To Kill a Mockingbird
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21-40 of 60 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Donovan’s Brain

29 February 2016 5:04 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Blinded by science! And no, it's not a sequel to Donovan's Reef.  Lew Ayres yanks the living brain out of a dying millionaire, plugs it into his mad lab gizmos, and is soon obeying the know-it-all noggin's telepathic commands to scheme and murder. Gene Evans and Nancy Reagan assist in Curt Siodmak's creative, compelling tale of possession by mental remote control. Donovan's Brain Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1953 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 83 min. / Street Date March 22, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Lew Ayres, Gene Evans, Nancy Reagan, Steve Brodie, Tom Powers, Lisa K. Howard, James Anderson, Victor Sutherland, Harlan Warde, John Hamilton. Cinematography Joseph H. Biroc Film Editor Herbert L. Strock Production Design Boris Leven Original Music Eddie Dunstedter Written by Felix Feist, Hugh Brooke from the novel by Curt Siodmak Produced by Allan Dowling, Tom Gries Directed by Felix E. Feist

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Sci-fi and horror »

- Glenn Erickson

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Remembering Harper Lee on Screen, From ‘Mockingbird’ to ‘Capote’

23 February 2016 3:03 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Nearly a decade ago the movies gave us two different, equally well-etched portraits of Nelle Harper Lee, played by Catherine Keener in “Capote” (2006) and by Sandra Bullock in “Infamous” (2007). In both films Lee emerges a picture of sturdy, soft-spoken grace as she accompanies her childhood friend Truman Capote to Kansas, where he is researching his future true-crime masterwork, “In Cold Blood.”

Her role in the process proves far more important than either she or the fluttery, self-absorbed Capote lets on: She is there to grease the wheels of his investigation, to inoculate the locals against their prejudices toward this East Coast outsider, and to nudge open doors that might otherwise be slammed in his face. By standing alongside Truman (and, when necessary, putting him in his place), she builds a bridge between him and the townsfolk — and also, crucially, between him and the audience. Her quiet, homespun goodness vouches for »

- Justin Chang

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Douglas Slocombe, ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark’ Cinematographer, Dies at 103

22 February 2016 12:15 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Douglas Slocombe, the cinematographer for “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” has died. He was 103. According to Afp, his daughter Georgina confirmed his death. Slocombe received Oscar nominations for “Travels With My Aunt” in 1973, “Julia” in 1978 and “Raiders of the Lost Ark” in 1982. He also shot “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “The Great Gatsby,” “The Maids” and “Rollerball,” as well as Ealing comedies including “Kind Hearts and Coronets,” “The Lavender Hill Mob” and “The Man in The White Suit.” Also Read: Harper Lee, 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Author, Dies at 89 “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989) as the last film he worked on. »

- Beatrice Verhoeven and Matt Donnelly

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Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Omen

21 February 2016 4:37 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Our series on remakes continues with a film which is more of a duplication than an actual remake. This week, Cinelinx looks at The Omen (2006).

If you’ve seen the original version of The Omen (1976) and then you watch the remake from 2006, you have to ask “Why did they even bother?” The remake was barely even a remake. It was a shot-for-shot, scene -for-scene copy of the original. Released on the 30th anniversary of the original, it offered absolutely nothing new, except a more modern cast and some mediocre CGI effects. Other than that, this is a completely unnecessary, gratuitous photo-copy of the first version.

About this film Rolling Stone Magazine wrote, “Not since Gus Van Sant inexplicably directed a shot by shot remake of Hitchcock’s Psycho has a thriller been copied with so little point or impact”. Recently, we did a dissection of the Van Sant remake of »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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"To Kill A Mockingbird" Headed To Broadway

21 February 2016 3:17 AM, PST | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Lee Pfeiffer

A new stage adaptation of Harper Lee's literary classic "To Kill a Mockingbird" will be brought to Broadway by producer Scott Rudin. He has hired veteran writer Aaron Sorkin to write the script, which we are told will deviate from the previous, unrelated stage version that adhered closely to the original story and text. Rudin says that the original concept can't be kept in "the original Bubble Wrap" and plans to add scenes that are only alluded to in the film. His instincts better be right because generations of readers have a passionate love for the novel and the 1962 screen version that won an Oscar for Gregory Peck. Readers reacted in shock when the beloved Lee's unpublished novel "Go Set a Watchman" was published last year. The manuscript, which was written before "Mockingbird", presents the character of Atticus Finch (played by Peck in the film as »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Critic's Appraisal: 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' a Screen Masterpiece

20 February 2016 1:17 PM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In 1997, Movieline magazine hosted a 35th anniversary screening of To Kill a Mockingbird, with an amazing array of talent there to discuss the film: actors Gregory Peck, Robert Duvall, Brock Peters, Phillip Alford and Mary Badham (the latter two of whom played the children, Jem and Scout), screenwriter Horton Foote, producer Alan J. Pakula and director Robert Mulligan. One person missing from that reunion was the reclusive author of the novel, Harper Lee, who died Friday at the age of 89. Lee came back into the news last year with the publication of an earlier version of Mockingbird, Go

