The Longest Day
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Chicago Sun-Times, Friday, October 5, 1962, p. 56, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

Hollywood Reports the fate of 20th Century-Fox, once a major studio, rest largely with "The Longest Day." The studio, desperately in need of operating funds, is depending on the Darryl Zanuck movie to replenish its depleted coffers and provide cash necessary to exploit "Cleopatra" . . .

Chicago Sun-Times, Monday, October 8, 1962, p. 32, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

. . . The Pentagon not only is clamping down on the use of soldiers in movies but also is sending Darryl Zanuck a bill for $67,700 to defray the cost of U.S. troops in his "Longest Day." The film is being hailed as the most authentic war movie ever made.

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Chicago Tribune, Friday, May 4, 1962, pt. 1, p. 14, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

Friday Flip Flop: Bossman Spyros Skouras and the bulk of his 20th Century-Fox studio has jetted to Paris and Rome for the week-end to see the "rushes" of two movies: Zanuck's "The Longest Day," and the other one, "Cleopatra." The two hunks of celluloid had better sell; they represent about 40 million bucks and the studio's future hangs in the balance. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Friday, September 21, 1962, pt. 1, p. 16, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

. . . . Gal who flipped the press and consulate officials here last week, was the lovely, sensitive French actress, Irina Demich, star of D. F. Zanuck's blockbuster, "The Longest Day." And I had to be on a vacation! She'll be the next big foreign star. . . .

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Chicago American, Monday, October 8, 1962, p. 17, c. 1:

DALY DIARY

by Maggie Daly

French Line . . . . At French Consul Jean Beliard's party for actress Irina Demich, who stars in "The Longest Day" [the new film about the Normandy invasion], we asked the enchanting woman from Paris whether she had bought any clothes in the United States. She said in French, "No, only cold cream and underwear." Other party guests were Mrs. B. E. Bessinger and the Adlai Stevensons Jr.

*********

Sights and Scenes. . . .

Raymond Bomparte, the Ambassador's catering director, embracing Mme. Janine Gille, one of France's most honored women and a friend he hadn't seen since 1932--then being introduced to Irina Demich, who plays Mme. Gille, the great French resistance leader, in "The Longest Day."

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Chicago American, Tuesday, September 18, 1962, p. 9, c. 5:

ANN MARSTERS

Beautiful Unknown 'Longest Day' Star

Producer Zanuck met Irina at a cocktail party in Paris. He was enchanted by her looks and personality and undismayed by her complete lack of acting experience.

He discovered that Irina, remarkably enough, was intelligent as well as beautiful. So he decided to cast her in the picture's leading feminine role--that of Janine Boitard, heroic French resistance worker.

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Chicago Tribune, Saturday, April 7, 1962, pt. 2, p. 6, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Cable from Darryl Zanuck in Paris: "Richard Burton due here Saturday for additional scenes in "Longest Day." Every indication Elizabeth Taylor will accompany him. When he was here alone last time, Elizabeth so unhappy she actually fell sick while he was gone. The Burton set will be closed absolutely. He's agreed to shave off sideburns and cut hair."

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Chicago American, Friday, April 13, 1962, p. 22:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . . The least publicized figure in the Rome ring-a-ding is a former Copacabana beauty who was adored by Richard Burton--and vice versa--when he was appearing on Broadway in "Camelot." She showed up at Cinecitta and was a regular visitor on the "Cleopatra" set until the wildly jealous Liz Taylor decided to bar all visitors--including Eddie Fisher. When Burton made that first trip to Paris for "The Longest Day," Liz suspected Miss Copa was a passenger on her Dickie-boy's plane, which was enough to make her eat those "poisoned beans."

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Chicago Sun-Times, Sunday, April 15, 1962:

KUP'S COLUMN

Richard Burton, the party of the second part in the real-life "La Dolce Vita," is added proof that romance is good at the box-office . . . But now he apparently has proved he has what it takes to make women swoon. Darryl Zanuck, undoubtedly as a result of the adventures in Rome, has fattened Burton's role in "The Longest Day," and other movie producers are seeking his services.

