that included the TV films The Best Little Girl in the World and the Emmy-winning AIDS drama And the Band Played On. Spelling also produced a number of feature films, including Soapdish, California Split, and Mr. Mom. Spelling is survived by his wife Candy, daughter Tori, and son Randy Spelling. --Mark Englehart, IMDb staff
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