To Kill a Mockingbird (1962) - News Poster

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Greenlit: Ryan Murphy Makes Waves At Netflix + More Industry Casting Outlook

Greenlit means a project is officially a go, so all you have to do is follow these leads to stay up to date. You never know where you’ll find an opportunity to land an audition! “To Kill a Mockingbird” Though the upcoming stage adaptation of Harper Lee’s “To Kill a Mockingbird,” written by none other than Aaron Sorkin, was announced months ago, the production moved forward in a big way this past week, when Broadway was abuzz with the news Jeff Daniels had been cast in the lead role of Atticus Finch, alongside Celia Keenan-Bolger as Scout. The casting decision reunites Daniels and Sorkin, who starred in and wrote HBO’s late “The Newsroom,” respectively. While a lot of the featured cast, which includes Will Pullen, Gideon Glick, and Latanya Richardson Jackson, has already been announced, the Scott Rudin and Lincoln Center Theater production has got Daniel Swee
See full article at Backstage »

Reg E. Cathey, Emmy-Winning ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

  • Indiewire
Reg E. Cathey, Emmy-Winning ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Reg E. Cathey, who was best known for playing Freddy on “House of Cards,” has died at age 59. The news first announced by “The Wire” creator David Simon, who called Cathey “not only a fine, masterful actor — but simply one of the most delightful human beings with whom I ever shared some long days on set.” Netflix has since confirmed the news to IndieWire.

“On wit alone, he could double any man over and leave him thinking. Reg, your memory is a great blessing,” Simon added of his collaborator, who appeared in 23 episodes of the revered HBO drama. Cathey received three consecutive Emmy nominations for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series for his role on “House of Cards,” winning in 2015. A character actor whose career spanned decades, he his silver-screen resume includes everything from “Born on the Fourth of July” and “The Mask” to “What About Bob?” and “Se7en
See full article at Indiewire »

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Actor Reg E. Cathey, who played Freddy on “House of Cards” and appeared in “The Wire,” has died. He was 59 and had reportedly been battling cancer.

Known for his distinctive baritone voice, Reginald Eugene Cathey began acting in 1984 in a television movie called “A Doctor’s Story.” He guest starred on numerous television shows, playing Norman Wilson in seasons four and five of “The Wire” as well as in “Grimm,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” “House of Cards,” and drama “Outcast.”

Cathey won an Emmy for outstanding guest actor in a drama series in 2015 for his work on “House of Cards.” He was previously nominated in 2014 and received another nomination in 2016 for the same role.

“We are heartbroken by the passing of our friend and House of Cards colleague Reg E. Cathey,” said Netflix in a statement. “Reg was the kindest man, the most giving actor, a true gentlemen. Our sympathy
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59

Reg E. Cathey, ‘House of Cards’ and ‘The Wire’ Actor, Dies at 59
Actor Reg E. Cathey, who played Freddy on “House of Cards” and appeared in “The Wire,” has died. He was 59 and had reportedly been battling cancer.

Known for his distinctive baritone voice, Reginald Eugene Cathey began acting in 1984 in a television movie called “A Doctor’s Story.” He guest starred on numerous television shows, playing Norman Wilson in seasons four and five of “The Wire” as well as in “Grimm,” “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit,” “House of Cards,” and drama “Outcast.”

Cathey won an Emmy for outstanding guest actor in a drama series in 2015 for his work on “House of Cards.” He was previously nominated in 2014 and received another nomination in 2016 for the same role.

“We are heartbroken by the passing of our friend and House of Cards colleague Reg E. Cathey,” said Netflix in a statement. “Reg was the kindest man, the most giving actor, a true gentlemen. Our sympathy
See full article at Variety - TV News »

A Horrifying History is Uncovered in Trailer for Sundance Doc ‘Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun?’

Travis Wilkerson’s Did You Wonder Who Fired the Gun? was one of the must-sees on last year’s festival circuit, presented either as a straight-ahead documentary or through a “live cinema” environment wherein the writer-director presented his footage with an in-person voiceover. In whatever form it’s seen, many — from the Village Voice to the New York Times to Sight & Sound to Artforum to the New Yorker — spoke of it as a titanic experience, inciting chills for its exploration of personal history as a microcosm of national shame.

