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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003

1-20 of 42 items from 2017   « Prev | Next »


“To Kill a Mockingbird” Is Still Getting Banned Left and Right

19 October 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | TVovermind.com | See recent TVovermind.com news »

To Kill a Mockingbird is one of those books that are banned on a semi-regular basis. In main, this is because there is some rather unpleasant language in the text. However, it should be noted that the lasting popularity of the book has contributed a great deal as well. After all, no one would bother to ban a book that no one reads, which is not something that can be said about To Kill a Mockingbird when it is a critical component of school curricula throughout the United States and beyond. This time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been removed

To Kill a Mockingbird” Is Still Getting Banned Left and Right »

- Nat Berman

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Marshall review – Chadwick Boseman holds court in powerful civil rights drama

18 October 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The Black Panther star is outstanding as the real-life hotshot lawyer who defended a black man accused of rape by a white woman in 1941

It’s impossible not to get caught up in this ripping courtroom drama that watchably restages an episode early in the career of the legendary civil rights lawyer Thurgood Marshall, a decade before he worked on landmark segregation cases in the deep south. It’s 1941 and Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) is a hotshot young NAACP attorney, who, like Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird, is defending a black man accused of rape by a white woman.

As legal drama, this is fairly conventional, stuffed to the brim with stirring speeches and a-ha! moments of cross examination theatrics. Sometimes, it feels a bit glib in its focus on the bromance between Thurman and the local white lawyer (Josh Gad) he hires to work with him, though Downton »

- Cath Clarke

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'Black-ish' Star Deon Cole Fuming After 'To Kill A Mockingbird' Ban

16 October 2017 5:45 AM, PDT | TMZ | See recent TMZ news »

[[tmz:video id="0_3fove6fs"]] "Black-ish" star Deon Cole is Fuming after learning "To Kill a Mockingbird" was banned in the South and makes no bones about it -- it's a blatant attack on African-American history. We got Deon at Lax where we told him about about the ban that went down in Biloxi, Mississippi where the school board there removed the Pulitzer Prize-winning classic from its reading list because the language -- littered with N-words as it was set »

- TMZ Staff

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‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Removed From Mississippi School District Curriculum; Twitter Enraged

14 October 2017 11:11 AM, PDT | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

A Mississippi school district has pulled “To Kill a Mockingbird” from eighth grade classrooms because the novel “makes people uncomfortable.” According to The Sun Herald, the school board did not vote on the move, but rather it was an administrative and department decision made on Wednesday or Thursday. “There were complaints about it. There is some language in the book that makes people uncomfortable, and we can teach the same lesson with other books,” Kenny Holloway, Biloxi School Board vice president told the paper. “It’s still in our library. But they’re going to use another book in the 8th grade course. »

- Reid Nakamura

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Marshall – Review

12 October 2017 7:21 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

 

With the movie awards season in full gallop, this week sees the release of a perennial favorite of Academy members: the big screen biography. Now this is a special type of “biopic” in that it doesn’t focus on the entire life (or many years of the life) of the subject, as with films like Ray or The Aviator. Really this new work zeroes in on a year or so of this great person’s career, much as Steven Spielberg’s Lincoln concerned the last few months of the ole’ rail-splitter. Actually this may be closer to John Ford’s terrific Young Mr. Lincoln as it concentrates on a very early case, long before his great fame. And, in a way, this could be considered an “origin” story, much like the initial entries of movie hero franchises (or the first issues of comic book heroes). Yes, this man’s a »

- Jim Batts

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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, 'Marshall' Director on the Need for Socially Relevant Movies That Aren't "Preachy"

11 October 2017 6:30 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

When the courtroom drama is at its best, it is both a suspenseful mystery story and a thoughtful meditation on the hypocrisies and injustices of society. The courtroom is the gladiatorial arena for the ongoing clash between our highest ideals as exemplified by the law and our petty biases as shown by our attempts to circumvent those ideals. However, the goal of these movies isn’t simply to whine about society’s inadequacies, but to use the stiff bristles of intelligent legal debate to scrub off the tarnish of corruption and reveal the shining American values beneath. To Kill a Mockingbird, Twelve »

- Kareem Abdul-Jabbar

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Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain

28 September 2017 10:17 AM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

When the Academy invited press for a hard-hat tour of its long-delayed, over-budget Museum of Motion Pictures, we heard Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti say nice things, as did new Academy president John Bailey, museum director Kerry Brougher, new chair of new board of trustees Ron Meyer, and museum committee chair Kathleen Kennedy. Yes, it’s great that, after 90 (!) years of planning, we’re finally getting a 300,000 square-foot Los Angeles movie museum at the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire to celebrate Hollywood past, present, and future.