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, March 1, 1962:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

I went to Santa Anita race track with Evelyn Sharp and Jean Sully, who came out a big winner. Evelyn learned to play the ponies from Gen. Omar Bradley. The system: bet the longshots to place and show. I broke even.

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Chicago Tribune, November 11, 1971, s. 2, p. 27, c. 1 [extract]:

'The Longest Day,' Darryl F. Zanuck's Really Big Movie, Comes to Television

"The Longest Day," which is estimated to have cost about $8 million to make, to date is estimated to have grossed over $100 million, the most tickets ever sold for a black-and-white picture.

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, July 4, 1963, p. 14, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

. . . . Twentieth Century-Fox, reassuring its stockholders, is putting out regular box office bulletins. "Cleo" and "The Longest Day" grossed $3,352,961 [a record] between 'em in the six-day period ending July 1. . . .

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Chicago American, Tuesday, October 9, 1962, p. 15, c. 5:

ANN MARSTERS

But no matter how great the picture's box-office draw, it can't begin to show a profit for a long time. As Zanuck said, "It won't show much this year. Road shows do not bring in immense profits, and we have only 50 road shows world-wide. We'll know more about it after the general release in June, 1963."

Zanuck hopes to reopen the studio, rescued from the brink of bankruptcy, before 1964. He is working long hours in his New York City office, sometimes from daybreak until after midnight--planning, planning, planning.

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, May 20, 1963, pt. 1, p. 24, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

What's the "Cleo" outlook? Twentieth Century Fox stock has almost doubled since last Thanksgiving . . . The Pentagon and Hollywood are at war over the defense department's crackdown on cooperation with producers of future military movies. The new rules compel the make-believers to get detailed O. K.'s from headquarters for all scenes, not from field commanders as in the past. [It started with congressional beefs over the wide use of army personnel by D. F. Zanuck for "The Longest Day."] This blunt quote from Y. Frank Freeman, veep of Paramount and board chairman of the Association of Motion Picture Producers, is a rocker: "We'll fight. The movie industry has done more for the armed forces than the armed forces has done for the movie industry!" Well!

Chicago Tribune, Saturday, April 28, 1962, pt. 2, p. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Our Hedda Looks In On Press Party

New York, April 27---Darryl Zanuck, here from Paris to show part of his film, "The Longest Day," to the Twentieth Century-Fox home office boys, brought Irina Demich [the only woman in the picture] to the New York News party in the Plaza ballroom. I started to strike up a conversation with Irina when Zanuck interrupted with, "She doesn't understand a word of English." . . . "Aren't you going to teach her?" Zanuck tells me the film will open at the Paris Opera house.

Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, August 9, 1961, pt. 2, p. 3 c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Tommy Sands and Nancy will be off soon to London where he'll do a cameo role in Darryl Zanuck's "The Longest Day." Then, after a short trip to Honolulu, Tommy would like to get back to Actors Studio for a refresher course; he studied there for six months once before. . . .

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Chicago American, Monday, September 18, 1961:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Tommy Sands has been summoned to Europe by Darryl Zanuck to make some added scenes for "The Longest Day." But Tommy first goes to Honolulu with Nancy on that long delayed honeymoon.

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Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, February 15, 1961, pt. 3, p. 8, c. 2:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Darryl Zanuck is preparing "The Longest Day," a story of the Normandy invasion, and considers it the most ambitious picture of his career. He has assembled technical experts from France, England, Canada, West Germany, and the United States. Troops of all nationalities will be played by actual soldiers except for six major roles requiring trained actors. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Friday, July 21, 1961, pt. 3, p. 13, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Bill Holden is the first actor signed by Darryl F. Zanuck for "The Longest Day." This week Gottfried Reinhardt meets with Holden in London, where Bill is making "The Devil Never Sleeps," to discuss his co-starring with John Mills in "The Hiding Place," a comedy from the Robert Shaw novel. Reinhardt produces and directs for Mirisch Bros., and the picture will be made in Munich, Vienna, and possibly Paris.