The theatrical version of Wilkerson’s project will be released next month by Grasshopper Film, and thus there is a trailer to mark the occasion. Overlaying the horrifying history with images of southern life and the ultimate image of decency, Atticus Finch, it gives some taste of the journey endured by its creator.

Watch below:

Formally audacious and emotionally powerful: a meditation on conscience and responsibility,
See full article at The Film Stage »

Diane Keaton Stands by Woody Allen: ‘He’s My Friend and I Continue to Believe Him’

Diane Keaton Stands by Woody Allen: ‘He’s My Friend and I Continue to Believe Him’
Diane Keaton is standing by her friend and former collaborator Woody Allen. In recent weeks, numerous actors who have appeared in Allen’s films have said they regret doing so in light of Dylan Farrow’s allegation that the director molested her as a child. Keaton stands by her claim that she believes Allen’s denial of Farrow’s allegation, calling the director her “friend” and linking to a 1992 “60 Minutes” interview in which Allen defends himself.

Read More:Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape

“Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him,” Keaton wrote in a tweet published January 29. “It might be of interest to take a look at the ’60 Minutes’ interview from 1992 and see what you think.”

Woody Allen is my friend and I continue to believe him. It might be of interest to
See full article at Indiewire »

Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape

Alec Baldwin Compares Dylan Farrow to Character From ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Who Lied About Her Rape
Alec Baldwin has been vocal about defending Woody Allen against Dylan Farrow’s sexual molestation allegation, but now he’s gone on to target Farrow specifically in a new series of tweets. Baldwin compares Farrow to Mayella Violet Ewell from “To Kill a Mockingbird.” The character is infamous in Harper Lee’s novel for falsely accusing an African-American man of raping her.

Read More:Alec Baldwin Defends Woody Allen by Asking: ‘What Would It Take for You to Consider He is Telling the Truth?’

“[One] of the most effective things Dylan Farrow has in her arsenal is the ‘persistence of emotion,'” Baldwin tweeted on January 28. “Like Mayella in [“To Kill a Mockingbird”], her tears/exhortations [are] meant [to] shame you [into] belief in her story. But I need more than that before I destroy [someone], regardless of their fame. I need a lot more.”

Baldwin later tweeted that people should unfollow him if they disagree with his defense of Allen.
See full article at Indiewire »

In Cold Blood Detective's Son Reflects on Brutal Case, Relationships with Capote and Harper Lee

In Cold Blood Detective's Son Reflects on Brutal Case, Relationships with Capote and Harper Lee
Paul Dewey was just a boy in 1959 when his detective dad was assigned to investigate the brutal slayings of the Clutter family, who had been found bound and shot to death in their Holcomb, Kansas, farmhouse that November.

The crime — which stunned the tight-knit, trusting community — gained national attention, and eventually infamy, after author Truman Capote traveled there to research it for his 1966 book, In Cold Blood.

Capote’s non-fiction account, a bestseller of both wide acclaim and criticism (for its sometimes murky blend of factual reporting and fictional flourishes), soon became a 1967 film and is now thought of as
See full article at PEOPLE.com »

The Miracle Worker

Anybody that appreciates good theater and good moviemaking will be in awe of Arthur Penn’s marvelous visualization of this tale of a determined woman achieving the impossible — teaching a child that can neither see nor hear. The knock down, drag ’em out scenes between Anne Bancroft and Patty Duke are unique, to say the least.

The Miracle Worker

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1962 / B&W / 1:66 widescreen / 106 min. / Street Date October 31, 2017 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring: Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke, Victor Jory, Inga Swenson, Andrew Prine, Judith Lowry.