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- Stephen Farber

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Harper Lee Didn’t Shy Away From Hollywood, Very Involved in 'To Kill a Mockingbird’s' Adaptation

20 February 2016 8:00 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In November 1962, Henry Bumstead traveled from Hollywood to Monroeville, Ala., to meet the author of To Kill a Mockingbird. He’d just been hired as set designer for Universal Studio’s big-screen adaptation of the smash best-seller about a young girl learning about racism in the deep South during the Great Depression, and Bumstead was looking for inspiration. He found it. “Harper Lee was there to meet me,” he wrote in a letter from Alabama to the film’s then-unknown producer, Alan Pakula. “She is the most charming person. She insisted I call her Nell — feel like

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- Benjamin Svetkey

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Best of the Week: BAFTAs, Berlinale, Why 'The Revenant' May Win Best Picture, the Box Office Triumph of 'Deadpool,' More

20 February 2016 6:00 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

The Allure of Conspiracy Theories: On Oliver Stone's 'JFK' and Hulu's '11.22.63'  Arthouse Audit: National Audiences Sample Michael Moore's 'Where to Invade Next,' Avoid Oscar-Nominated 'A War' Berlin Film Festival: Michael Grandage and John Logan Talk 'Genius'  Berlin Review: Emily Dickinson Biopic 'A Quiet Passion' Fails to Stir  Berlin Review: 'Fire at Sea' Offers a Superb Snapshot of the Refugee Crisis Berlin Review: In 'L'Avenir,' Isabelle Huppert Takes Stock of Her Life Berlin Review: 'Strike a Pose' Revisits the Complicated World of Madonna  Berlin Review: Thomas Vinterberg's 'The Commune' Packs an Emotional Punch Berlin Review: The U.S. Is Knee-Deep In Cyber-Terrorism in Alex Gibney's 'Zero Days'  Cohen Media Group Adds Ex-Film Comment Editor to Team Fox Searchlight Production Head Claudia Lewis to Step Down in May Harper Lee, Author of 'To Kill a Mockingbird,' Dead at 89 How Quentin Tarantino »

- TOH!

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Today in Movie Culture: Shia Labeouf's New Art Project, Deadpool's New Sidekick and More

19 February 2016 10:00 PM, PST | Movies.com | See recent Movies.com news »

Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:   Performance Art of the Day: Watch Shia Labeouf's latest performance art project, #Elevate, live while it's happening. Or skim through the video, in which he hangs out in an elevator in Oxford for 24 hours, when it's done.   Superhero Movie Parody of the Day: Watch James Corden pitch various Deadpool sidekick ideas to Ryan Reynolds on The Late Late Show:   Movie Comparisons of the Day: Couch Tomato presents all the reasons that all comic book origin movies are the same:   Vintage Image of the Day: Harper Lee, who has passed away at age 89, with young Mary Badham on the set of To Kill a Mockingbird in 1962:   Oscar...

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- Christopher Campbell

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Rest in Peace Harper Lee (1926-2016)

19 February 2016 5:30 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

The world has lost one of its most important literary and cultural figures with the death of author Nelle Harper Lee. There’s very little to say about the importance of “To Kill a Mockingbird” that hasn’t already been said, both today specifically and in the nearly fifty six years since the novel’s publication. Having attended both high school and college in Georgia, I saw firsthand how much the novel rattled the consciousness of the deep South to its core. It’s still banned and its literary merits are still contested in many places in the South, demonstrating how much weight and resonance the novel still carries—we often turn away from truths that are too ugly to face.

Gregory Peck and Brock Peters in Robert Mulligan's 1962 Film Adaptation of To Kill A Mockingbird

Though her impact in the realm of literature is clear, she also helped »

- Kieran Scarlett

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Harper Lee Dies: ‘To Kill A Mockingbird’ Author Was 89

19 February 2016 3:50 PM, PST | Deadline | See recent Deadline news »

Update with President Obama’s reaction: Harper Lee, an unknown writer from Alabama whose story about racial injustice in the American South would become one of the most acclaimed novels and then movies of all time, has died. The author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning To Kill A Mockingbird was 89. Her death was confirmed by HarperCollins, her publisher, and by the mayor of her hometown of Monroeville, Al. “When Harper Lee sat down to write To Kill a Mockingbird, she wasn’t… »

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Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

19 February 2016 3:34 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

 

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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When Harper Lee Visited the Set of ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’

19 February 2016 2:57 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Harper Lee not only dramatically altered the conversation on race in America with her book “To Kill a Mockingbird,” but she also wholeheartedly approved of the 1962 film adaptation. Jeff Pirtle, the director of NBCUniversal archives and collections, cracked open the studio vault to share stories about Lee’s visit to the set during production. “She was just glowing about everything that had to do with the production,” Pirtle said. “She loved the script…She loved the casting of the two children, who were not professionals. She loved Gregory Peck‘s wardrobe.” Also Read: Harper Lee, 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Author, »