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Chicago Tribune. Monday, July 24, 1961, pt. 2, p. 6, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

Holden to Be War II Hero in Zanuck's 'Longest Day'

by Hedda Hopper

Paris, July 23---I lunched with Darryl Zanuck, who hasn't looked so well in 10 years. He swore he returned to town for one day just to see me but I suspect foul weather on that dripping yacht might have had something to with it, too. Susan and her two older children were aboard with him. He's wildly excited about "The Longest Day," and scenes he took of the June 6, 1944, invasion covered half the front page in the French paper today. Francoise Sagan offered him her home in Normandy while he's shooting there, but he says he'll look it over first. I've never known him in better form. He's cast Bill Holden as Lt. Col. Benjamin Vandervoort of the 82nd airborne division, one of 25 men in key postions on D day. Vanderbvoort broke his ankle on the jump, insisted on leading his attack anyway, laced his boot tightly, and used his gun as a crutch. Later he was hauled in an ammuntion cart, shooting as he was being towed along. He didn't see a doctor for four days, took his objective, Sainte Mere Eglise, the first town Americans captured. He was a cold man and never nicknamed by his troops; but after the landing they had a change of heart. Zanuck says this comes over wonderfully in the script.

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, July 24, 1961, pt 2, p. 6, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Darryl's romance with Juliette Greco is over. When he told her he'd be on "The Longest Day" a year or more, she said, "How about me?" He told her there was no part in it for her. He said, "The look on her face told me what I wanted to know."

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, October 8, 1962, pt. 1, p. 22, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

Seven out of the seven New York flicker critics had to find new adjectives to rave over D. Zanuck's, "The Longest Day," which midwest premieres Wednesday night at the Roosevelt, via an Amvet benefit. Reminder: We'll be on deck with a WCFL mike to capture the color. . . . .

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Chicago American, Tuesday, October 9, 1962, p. 15, c. 5:

ANN MARSTERS

Darryl Zanuck, chief of Twentieth Century-Fox, is elated over rave reviews by Manhattan critics of his "The Longest Day," which starts Thursday in the Roosevelt. The New York Daily News called it "The most exciting, suspenseful, and realistic war film ever transcribed from the printed word."

_____________________

Chicago Tribune, Friday, October 12, 1962:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

. . . . Chicago's movie critics joined the New York set in doing raves over D. F. Zanuck's "The Longest Day," now a reserve seater at the Roosevelt. It's a spine tingler all right. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, October 4, 1962, pt. 4, p. 24, c. 5:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Well, the little colonel has really done it this time. "The Longest Day" is a war story to end all war stories. It followed the book in every detail; shows the horrifying futility of war. When Darryl Zanuck was making it, he was warned not to let German and French actors speak in their natural tongues. He ignored that. They do--with subtitles--and it adds great impetus to the film. There's so much credit for everyone, and to name all of them would take this entire column. But the misery, suffering, sensless killing is too horrible to contemplate. It's a brilliant picture . . . . Now a British writer is trying to start the war all over again by saying, "Why wasn't the film shown first in Britain instead of France? Let us never forget that most of the troops who fought and died on D-day were British. We provided most of the blood, brains, muscle, sweat, and sinew." Well, I have news for them. It was the combined forces that did it and not one country alone.

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Chicago Tribune, Sunday, October 21, 1962, Magazine section, p . 64, c. 2:

UNDER HEDDA'S HAT

To Find Curt Jurgens . . . Look in the Lap of Luxury

by Hedda Hopper

Jurgens' most recent European picture was Darryl Zanuck's "The Longest Day," in which he played the role of Maj. Gunther Blumentritt. He was arranging his return to Paris to coincide with the premiere of the picture there this fall. "I wouldn't miss it for the world," he said. "It will be a grand affair at the Palais du Chaillot--a dancing supper for 400, with fireworks. There'll be beautiful women magnificently jeweled, and diplomats of all countries wearing their colorful decorations. Nowhere else in the world can a premiere be done like that."

