8.0/10
62,513
304 user 122 critic

The Manchurian Candidate (1962)

Approved | | Drama, Thriller | 24 October 1962 (USA)
A former prisoner of war is brainwashed as an unwitting assassin for an international Communist conspiracy.

Director:

Writers:

(based upon a novel by), (screenplay)
Reviews
Popularity
3,200 ( 1,436)

On Disc

at Amazon

Nominated for 2 Oscars. Another 5 wins & 6 nominations. See more awards »
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
...
Khigh Dhiegh ...
James Edwards ...
Douglas Henderson ...
Albert Paulsen ...
...
...
Madame Spivy ...
Female Berezovo
Edit

Storyline

Major Ben Marco (Frank Sinatra) is an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army. He served valiantly as a captain in the Korean war and his Sergeant, Raymond Shaw (Laurence Harvey), even won the Medal of Honor. Marco has a major problem however: he has a recurring nightmare, one where two members of his squad are killed by Shaw. He's put on indefinite sick leave and visits Shaw in New York. Shaw for his part has established himself well, despite the misgivings of his domineering mother, Mrs. Eleanor Shaw Iselin (Angela Lansbury). She is a red-baiter, accusing anyone who disagrees with her right-wing reactionary views of being a Communist. Raymond hates her, not only for how she's treated him but equally because of his step-father, the ineffectual U.S. Senator John Iselin (James Gregory), who is intent on seeking higher office. When Marco learns that others in his Korean War unit have nightmares similar to his own, he realizes that something happened to all of them in Korea and that ... Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

Once unbelievable. Now unthinkable. The chilling classic returns [rerelease] See more »

Genres:

Drama | Thriller

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Official Sites:

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

24 October 1962 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Botschafter der Angst  »

Box Office

Budget:

$2,200,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Westrex Recording System)| |

Aspect Ratio:

1.66 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

In joke: During the prologue set in 1952, one of the bar girls reads an old movie magazine with a cover shot of Tony Curtis and his then-wife, Janet Leigh who plays Rosie. See more »

Goofs

In the opening sequence when the Korean tells the US soldiers that there is quicksand, Raymond says "can't we go around it?" and the Korean says "No Sergeant". A few moments later, Raymond repeats the question and the Korean repeats the answer. See more »

Quotes

Mrs. Iselin: I know you will never entirely comprehend this, Raymond, but you must believe I did not know it would be you. I served them. I fought for them. I'm on the point of winning for them the greatest foothold they would ever have in this country. And they paid me back by taking your soul away from you. I told them to build me an assassin. I wanted a killer from a world filled with killers and they chose you because they thought it would bind me closer to them.
[Puts her hands on Raymond's face]
Mrs. Iselin: But ...
[...]
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Chuck: Chuck Versus Phase Three (2010) See more »

Soundtracks

The Star-Spangled Banner
(1814) (uncredited)
Music based on "The Anacreontic Song" by John Stafford Smith
Lyrics by Francis Scott Key
Sung by Marquita Moll at the convention
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

See more (Spoiler Alert!) »

User Reviews

 
A political and social thriller/drama ahead of its time.
20 August 2001 | by (Chicago, USA) – See all my reviews

John Frankenheimer's surrealistic direction and George Axelrod's adaptation of the 1959 book by the same name offer Laurence Harvey a career defining role.

Set in 1950's, A Korean War veteran Raymond Shaw(Harvey) returns home to a medal of honor for rescuing his POW platoon from behind Chinese lines and back to safety. One of the returning soldiers, (played effectively by Frank Sinatra) however, has recurring dreams of his platoon being brainwashed and Shaw committing acts of murder.

He eventually convinces army brass that Shaw is still a puppet of his Communist-Marxist operators.

Angela Lansbury, (although barely a few years older than Harvey was at the time) plays his mother in a tour de force role. She absolutely captivates and steals every scene she is in, playing a very complex role that needs to convince the viewer of many things without much dialogue.

There's a rich cast of characters, including Janet Leigh, Henry Silva, James Edwards, and a painfully accurate James Gregory. Each character weaves through the methodical subplots and tapestry of Frankenheimer's masterful "Hitchcockian" pace.

I won't give away the plot, but dear readers, allow me to sat that this one is really worth watching--until the nail-biting and chilling conclusion.

There are many undertones in this film -- political, sexual, class and power, and social. You will want to view this film several times to approach it from different perspectives.


105 of 123 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?