L'eclisse
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L'Eclisse (1962) More at IMDbPro »L'eclisse (original title)


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8 items from 2011


10 of the best films set in Rome

13 July 2011 2:41 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

John Hooper selects 10 of his favourite Rome-based films from Hepburn in Roman Holiday to Fellini's La Dolce Vita

• As featured in our Rome city guide

Roman Holiday, William Wyler, 1953

Insulated from the commotion of Roman life, Via Margutta is a cobbled street near the Spanish Steps, draped in ivy and lined nowadays with art galleries, restaurants and boutiques. It was home to Federico Fellini and Truman Capote. And at number 51, Crown Princess Ann (Audrey Hepburn) began her fleeting love affair with an American foreign correspondent, Joe Bradley (Gregory Peck) in the enchanting, if improbable, comedy that shot Hepburn to fame and forever welded Vespas to Rome in the popular imagination. "You have my permission to withdraw..." slurs Hepburn, unaware she has previously been sedated, as she lets her skirt slip to the floor. "Why, thank you very much," replies the gentlemanly Peck and leaves her to sleep alone. It »

- John Hooper

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David Robert Mitchell's Top 15 Films of All Time

12 July 2011 5:55 PM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Have you ever wondered what are the films that inspire the next generation of visionary filmmakers? As part of our monthly Ioncinephile profile (read here), we ask the filmmaker the incredibly arduous task of identifying their top ten list of favorite films. This month we get not ten, but 15 and styled in a countdown manner from David Robert Mitchell, the filmmaker behind The Myth of the American Sleepover. This is what he said about the task at hand.  "My Top Fifteen Favorite Movies at the Moment (7/10/2011). Breaking this down to 10 movies sucks. It's impossible. I'm cheating and including 15. This list is still missing so many things that are important to me and the order is a jumbled mess. Oh well. Here's my top 15 at this moment in time. Tomorrow it might be a bit different. My number 32 film might just be my number 5." 15. L'Eclisse - Michelangelo Antonioni (1962) "Monica Vitti has »

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The death of the film trilogy

25 April 2011 8:33 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Some of the finest directors have produced masterful triptychs. But do we really need a fourth Pirates of the Caribbean?

It currently seems the only three that interests Hollywood relates to dimensionality. The reverence once extended to the film trilogy is fast diminishing, and although third instalments are due for Transformers, Ong-Bak, Paranormal Activity, Alvin and the Chipmunks, Men in Black, Madagascar, Batman and Iron Man, only the first two have been announced as series finales.

Indeed, with Scre4m, Pirates of the Caribbean 4: On Stranger Tides and Spy Kids 4: All the Time in the World soon to be followed by fourth entries in the Austin Powers, Mission: Impossible, Underworld and Bourne franchises, the trilogy could soon go the way of the 2D movie, as the synergy-obsessed suits controlling the multi-media conglomerates now owning the major studios adhere to the maxim that familiarity breeds both content and profit. »

- David Parkinson

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Barbican Film: Michelangelo Antonioni Directorspective

15 February 2011 11:31 PM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

The highlight of the Barbican’s Michelangelo Antonioni Directorspective have arguably been the screenings of L’avventura (1960) and La notte (1961), the first two films of what has been described by critic Philip French as the “The Antonioni Walk,” an unofficial, loose trilogy of modernist films that explore the existential crisis of rich, beautiful characters who are bored with their lives.

On the 20 February at 4.00pm the Barbican will screen the final chapter in the trilogy, L’eclisse (1964). These three films, although often termed as a trilogy, are not linked by plot but rather by the theme of the banality and pointlessness of human existence. This is typical of Antonioni, who described his films as follows:

“I never discuss the plots of my films. I never release a synopsis before I begin shooting. How could I? Until the film is edited, I have no idea myself what it will be about. »

- Daniel Green

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Antonioni Project – review

2 February 2011 4:01 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Barbican, London

Ivo van Hove's Roman Tragedies, seen at the Barbican in 2009, was an invigorating experience using technology, video and live performance to make you see and engage with Shakespeare in an entirely different way. It's hard to muster the same enthusiasm for his latest piece, based on the scripts for a trilogy of movies – L'Avventura, La Notte and L'Eclisse – made by Michelangelo Antonioni in the early 1960s. The films explore the relationships of several couples for whom sex is easy, but emotional intimacy impossible.

It is impressively executed and not without interest, but slightly arid – as if the creative process has become infected by the emotional sickness of its protagonists, whose stories overlap at a smart party where people bemoan lost youth and fall into bed with each other.

Prior to that, we see them lost in the existential void of a vast blue-screen movie set. It offers »

- Lyn Gardner

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"Antonioni Project," Figgis @ Eno, DVDs and More

2 February 2011 6:01 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Updated through 2/2.

"Ivo van Hove's Roman Tragedies was one of the theatrical highlights of 2009," writes Maxie Szalwinska for the Guardian. "A six-hour mash-up of Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra, the Belgian director's inspired show used sharp-suited actors and live video to create something akin to Shakespeare crossed with 24-hour rolling news… Now Van Hove is back – with Antonioni Project, a work that does a similar trick with three 1960s films by the legendary Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni: L'Avventura, La Notte and L'Eclisse. 'Antonioni Project is not an adaptation of the movies,' says Van Hove, sitting on an orange plastic chair in a bar in Antwerp. 'That wouldn't make sense. It's an adaptation of the scripts. You don't make an adaptation of the Hamlet you saw – you make an adaptation of the script.'" »

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Tonino Guerra to Receive Writers Guild's Jean Renoir Screenwriting Award

24 January 2011 10:26 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Writers Guild of America West will give Italian Tonino Guerra the Jean Renoir Award for Screenwriting Achievement by an international writer (given on an occasional basis). Guerra has written over 100 screenplays and is, states the Guild's Howard Rodman: “by any standard one of the great writers of our times. His medium is the screenplay...Guerra's work is the brave and moral thread that runs through the fabric of modernist cinema. He is a breathtaking poet, a generous collaborator, and is possessed of the largest heart." His films include L'avventura, La notte, L'eclisseRed DesertBlow-Up, and Zabriskie Point for Antonioni; Amarcord for Fellini; Nostalghia for Tarkovsky; Landscapes in the Mist for Angelopoulos; and Exquisite Corpses for Rosi. At the WGA Awards ceremony on February 5, Guerra, who turns 91 this March, will be celebrated along with »

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Antonioni Project: the great big movie mash-up

9 January 2011 4:00 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Three of Michelangelo Antonioni's finest films have been turned into a single stage play – complete with mind-boggling special effects. Maxie Szalwinska meets the Belgian director behind the show

Ivo van Hove's Roman Tragedies was one of the theatrical highlights of 2009. A six-hour mash-up of Coriolanus, Julius Caesar and Antony and Cleopatra, the Belgian director's inspired show used sharp-suited actors and live video to create something akin to Shakespeare crossed with 24-hour rolling news. The Guardian's Lyn Gardner said the production, performed at the Barbican, made it seem "as if Shakespeare is not only our contemporary but only finished writing the plays this morning".

Now Van Hove is back – with Antonioni Project, a work that does a similar trick with three 1960s films by the legendary Italian director Michelangelo Antonioni: L'Avventura, La Notte and L'Eclisse. "Antonioni Project is not an adaptation of the movies," says Van Hove, sitting »

- Maxie Szalwinska

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8 items from 2011


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