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, October 26, 1961, pt. 4, p. 5, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

You'd think Darryl Zanuck would soon run out of actors for "The Longest Day." He's now signed Jeffrey Hunter to play a GI in the invasion of Omaha beach, with Bob Mitchum and Eddie Albert. This won't be Jeff's first war picture--he made "From Hell to Eternity," and when he finishes this one he goes to the Philippines for another. His biggest role to date was Jesus in"King of Kings." Incidentally, Zanuck wouldn't use Audie Murphy in "Longest Day." He said, "Hell, everybody knows he was at Anzio." But where were these other guys?

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, December 18, 1961, s. 3, p. 10, c. 2:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Jeffrey Hunter flew to Paris yesterday for one day's shooting on "The Longest Day." After the first of the year he takes off for Manila to star in "No Man Is an Island," the story of George Tweed, who holed up on Guam during the Japanese invasion, was fed by the natives, and went undiscovered for 34 months.

___________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Thursday, October 5, 1961, pt. 7, p. 3, c. 3:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Darryl Zanuck is no slouch when it comes to getting the right actors for the right parts. He has the famed German stage actor, Werner Hinz, and his son, Michael, playing Field Marshal Erwin Rommel and his teenage son, Manfred, in "The Longest Day." . . .

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Chicago American, Friday, June 9, 1961, p. 20, c. 4:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Bob Wagner, who'll go to Rome with Natalie Wood for her Warner assignment, "Lovers Must Learn," is going for more than the ride. He'll meet with Darryl Zanuck in Europe to complete a deal to play in "The Longest Day."

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, Octobe 9, 1961, p. 10, c. 7:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Bob Wagner's part in "The Longest Day" was built up by Darryl Zanuck from a three day bit to a four week job. When he finishes a picture in London, Bob will return to Darryl's for his added scenes.

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Chicago American, Friday, October 27, 1961, p. 18, c. 5:

DOROTHY MANNERS

[While Louella Parsons is in New York her column is being written by Dorothy Manners.]

With nothing to return to in Hollywood since his parting from Natalie Wood, Bob Wagner isn't coming back, at least not very soon. If he isn't happy in Europe, he's at least very busy, finishing up "The War Lover" in London and before that "The Longest Day."

Now Bob writes that he'll stay on to star in "Early in the Morning," which Richard Fleischer will produce and direct for Nautilus Productions. "We'll shoot in Monaco and the Italian Alps, which should be white and pretty over the holidays," writes Bob.

_________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Thursday, November 15, 1962, pt. 1, p. 26, c. 2:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

Teen idol Fabian, in to plug a record, saw himself in "The Longest Day" film at the Roosevelt--for the first time. . . .

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New York Times, July 21, 1961, p. 14, c. 1:

OF LOCAL ORIGIN

First castings have been announced for Darryl F. Zanuck's production of "The Longest Day," the Cornelius Ryan book on the D-Day landings, which Twentieth Century-Fox will release. Pre-production work has begun, with Mr. Zanuck using Paris as a base of operations.

Signed for the French segment of the film were Jean Louis Barrault (as a priest), Christian Marquand (as head of the French Commandos), Daniel Gelin (as a paratrooper sergeant), Bernard Blier (as Mayor of St. Mere Eglise} and Arletty, Fernand Ledoux and Madeleine Renaud in other key parts.

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Chicago American, Thursday, September 13, 1962:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Paul Anka, tho only 21, knows how to succeed. When he spoke to Darryl Zanuck about composing a song for "The Longest Day," Darryl said he wasn't interested. That didn't deter Paul, who returned to New York City and worked for two days and finally recorded what he had written with a male chorus and full orchestra.

The next time he hears it will be on Sept. 25, at an official French premiere of "The Longest Day" in Paris. It will be played by the French state orchestra.

Meanwhile, Mitch Miller has recorded the number with his TV singers for Columbia records.

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Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, March 14, 1962, pt. 3, p. 8, c. 7:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . I caught Audie Murphy before he took off for Dallas to sit for Artist Dmitri Vail, and asked why he hadn't made a picture lately. "I've been trying to find one different from that western I've made 20 times," he said. "Darryl Zanuck wouldn't use me in his D-day invasion because I landed at Anzio--wrong beach. Universal-International is doing a strategic air command picture, but I'm out--I was in the infantry. To show you how tough things are, I couldn't even get a part in 'The Alamo.' So I've been down at the ranch watching my horses eat--and, believe me, they're doing better than I am."

