Los Angeles is where Sgt. Nick Anderson and his fellow officers work to keep the streets safe. After the arrest of the accused, attorney John Egan plans their defense while the prosecution is lead by Jerry Miller.
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1  
1964   1963  
Nominated for 4 Primetime Emmys. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete series cast summary:
...
 Det. Sgt. Nick Anderson (30 episodes, 1963-1964)
...
 John Egan (30 episodes, 1963-1964)
...
 Det. Sgt. Dan Kirby (30 episodes, 1963-1964)
...
 Deputy DA Jerry Miller / ... (29 episodes, 1963-1964)
Don Galloway ...
 Mitchell Harris (26 episodes, 1963-1964)
...
 Jake Shakespeare / ... (24 episodes, 1963-1964)
...
 Assistant Deputy District Attorney Barry Pine / ... (18 episodes, 1963-1964)
Noah Keen ...
 Det. Lt. Bone / ... (17 episodes, 1963-1964)
Joanne Miya ...
 Janet Okada (13 episodes, 1963-1964)
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Storyline

Los Angeles is where Sgt. Nick Anderson and his fellow officers work to keep the streets safe. After the arrest of the accused, attorney John Egan plans their defense while the prosecution is lead by Jerry Miller.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

courtroom | See All (1) »

Genres:

Crime | Drama

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Details

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Language:

Release Date:

15 September 1963 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Arresto y juicio  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

(30 episodes)

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.33 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The Rifleman (1958) was scheduled for a sixth season in 1963 when Chuck Connors said he felt that five years in one series was enough. He was considered a hot property at the time due to its success. "Eager for a change," he wanted to break out of the western mold. Connors signed a lucrative seven-year deal with Universal/Revue Studios that gave him profit participation and allowed him to do at least one feature film a year. "Arrest & Trial" was the first project he committed to under his new contract. Originally slated to play Sgt. Anderson, the Ben Gazzara part, Connors lobbied for and received the part of John Egan, a slick, top-flight criminal defense attorney. Gazzara, on the other hand, had a number of impressive Broadway plays and Hollywood films to his credit but had resisted doing a TV series because, in those days, it could damage an actor's chances to appear on the big screen. However, Gazzara said that Broadway hadn't made him rich and the film offers were not exactly rolling in. So, he signed for "Arrest & Trial" for the financial security and exposure. Both actors were reportedly paid $7,500 a week and Gazzara, like Connors, enjoyed profit participation. See more »

Connections

Remade as Arrest & Trial (2000) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Intelligent, well-acted 1960s TV legal drama
25 February 2012 | by (US) – See all my reviews

Sometimes melodramatic, but intelligent and very well acted early 1960s U.S. TV series, that obviously served as the inspiration for "Law & Order".

Like "L & O" this is divided into 2 parts; "Arrest" where cop Ben Gazzara tracks down the person seemingly guilty of that week's crime and "Trial" where Chuck Connors defends them.

Having the 2nd half be from the defense point-of-view, not the prosecutor's makes the show different than "Law and Order", and arguably more interesting. It makes blatant how much of the legal system exists in shades of gray.

It's not surprising that Ben Gazzara is very, very good as cop Nick Anderson, making him more complex and interesting than your basic TV detective of the era. What caught me off- guard was that Connors as successful attorney John Egan, just about matches him. Unlike Gazzara, Connors was never taken that seriously as an actor,. But he shows a lot here as a top notch, somewhat cynical lawyer. Beyond the two leads, the guest casts were often very strong as well.

It's partly because these were 90 minutes episodes on TV, so each show runs about 75 minutes of screen time, as opposed to the standard TV drama that runs an hour, which means about 45-60 minutes of actual story. With the extra time, the writers fleshed out the characters, both regulars and guests, much more fully than on most non-serialized dramas.

So even if there are plot or logic holes (like charging a man with 1st degree murder, instead of a much more logical 2nd degree or manslaughter, so the trial can be about the issue of "intent" ) it feels more like you're watching a solid, well acted B-film each episode, instead of an early TV series. And the series has a nice mix of dark edginess and humanism.

Yes, the score can be painfully over-the-top, and some of the resolutions are too neat, but I'd still say this holds up favorably to a lot of the modern U.S. character cop and/or lawyer shows of today.


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