However, that’s not what we came for. We wanted to know when it’s going to be finished and what it’s going to look like. (Notably, Academy CEO Dawn Hudson, who did much of the heavy lifting and controversy-dodging about museum funding and and construction, was on site but not part of the press conference. And Lacma director Michael Govan showed up late for the construction-site tour. »

- Anne Thompson

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Academy Museum Opens Doors for Preview, But Big Financial Questions Remain

28 September 2017 10:17 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When the Academy invited press for a hard-hat tour of its long-delayed, over-budget Museum of Motion Pictures, we heard Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti say nice things, as did new Academy president John Bailey, museum director Kerry Brougher, new chair of new board of trustees Ron Meyer, and museum committee chair Kathleen Kennedy. Yes, it’s great that, after 90 (!) years of planning, we’re finally getting a 300,000 square-foot Los Angeles movie museum at the corner of Fairfax and Wilshire to celebrate Hollywood past, present, and future.

However, that’s not what we came for. We wanted to know when it’s going to be finished and what it’s going to look like. (Notably, Academy CEO Dawn Hudson, who did much of the heavy lifting and controversy-dodging about museum funding and and construction, was on site but not part of the press conference. And Lacma director Michael Govan showed up late for the construction-site tour. »

- Anne Thompson

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Best Movies to See in October: 'Blade Runner,' Wonder Woman's Origin and More

27 September 2017 5:08 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

October brings more Halloween treats than tricks at the movies – no less than five big Cannes films all make their public debuts in American theaters, from a Swedish art-world satire to a stirring French AIDS-activism drama. You also get a cold-blooded serial-killer thriller starring Michael Fassbender, a rock 'em sock 'em prison movie starring a skinhead Vince Vaughn and – finally! – the long-awaited, breathlessly anticipated Blade Runner sequel. Here's what you'll be seeing at a theater near you for the next month. Boo!

Blade Runner 2049 (Oct. 5th)

After decades of rumors, »

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Love with the Proper Stranger

9 September 2017 10:23 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

What are two individualistic, highly motivated movie stars supposed to do when faced with an unimaginative studio system eager to misuse their talents? Natalie Wood and Steve McQueen collaborate with a great writer, director and producer for an urban romance with an eye on the sexual double standard. It’s a hybrid production: a gritty drama that’s also a calculated career move.

Love with the Proper Stranger

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1963 / B&W / 1:85 widescreen / 100 min. / Street Date September 19, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring: Natalie Wood, Steve McQueen, Edie Adams, Tom Bosley, Herschel Bernardi, Harvey Lembeck, Agusta Ciolli, Nina Varela, Marilyn Chris, Richard Dysart, Arlene Golonka, Tony Mordente, Nobu McCarthy, Richard Mulligan, Vic Tayback, Dyanne Thorne, Val Avery.

Cinematography: Milton Krasner

Film Editor: Aaron Stell

Original Music: Elmer Bernstein

Written by Arnold Schulman

Produced by Alan J. Pakula

Directed by Robert Mulligan

1963’s Love with the Proper Stranger is »

- Glenn Erickson

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Annual Gone with the Wind Screening Canceled for Being Racially Insensitive

29 August 2017 7:52 AM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

There is no denying that Gone With the Wind is a certified classic, and considered one of the greatest movies ever made. But its head is firmly on the chopping block in the wake of racial tension and protests around the country. The events of Charlottesville have left a bad taste in everyone's mouth. And now this 1939 drama is being shown the exit door at one theater in Memphis, Tennessee before it screens for the 34th year in a row. The reason? It's too racially insensitive.

As it stand, fans in Memphis have wildly mixed feelings about it. As one would imagine. You probably have mixed feelings about it as well, if you remember the movie. Most millennials don't, though, and that's the problem. Though the movie has been around for nearly 80 years, some newcomers are finding it beyond shocking. Though, for its time, it isn't shocking at all.

Gone with the Wind »

- MovieWeb

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Memphis Theater Cancels Annual Screening of Gone With the Wind for Being 'Racially Insensitive'

29 August 2017 5:28 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Gone With the Wind is now gone from a Memphis, Tennessee, movie theater where it was annually screened for the past 34 years — and fans have mixed feelings about it.