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, January 25, 1962, pt/. 3, p. 4, c. 2:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . My praise of Stuart Whitman's performance in "The Mark" brought results. Academy members will be able to see the film Sunday at the Screen Directors Guild theater, and it starts a ten week engagement Friday in the Vagabond theater. Meantime, Whitman is in Paris for two and a half weeks with Darryl Zanuck's "Longest Day."

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Chicago American, Tuesday, October 2, 1962, p. 15, c. 3:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Dick received a telegram from Darryl saying there were 70,000 persons gathered for a special premiere of "The Longest Day" in the Palace Challot in Paris. Edith Piaf sang from the top of the Eiffel tower as American, British, and French troops marched by.

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Chicago Tribune, Tuesday, December 26, 1961. pt. 2, p. 9, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, Dec. 25--Dick Beymer is doing two pictures at the same time. He flies from Verona to Paris to confer with Darryl Zanuck about "The Longest Day," which he'll sandwich in between the Italian location of "Adventures of a Young Man," and its resumption in Hollywood. . . His fiance , Dany Saval, flew to Italy while he was working there, but had to leave almost immediately to start rehearsals in "Four Persons," which opens on the Paris stage in mid-January. They'd planned a Vienna holiday with Ricardo Montalban, but that was out. Dick is learning French. When he and Dany became engaged, neither spoke the other's language. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, July 9, 1962, pt. 2, p. 2, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Richard Beymer is smart. When he finishes "Celebration," he's giving up his house here, selling his car, and hopping to New York to study acting for three weeks before starting "A Promise at Dawn," with Ingrid Bergman. "Playing opposite Bergman is a wonderful opportunity, and I intend to be prepared," Dick said. When they start filming in England, he'll be across the channel from Sharon Tate, daughter of an army officer he dated while doing "The Longest Day." As far as his romance with the French actress, Dany Saval, Beymer says it's washed, scrubbed, and clean. "She wasn't about to leave Paris--and my career is here."

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Chicago Tribune, Sunday, October 7, 1962, pt. 5, p. 12, c. 4:

TWO FILM OPENINGS GIVE CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD LOOK

The other notable opening of the week also will be Wednesday night--Darryl F. Zanuck's "The Longest Day," which will be shown at the Roosevelt theater on a reserved seat, 10-shows-a-week schedule.

The opening night will be sponsored by the Cook county council of American Veterans of World War II [AMVETS] as a benefit for its community service, child welfare, and scholarship projects. Performances open to the public will begin Thursday.

State street in front of the theater will be ablaze with klieg lights. Taking part in the ceremonies will be the AMVETS prize drum and bugle corps. Among the digniftaries expected to attend will be Mayor Richard J. Daley, Gov. Otto Kerner, Senators Paul Douglas and Everett Dirksen, Rep. Sidney Yates, and other political and military officials.

"The Longest Day" is based on Cornelius Ryan's best selling book.

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Chicago Tribune, Sunday, October 7, 1962:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

. . . . We'll be at the WCFL mike in front of the Roosevelt theater Wednesday night, covering the celeb-jammed premiere of Darryl Zanuck's big one. "The Longest Day." Intrerviewees: The mayor, the governor, our state's two United Staes senators, show biz stars, etc., in a maze of yoo-hoo-hoopla. The "Day" box office lines are long.

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[Same], Wednesday, October 10, 1962, pt. 1, p. 24, c. 1:

. . . . We hit the air at 7:30 tonight, via a WCFL mike, to cover the color at the Roosevelt theater Amvet premiere of Darryl Zanuck's "The Longest Day." Gov. Kerner, Mayor Daley, Senators Dirksen and Douglas, Candidate Sid Yates and such show biz stars as Youngman, the Kim Sisters, Robert Clary, Louis Nye, and Gene Krupa will join us. . . . It's official. Zanuck has just named his son, Richard, head of production at Twentieth Century-Fox. Dick is qualified. Among his hits are "Compulsion" and "The Chapman Report."