Cinematography: Ernesto Caparrós

Film Editor: Aram Avakian

Art Direction: George Jenkins

Original Music: Laurence Rosenthal

Written by William Gibson, from his stage play

Produced by Fred Coe

Directed by Arthur Penn

I can barely believe that Arthur Penn’s obviously superior picture The Miracle Worker wasn’t picked off by Criterion years ago. It’s that good — it ought to
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Alan Pakula: The Whole Damn Thing’ Doc On Way From ‘Always At The Carlyle’ Filmmaker

‘Alan Pakula: The Whole Damn Thing’ Doc On Way From ‘Always At The Carlyle’ Filmmaker
Exclusive: It’s been a long time coming, but finally someone is doing a feature documentary on the life of the great writer/director/producer Alan J. Pakula, the filmmaker whose work included classics To Kill a Mockingbird, All the President’s Men and Sophie’s Choice and who died tragically on the Long Island Expressway in 1998 at only 70 years old. The film has the blessing and participation of his widow Hannah Pakula and the Pakula family. Matthew Miele, whose Always at…
See full article at Deadline »

53rd Chicago International Film Festival Review – Mudbound (2017)

Mudbound, 2017.

Directed by Dee Rees.

Starring Jason Mitchell, Garrett Hedlund, Carey Mulligan, Jason Clarke, Jonathan Banks, Kerry Cahill, Rob Morgan, Kelvin Harrison Jr., Lucy Faust, Henry Frost, Dylan Arnold, David Jensen, Geraldine Singer, and Mary J. Blige.

Synopsis:

Two men return home from World War II to work on a farm in rural Mississippi, where they struggle to deal with racism and adjusting to life after war.

It is undeniably perplexing that a person, regardless of any race, gender, or sexual orientation, can willingly enlist and fight in a war only to come home treated like mud. There are a lot of intertwining stories going on in Mudbound (a film directed by Dee Rees and adapted from the novel by Hillary Jordan that is so timely and powerful, I feel ashamed for not having seen her other breakout work Pariah yet), complete with frequent voiceover narrations from six different characters (admittedly,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Lost in time by Anne-Katrin Titze

Hampton Fancher: "You know, I wrote Blade Runner for Robert Mitchum. The first draft was for him. And Robert Mulligan was going to direct it." Photo: Anne-Katrin Titze

Hampton Fancher, co-screenwriter of Denis Villeneuve's Blade Runner 2049 and Ridley Scott's Blade Runner, told me that he had Robert Mitchum in mind, not Harrison Ford, while writing his first draft of the Blade Runner screenplay when Robert Mulligan (To Kill A Mockingbird) was going to direct the film.

In our conversation at Lincoln Center, Hampton also saw Sam Shepard and Mitchum similarities, that Harry Dean Stanton had a Mitchum-like attitude, and expressed what Quentin Tarantino's Inglourious Basterds and a Wallace Stevens poem can do to him.

Hampton Fancher, subject of Michael Almereyda's recent documentary Escapes and director of The Minus Man (starring Owen Wilson as a serial killer) starts out with coming to grips with evil and beauty.
See full article at eyeforfilm.co.uk »

“To Kill a Mockingbird” Is Still Getting Banned Left and Right

To Kill a Mockingbird is one of those books that are banned on a semi-regular basis. In main, this is because there is some rather unpleasant language in the text. However, it should be noted that the lasting popularity of the book has contributed a great deal as well. After all, no one would bother to ban a book that no one reads, which is not something that can be said about To Kill a Mockingbird when it is a critical component of school curricula throughout the United States and beyond. This time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been removed

To Kill a Mockingbird” Is Still Getting Banned Left and Right
See full article at TVovermind.com »

Marshall review – Chadwick Boseman holds court in powerful civil rights drama

The Black Panther star is outstanding as the real-life hotshot lawyer who defended a black man accused of rape by a white woman in 1941

It’s impossible not to get caught up in this ripping courtroom drama that watchably restages an episode early in the career of the legendary civil rights lawyer Thurgood Marshall, a decade before he worked on landmark segregation cases in the deep south. It’s 1941 and Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) is a hotshot young NAACP attorney, who, like Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird, is defending a black man accused of rape by a white woman.