The 1939 film adaptation of Margaret Mitchell’s novel of the same name — which tells the story of plantation Southern belle Scarlett O’Hara (Vivien Leigh)’s love affair with Confederate soldier Rhett Butler (Clark Gable) during the Civil War and Reconstruction periods — has been pulled from The Orpheum Theatre’s 2018 summer movie series.

Though it had been a part of The Orpheum’s annual summer movie series for years, complaints from an Aug. »

- Dave Quinn

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The Best Classic Movies for People Who Don’t Watch Older Films — IndieWire Critics Survey

28 August 2017 10:39 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Every week, IndieWire asks a select handful of film critics two questions and publishes the results on Monday. (The answer to the second, “What is the best film in theaters right now?”, can be found at the end of this post.)

A recent article (based on a very unscientific poll) argued that millennials don’t really care about old movies. Maybe that’s true, and maybe it isn’t, but the fact remains that many people disregard classic cinema on principle. These people are missing out, but it only takes one film — the right film — to change their minds and forever alter their viewing habits.

This week’s question: What is one classic film you would recommend to someone who doesn’t watch them?

Candice Frederick (@ReelTalker), Hello Beautiful, /Film, Thrillist, etc

Rebel Without a Cause.” I’ll out myself by saying that I’ve only recently seen this film »

- David Ehrlich

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12 People Who Could Not Keep It Together Over Taylor Swift's "Lwymmd" Video

28 August 2017 7:24 AM, PDT | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

The MTV VMAs went down on Sunday night, and while the show brought a few standout moments, the night was entirely taken over by the premiere of Taylor Swift's music video for her new single, "Look What You Made Me Do" (and she wasn't even at the show). Taylor decided to share the video for the scathing track at the VMAs, which was hosted by none other than her famous frenemy Katy Perry. The singer packed the video with references to her ongoing feud with Kim Kardashian and Kanye West, poked fun at that "I [heart] T.S." t-shirt worn by her ex Tom Hiddleston, and took on critics of her infamous "squad." Shortly after the premiere, the internet quickly lost its mind with good and bad opinions, both of which are equally hilarious. See the best reactions to "Lwymmd" below. RelatedStrap Yourselves In: It's Time to Unpack All Those »

- Caitlin Hacker

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Inside Marta Kauffman’s ‘Grace and Frankie’ Office

3 August 2017 9:30 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

After years spent on such shows as “Friends” and “Related,” Marta Kauffman knows that idle hands are not conducive to her productivity. Her corner office on the Paramount lot, down the hall from the writers room for Howard J. Morris and her Netflix series “Grace and Frankie,” is filled with lots of fun stuff: snacks, drawers of Silly Putty and adult coloring books, comfy furniture, a bar, and even a broken exercise bike that she swears she’ll start using after her upcoming knee replacement surgery. “When you keep your hands busy doing something like this, I find it fuels your brain,” says Kauffman, who knitted 14 hats during her final two weeks on “Friends” — gifts she bestowed to those writers.

Home Away from Home

Plenty of people bring their work home with them, but Kauffman also did the opposite. The beach house that Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin’s titular heroines use in her show is modeled »

- Whitney Friedlander

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What’s Leaving Netflix: August 2017

28 July 2017 2:43 PM, PDT | Vulture | See recent Vulture news »

The League, To Kill a Mockingbird, and more. »

- Andrew Lapin

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59 Netflix Titles That Are Disappearing From the Service in August

27 July 2017 4:55 PM, PDT | POPSUGAR | See recent BuzzSugar news »

It's that time again. Netflix has a whole slew of nostalgic classics to keep you occupied in August, but they're also getting rid of some precious gems. Superbad? Super gone. The Lizzie McGuire Movie? Arrivederci! See what other movies and shows got the ax this month. August 1 10 Things I Hate About You Justice League Unlimited, seasons one to two Justice League, season one to two Babe Babe Winkelman's Outdoor Secrets: 2014: Quarter 4 Babe: Pig in the City Beneath the Helmet Black Widow Dirty Mary, Crazy Larry Electric Slide Elizabethtown From the Terrace From Time to Time Goodbye World Horsemen Hunter X Hunter, season one to five Josef Fritzl: Story of a Monster Malibu's Most Wanted Prefontaine Russell Brand: End the Drugs War Russell Brand: From Addiction to Recovery Teacher's Pet The Delivery Man, season one The Diabolical The Heavy Water War, season one The Hunt, season one The Little Engine That Could »