- Joe Otterson

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Harper Lee Didn’t Belong to Us

19 February 2016 1:29 PM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

On Friday morning, famed author Harper Lee died at the age of 89. She passed in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama, where she had lived for nearly her entire life. Lee, of course, wrote the landmark American novel, “To Kill A Mockingbird,” which was published in 1960 and adapted into the classic film of the same name starring Gregory Peck in 1962. Hundreds of remembrances will be published today about Lee and what she meant to literature. They will trace back through her life and recount her early days in Monroeville, her college years at Huntingdon, her relationship with author »

- Jordan Crucchiola

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Harper Lee: ‘Mockingbird’ Actors, Writers Mourn ‘One of America’s Most Beloved Authors’

19 February 2016 12:02 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Hollywood is mourning the loss of Harper Lee, who died on Friday in her hometown of Monroeville, Ala. She was 89. The legendary author of “To Kill a Mockingbird” was remembered by the stars of the classic 1962 film adaptation of her bestselling novel, as well as other actors, screenwriters and authors.

Robert Duvall, who played the mysterious Boo Radley in “To Kill a Mockingbird” — his bigscreen debut — praised the late author’s body of work in a statement.

Harper Lee was a fine person and a wonderful writer,” he said. “‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ was a masterpiece. I was privileged to be in the film version adapted to the screen by her good friend Horton Foote. I only hope that the film did justice to the book. She will be fondly remembered by many.”

Mary Badham, the actress who played Scout, Atticus Finch’s (played by Gregory Peck) daughter in the film, »

- Jacob Bryant

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Hollywood Mourns Harper Lee

19 February 2016 11:58 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

Harper Lee, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird and Go Set a Watchman "died peacefully" on Friday. She was 89. Hollywood stars and directors, authors and publishing houses quickly took to social media to mourn the writer and celebrate one of the most important novels of the 20th century. Mockingbird, a landmark novel bringing to life Southern lawyer Atticus Finch and his daughter Scout, was published in July of 1960 and Watchman was released last July. Robert Duvall, who portrayed Boo Radley in the 1962 film, told The Hollywood Reporter: "Harper Lee was a fine person and a

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- THR Staff

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Twitter Reacts to Harper Lee's Death

19 February 2016 8:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The world just lost one of its most lauded writers. Harper Lee, who is best known for penning the Pulitzer Prize-winning book To Kill a Mockingbird and most recently publishing its long-awaited sequel Go Set a Watchman, passed away at the age of 89 in her Alabama home. As we come to terms with the news and dust off our worn-in copies of To Kill a Mockingbird, fans of the reclusive author are taking to Twitter to voice their thoughts on Lee's passing, as well as stress the impact the Monroeville native had on the literary world. View the story "Twitter »

- Grace Gavilanes, @gracegavilanes

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Twitter Reacts to Harper Lee's Death

19 February 2016 8:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The world just lost one of its most lauded writers. Harper Lee, who is best known for penning the Pulitzer Prize-winning book To Kill a Mockingbird and most recently publishing its long-awaited sequel Go Set a Watchman, passed away at the age of 89 in her Alabama home. As we come to terms with the news and dust off our worn-in copies of To Kill a Mockingbird, fans of the reclusive author are taking to Twitter to voice their thoughts on Lee's passing, as well as stress the impact the Monroeville native had on the literary world. View the story "Twitter »

- Grace Gavilanes, @gracegavilanes

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Twitter Reacts to Harper Lee's Death

19 February 2016 8:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The world just lost one of its most lauded writers. Harper Lee, who is best known for penning the Pulitzer Prize-winning book To Kill a Mockingbird and most recently publishing its long-awaited sequel Go Set a Watchman, passed away at the age of 89 in her Alabama home. As we come to terms with the news and dust off our worn-in copies of To Kill a Mockingbird, fans of the reclusive author are taking to Twitter to voice their thoughts on Lee's passing, as well as stress the impact the Monroeville native had on the literary world. View the story "Twitter »

- Grace Gavilanes, @gracegavilanes

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Harper Lee, 'To Kill a Mockingbird' Author, Dies at 89

19 February 2016 8:30 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Harper Lee, the author of literary classic "To Kill a Mockingbird," which became an Oscar-winning film, has died. She was 89.

Lee shot to fame with the 1960 publication of her first novel, "Mockingbird," which was set in Depression-era rural Alabama and revolved around a young girl, Scout, and her virtuous lawyer father, Atticus Finch, who defended a black man falsely accused of rape. The universally beloved tale won the Pulitzer Prize in 1961, and in 2007, Lee was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom for her work.

In 1962, "Mockingbird" was turned into a hit Hollywood film, starring Gregory Peck. The flick was nominated for eight Oscars -- including Best Picture -- and went on to win three, including the Best Actor statuette for Peck.

Lee first famously submitted the "Mockingbird" manuscript back in 1957, only to have it rejected, and her publisher ask her to rewrite it. That early draft, set after the events of "Mockingbird, »

- Katie Roberts

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

21-40 of 60 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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