As legal drama, this is fairly conventional, stuffed to the brim with stirring speeches and a-ha! moments of cross examination theatrics. Sometimes, it feels a bit glib in its focus on the bromance between Thurman and the local white lawyer (Josh Gad) he hires to work with him, though Downton
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

'Black-ish' Star Deon Cole Fuming After 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Ban

  • TMZ
[[tmz:video id="0_3fove6fs"]] "Black-ish" star Deon Cole is Fuming after learning "To Kill a Mockingbird" was banned in the South and makes no bones about it -- it's a blatant attack on African-American history. We got Deon at Lax where we told him about about the ban that went down in Biloxi, Mississippi where the school board there removed the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic from its reading list because the language -- littered with N-words as it was set
See full article at TMZ »

‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Removed From Mississippi School District Curriculum; Twitter Enraged

  • The Wrap
‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Removed From Mississippi School District Curriculum; Twitter Enraged
A Mississippi school district has pulled “To Kill a Mockingbird” from eighth grade classrooms because the novel “makes people uncomfortable.” According to The Sun Herald, the school board did not vote on the move, but rather it was an administrative and department decision made on Wednesday or Thursday. “There were complaints about it. There is some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable, and we can teach the same lesson with other books,” Kenny Holloway, Biloxi School Board vice president told the paper. “It’s still in our library. But they’re going to use another book in the 8th grade course.
See full article at The Wrap »

Marshall – Review

With the movie awards season in full gallop, this week sees the release of a perennial favorite of Academy members: the big screen biography. Now this is a special type of “biopic” in that it doesn’t focus on the entire life (or many years of the life) of the subject, as with films like Ray or The Aviator. Really this new work zeroes in on a year or so of this great person’s career, much as Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln concerned the last few months of the ole’ rail-splitter. Actually this may be closer to John Ford’s terrific Young Mr. Lincoln as it concentrates on a very early case, long before his great fame. And, in a way, this could be considered an “origin” story, much like the initial entries of movie hero franchises (or the first issues of comic book heroes). Yes, this man’s a
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 'Marshall' Director on the Need for Socially Relevant Movies That Aren't "Preachy"

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 'Marshall' Director on the Need for Socially Relevant Movies That Aren't
When the courtroom drama is at its best, it is both a suspenseful mystery story and a thoughtful meditation on the hypocrisies and injustices of society. The courtroom is the gladiatorial arena for the ongoing clash between our highest ideals as exemplified by the law and our petty biases as shown by our attempts to circumvent those ideals. However, the goal of these movies isn’t simply to whine about society’s inadequacies, but to use the stiff bristles of intelligent legal debate to scrub off the tarnish of corruption and reveal the shining American values beneath. To Kill a Mockingbird, Twelve...
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain

Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain
When the Academy invited press for a hard-hat tour of its long-delayed, over-budget Museum of Motion Pictures, we heard Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti say nice things, as did new Academy president John Bailey, museum director Kerry Brougher, new chair of new board of trustees Ron Meyer, and museum committee chair Kathleen Kennedy. Yes, it’s great that, after 90 (!) years of planning, we’re finally getting a 300,000 square-foot Los Angeles movie museum at the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire to celebrate Hollywood past, present, and future.

However, that’s not what we came for. We wanted to know when it’s going to be finished and what it’s going to look like. (Notably, Academy CEO Dawn Hudson, who did much of the heavy lifting and controversy-dodging about museum funding and and construction, was on site but not part of the press conference. And Lacma director Michael Govan showed up late for the construction-site tour.
See full article at Thompson on Hollywood »

Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain

  • Indiewire
Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain
When the Academy invited press for a hard-hat tour of its long-delayed, over-budget Museum of Motion Pictures, we heard Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti say nice things, as did new Academy president John Bailey, museum director Kerry Brougher, new chair of new board of trustees Ron Meyer, and museum committee chair Kathleen Kennedy. Yes, it’s great that, after 90 (!) years of planning, we’re finally getting a 300,000 square-foot Los Angeles movie museum at the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire to celebrate Hollywood past, present, and future.

However, that’s not what we came for. We wanted to know when it’s going to be finished and what it’s going to look like. (Notably, Academy CEO Dawn Hudson, who did much of the heavy lifting and controversy-dodging about museum funding and and construction, was on site but not part of the press conference. And Lacma director Michael Govan showed up late for the construction-site tour.
See full article at Indiewire »
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