- Kelsie Gibson

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From Lollobrigida to Gidget: Romance and Heartache in Italy

23 June 2017 11:01 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Here's a brief look – to be expanded – at Turner Classic Movies' June 2017 European Vacation Movie Series this evening, June 23. Tonight's destination of choice is Italy. Starring Suzanne Pleshette and Troy Donahue as the opposite of Ugly Americans who find romance and heartbreak in the Italian capital, Delmer Daves' Rome Adventure (1962) was one of the key romantic movies of the 1960s. Angie Dickinson and Rossano Brazzi co-star. In all, Rome Adventure is the sort of movie that should please fans of Daves' Technicolor melodramas like A Summer Place, Parrish, and Susan Slade. Fans of his poetic Westerns – e.g., 3:10 to Yuma, The Hanging Tree – may (or may not) be disappointed with this particular Daves effort. As an aside, Rome Adventure was, for whatever reason, a sizable hit in … Brazil. Who knows, maybe that's why Rome Adventure co-star Brazzi would find himself playing a Brazilian – a macho, traditionalist coffee plantation owner, »

- Andre Soares

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‘Better Call Saul’: Why That Blockbuster Video Scene Was Important, But Also a ‘Nail-Biter’ to Make

22 June 2017 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

[Editor’s Note: Mild spoilers for Season 3, Episode 10, “Lantern” follow.]

It’s at times easy to forget that “Better Call Saul” is a period piece, if only because its 2002-2003 setting isn’t always noticeably distinguishable from the present day. But then every once in a while, creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould slap us in the face with a reminder that this show is happening in the past. It can be as simple as a trip to a video store — but not just any video store.

Read More: ‘Better Call Saul’: The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TV

It’s something we all accepted as routine, just 15 years ago: Want to watch a movie? Go to Blockbuster Video. So in the Season 3 finale, “Lantern,” Kim (Rhea Seehorn) asks her assistant Francesca (Tina Parker) for a ride to what was once the dominant source for Americans in search of movie rentals, and we then get to see her browse the aisles in search of the perfect comfort viewing, following her near-fatal car accident the episode prior.

Executive producer Gennifer Hutchison, who wrote the season finale, told IndieWire that the decision to have Kim visit a video store came in the writers’ room, as the team discussed what Kim might possibly do after deciding to relax following her accident. “I just really loved the idea of her renting a bunch of videos and sitting around watching movies and eating junk food. Just because it’s something I relate to, it’s something I like to do when I destress. And I feel like it’s not something you see a lot of on TV and in movies,” she said.

And as a result, Gould — who directed the finale — got very excited about the idea of Kim going to not just any video store, but Blockbuster in particular. However, don’t think that this was an easy choice for the show — because according to production designer Michael Novotny, “it was a total nail-biter.”

Novotny told IndieWire that as soon as he received word that “Saul” wanted to recreate a Blockbuster, he got his team to work — specifically, the graphics department. “I can always do a set. A set’s the easy part. The hard part is the graphics and all of the art work you’re going to turn out,” he said.

But that process started before the show had actual permission to recreate a Blockbuster. “We started to build it without approval. That’s part of the nail-biting process,” he said. “It wasn’t until the day before we shot it that we got approval.”

This is because, as anyone who works in production might tell you, trying to depict a real brand on screen can be an incredibly difficult task. And the “Saul” team wanted to actually use Blockbuster iconography, which isn’t the easiest thing given that it’s a brand name you haven’t probably seen in the wild in years.

Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010, and “roughly a dozen” stores currently exist today. Thus, the set was built on one of the show’s Albuquerque soundstages, and in fact, a great deal of what was on screen was made from scratch by the “Saul” production team, including the big Blockbuster sign hanging in the wall and the period-accurate movie covers.

One thing they were able to buy: the shelving units came thanks to an ironic stroke of luck and an Albuquerque video store that was going out of business. The production was thus able to buy those displays, which Novotny made sure were shortened so that, as they shot the scene, Kim and Francesca could be seen walking through the aisles. That framing was based on Gould’s storyboards, which were altered slightly during the production process, but otherwise didn’t require any major additional construction.