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[NOTE: Later the film was sent out to the "nabes" on Friday, June 28, 1963, and ran for several weeks; an ad read: "TODAY---You Can See The Internationally Acclaimed Hit just as it Was Shown in the Major Capitals of the World!". The film was again released to Chicago neighborhood theatres on the 25th Anniversary of D-Day, on Friday, June 6, 1969, and the film ran in various movie houses for several weeks; an ad read: "Never So Timely! Never So Great! . . . See It During The 25th Anniversary Year of D-Day . . . "Stupendous! There are no more worlds to conquer"---New York Times"

_______________________.

Chicago American, Thursday, September 20, 1962, p. 37, c. 3:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

New York--Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon have accepted Darryl Zanuck's invitation for the Oct. 11 London premiere of "The Longest Day." However, Prince Philip and his "party" [could that include the queen?] will see it at a private screening on another night. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, March 1, 1961:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

Zanuck Pans 32 Major Roles in 'Longest Day'


by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, Feb. 28---A letter from Darryl Zanuck: "We have 32 major roles in 'The Longest Day' film. I'll use important name personalities in at least 15 key roles. If Duke Wayne is available I think he'd be wonderful as American Brig. Gen. Cota [hero of Omaha Beach]. Duke has won many battles on screen and has usually emerged victorious and unscathed. There is no reason why he shouldn't take on Normandy," which proves Darryl got his sense of humor back. . . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, January 17, 1962, s. 2, p. 6, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, Jan. 16---John [Duke] Wayne leaves to join Darryl Zanuck's "Longest Day," in which he'll play Lt. Col. Ben Vandervoort. He was the stern officer of the 82nd airborne division who broke his ankle parachuting into Normandy on D-day but continued to lead his men, using his rifle as a crutch. Duke will be away three weeks at the most, which means he'll be home for the birth of Pilar's baby the end of February. . . . Duke's son Michael is taking over the Wayne family business and studying law on the side. He aims to be the pilot fish for his pappy in the future. . . .

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Chicago Sun-Times, Tuesday, October 9, 1962, p. 44, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

Cornelius Ryan, who wrote "The Longest Day," is an unusual author. He frankly admits the movie is better than his book . . . .

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Chicago Sun-Times, Tuesday, October 9, 1962, p. 44, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

. . . . From reader Bob Dorn: "Robert Mitchum, who portrays Gen. Norman Cota in 'The Longest Day,' is listed as commanding general of the 29th Division. This is incorrect. Gen. Cota commanded the 28th (Keystone) Division and I was proud to serve under him." . . . .

No error. Cota was Assistant Division Commander of the 29th Division on D-Day. He did not rise to Division Commander of the 28th Division until August of 1944.

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, September 9, 1962, pt. 10, c. 1 (with photo):

War Heroine Featured in 'The Longest Day'

A real life World War II heroine and her screen counterpart will visit Chicago Thursday in connection with "The Longest Day," film version of the D-Day landings in France 18 years ago. They are Mme. Leonard Gille, then Janine Boitart, who ran an underground escape route for Allied fliers shot down over Normany, and Irina Demich, former French model, who plays Mme. Gille in the picture. The Darryl F. Zanuck production is based on the story by Cornelius Ryan on the invasion and comes to the Roosevelt theater Oct. 11 on a reserved seat bases.

Mme. Gille is one of her country's most honored women and is well remembered by Allied fliers, since she is credited with saving the lives of 68 of them. Her job in the French Resistance was to hide the Allied airmen who had parachuted and then conduct them to another area where another Resistance group took over. In addition to American fliers saved by Mme. Gille, there were Canadians, Britons, Poles, and Australians. She has received the highest decorations of her country and medals from United States, Britain, and Poland.

For Miss Demich, who once was one of France's top fashion and photographic models, this is her first screen appearance.