But really, here’s what people care about — the movies that are being considered, as Kim prepares for an epic binge in the pre-Netflix days. None of the titles are fake, and Novotny did work carefully with his team to carefully curate the movies that appeared on screen during the scene, all of which were drawn from a list provided by Peter Gould and the writers. Here are just some of the ones we happened to spot while freeze-framing:

“A Knight’s Tale” “Lawrence of Arabia” (the 40th anniversary special edition) “Love Liza” “The Mothman Prophecies” “Punch-Drunk Love” A Richard Pryor stand-up special “Beverly Hills Ninja” “The Cheap Detective” “Hanky Panky” “Blue Thunder” “American Sledge” “Darkness Falls” “Night of the Living Dead

They’re all movies that feel appropriate to the era at least within a year or two or as classics, though unfortunately a quick Internet search can reveal whether a film in question would have been available on DVD in the year 2003. Perhaps the most glaring oversight is the appearance of Tim Burton’s “Big Fish,” which was released in theaters December 10, 2003 and made available on DVD April 27, 2004 — something Hutchison’s husband (who actually worked at Blockbuster in the past) noticed while watching the final product. “We don’t always get it right,” she admitted.

Novotny acknowledged the “Big Fish” error, but he was relatively zen about it, given the intense pressure of making the scene happen in the first place. “It really was a down to the wire thing,” he said. “If that’s as much as I’m wrong… I’m sad to hear that but at the same time I’m happy that it went as good as it did.”

Update: On Twitter, Gould offered a little clarity as to why “Big Fish” might have time traveled back a year:

And that #BigFish they mention? Could be a shoutout to my former student @johnaugust… #YesYouReadThatRight

Peter Gould (@petergould) June 23, 2017

Hutchison couldn’t remember every one of the 10 films Kim officially rented, though such a list was made during production. Beyond “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Monty Python,” she said the rest were mostly legal dramas, though she did make sure to include the Luc Besson sci-fi romp “The Fifth Element.” “That was one for some reason I was really stuck on making sure was in her stack,” Hutchison said.

While hardly the most memorable scene of the finale, it still sticks in the mind because of how it triggers memories of an experience we’ve largely lost, traded in for the convenience of Netflix.

“I like the idea of physically walking around and choosing movies,” Hutchison said. “There is something about actually going into a store, having everything broken down by genre. Sometimes with the streaming services it’s a little overwhelming, but having that physical space… I don’t know. It was like a ritual.”

And depicting that ritual was just more proof that “Better Call Saul” will always find a way to surprise us with the seemingly mundane.

Stay on top of the latest film and TV news! Sign up for our film and TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'Better Call Saul': The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TVThe 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked'Better Call Saul' Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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‘Better Call Saul’: Why That Blockbuster Video Scene Was Important, But Also a ‘Nail-Biter’ to Make

22 June 2017 1:41 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: Mild spoilers for Season 3, Episode 10, “Lantern” follow.]

It’s at times easy to forget that “Better Call Saul” is a period piece, if only because its 2002-2003 setting isn’t always noticeably distinguishable from the present day. But then every once in a while, creators Vince Gilligan and Peter Gould slap us in the face with a reminder that this show is happening in the past. It can be as simple as a trip to a video store — but not just any video store.

Read More: ‘Better Call Saul’: The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TV

It’s something we all accepted as routine, just 15 years ago: Want to watch a movie? Go to Blockbuster Video. So in the Season 3 finale, “Lantern,” Kim (Rhea Seehorn) asks her assistant Francesca (Tina Parker) for a ride to what was once the dominant source for Americans in search of movie rentals, and we then get to see her browse the aisles in search of the perfect comfort viewing, following her near-fatal car accident the episode prior.

Executive producer Gennifer Hutchison, who wrote the season finale, told IndieWire that the decision to have Kim visit a video store came in the writers’ room, as the team discussed what Kim might possibly do after deciding to relax following her accident. “I just really loved the idea of her renting a bunch of videos and sitting around watching movies and eating junk food. Just because it’s something I relate to, it’s something I like to do when I destress. And I feel like it’s not something you see a lot of on TV and in movies,” she said.

And as a result, Gould — who directed the finale — got very excited about the idea of Kim going to not just any video store, but Blockbuster in particular. However, don’t think that this was an easy choice for the show — because according to production designer Michael Novotny, “it was a total nail-biter.”

Novotny told IndieWire that as soon as he received word that “Saul” wanted to recreate a Blockbuster, he got his team to work — specifically, the graphics department. “I can always do a set. A set’s the easy part. The hard part is the graphics and all of the art work you’re going to turn out,” he said.

But that process started before the show had actual permission to recreate a Blockbuster. “We started to build it without approval. That’s part of the nail-biting process,” he said. “It wasn’t until the day before we shot it that we got approval.”

This is because, as anyone who works in production might tell you, trying to depict a real brand on screen can be an incredibly difficult task. And the “Saul” team wanted to actually use Blockbuster iconography, which isn’t the easiest thing given that it’s a brand name you haven’t probably seen in the wild in years.

Blockbuster went bankrupt in 2010, and “roughly a dozen” stores currently exist today. Thus, the set was built on one of the show’s Albuquerque soundstages, and in fact, a great deal of what was on screen was made from scratch by the “Saul” production team, including the big Blockbuster sign hanging in the wall and the period-accurate movie covers.

One thing they were able to buy: the shelving units came thanks to an ironic stroke of luck and an Albuquerque video store that was going out of business. The production was thus able to buy those displays, which Novotny made sure were shortened so that, as they shot the scene, Kim and Francesca could be seen walking through the aisles. That framing was based on Gould’s storyboards, which were altered slightly during the production process, but otherwise didn’t require any major additional construction.

But really, here’s what people care about — the movies that are being considered, as Kim prepares for an epic binge in the pre-Netflix days. None of the titles are fake, and Novotny did work carefully with his team to carefully curate the movies that appeared on screen during the scene, all of which were drawn from a list provided by Peter Gould and the writers. Here are just some of the ones we happened to spot while freeze-framing:

“A Knight’s Tale” “Lawrence of Arabia” (the 40th anniversary special edition) “Love Liza” “The Mothman Prophecies” “Punch-Drunk Love” A Richard Pryor stand-up special “Beverly Hills Ninja” “The Cheap Detective” “Hanky Panky” “Blue Thunder” “American Sledge” “Darkness Falls” “Night of the Living Dead

They’re all movies that feel appropriate to the era at least within a year or two or as classics, though unfortunately a quick Internet search can reveal whether a film in question would have been available on DVD in the year 2003. Perhaps the most glaring oversight is the appearance of Tim Burton’s “Big Fish,” which was released in theaters December 10, 2003 and made available on DVD April 27, 2004 — something Hutchison’s husband (who actually worked at Blockbuster in the past) noticed while watching the final product. “We don’t always get it right,” she admitted.

Novotny acknowledged the “Big Fish” error, but he was relatively zen about it, given the intense pressure of making the scene happen in the first place. “It really was a down to the wire thing,” he said. “If that’s as much as I’m wrong… I’m sad to hear that but at the same time I’m happy that it went as good as it did.”

Update: On Twitter, Gould offered a little clarity as to why “Big Fish” might have time traveled back a year:

And that #BigFish they mention? Could be a shoutout to my former student @johnaugust… #YesYouReadThatRight

Peter Gould (@petergould) June 23, 2017

Hutchison couldn’t remember every one of the 10 films Kim officially rented, though such a list was made during production. Beyond “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Monty Python,” she said the rest were mostly legal dramas, though she did make sure to include the Luc Besson sci-fi romp “The Fifth Element.” “That was one for some reason I was really stuck on making sure was in her stack,” Hutchison said.

While hardly the most memorable scene of the finale, it still sticks in the mind because of how it triggers memories of an experience we’ve largely lost, traded in for the convenience of Netflix.

“I like the idea of physically walking around and choosing movies,” Hutchison said. “There is something about actually going into a store, having everything broken down by genre. Sometimes with the streaming services it’s a little overwhelming, but having that physical space… I don’t know. It was like a ritual.”

And depicting that ritual was just more proof that “Better Call Saul” will always find a way to surprise us with the seemingly mundane.

Stay on top of the latest film and TV news! Sign up for our film and TV email newsletter here.

Related stories'Better Call Saul': The 7 Times Jimmy and Kim Kissed On Screen, And How That Makes It The Most Rewarding Romance on TVThe 20 Best-Directed TV Drama Series of the 21st Century, Ranked'Better Call Saul' Review: Season 3 Finale Proves A Good Man Knows When to Give Up »

- Liz Shannon Miller

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