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Chicago Tribune, Tuesday, September 4, 1962, s. 2, p. 4, c. 1:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, Sept. 3---Finding an actor to play Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower became one of Darryl Zanuck's toughest problems in assesmbling a cast of 87 American, British, French, and German talents for "The Longest Day." Henry Grace, who got the part, wasn't found in acting ranks; he was chosen for his uncanny resemblance to Ike--has the same build, coloring; blue eyes, thinning hair, and infectious smile--even the same voice. He is the supervising set director at MGM, has been with them since 1933, and never tried to act before. What's more, he doesn't intend to act again, as he finds his work behind the cameras completely absorbing. He is 54, the same age as Ike was the day of the invasion, and over the years he's grown accustomed to being stared at and asked for autographs by people who mistake him for Eisenhower.

Grace found being a one-shot actor an interesting experience and not at all unnerving. "I had no difficulty memorizing the part; fortunately, it wasn't too long, and I suffered no stage fright." [Allen Swift, famed imitator, is dubbed into Grace's lip movements with such startling effect that audiences won't believe they're not watching Ike himself.] . . . .

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Chicago American, Sunday, August 6, 1961, p. 23, c. 2:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . Three writers are involved with the script for "The Longest Day," but insiders say that Darryl Zanuck has been doing most of the work himself.

_________________________________

Chicago Tribune, November 11, 1971, s. 2, p. 27, c. 1:

The groundwork for the movie began in 1959, with the publication of Ryan's highly successful book. "I'd written five books up to that time," Ryan said. "Then 'The Longest Day' came out, and to my complete amazement, it took off!"

Writing the movie script was a herculean feat. "There were five different scripts before we finished and many, many rewrites," Ryan said. "It had to be done correctly! I would say it couldn't have been done without Zanuck or without Williams [Zanuck's right-hand man, Elrmo Williams].

__________________________

Chicago Tribune, March 13, 1962:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

Problems in Making D-day Film Epic Told

by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, March 12---When Darryl Zanuck finished shooting "The Longest Day" on a 10 months schedule with a 10 million dollar cost tag, I asked how he got so many top stars together in one film and what prompted him to shoot in winter on the Atlantic coast off Normandy. He said: "At times I was swamped by the whole idea and tempted to close down production until next summer. I even played with the idea of shooting the beach landings without actors and cutting them in afterwards. But every time I faced what looked like disaster, I got a break. . . . I worked in winter against advice from every source. We were never held up except for one day, in six months of exteriors. We had many seasick fellows on our hands and almost lost a couple of landing craft, but you can write that down to realism. Our GIs were plenty seasick on D day, 1944.

____________________________

The network television premiere of the hit Fox film, The Longest Day, happened on Sunday, November 14, 1971, at 7 p.m. (and ran until 10:45 p.m. (CST), and was featured at ABC Sunday Night Movie, starting at the special time of 7 p.m.. The encore presentation happened in 1973.

_________________________

New York Times, Sunday, March 21, 1961, s. 10, p. 7, c. 4:

'D-Day, Zanuck's War'

[extracted]

Suddenly Zanuck ended his pacing.

"Remember our story is not a military picture," he said, with sharply perceptive irony. "It's not a war picture. It's the heartbeats on both sides. All you can do is to get the buildup ready for the day we say 'Shoot'." (Last-minute intelligence was that, regardless of developments in France, this would be the British side on July 17).

______________________________

Chicago American, Monday, February 26, 1962, p. 6, c. 7:

NAZI MINES ON LOCATION

Remnants of German preparations to repel the 1944 Allied invasion of Normany still present a danger on that part of the French coast.

Darryl F. Zanuck's D-day epic, "The Longest Day," has on-the-spot scenes showing Marshal Erwin Rommel directing plans to meet the Allies' threat.

By the time Gen. Dwight Eisenhower gave the signal for the Allies to cross the English channel June 6, 1944, Rommel had succeeded in burying 6 million mines and was laying 5 million more.

Elaborate precautions were taken to avoid accidents during the filming. Some mines were detected on the location and detonated by French soldiers.

________________________

Chicago Tribune, Friday, February 9, 1962, s. 3, p. 14, c. 4:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . When Dick Beymar returns from Paris where he's been making "The Longest Day," he'll be met by Bob Wise, who wants to borrow him from Twentieth Century-Fox for the romantic lead in "The Haunting," taken from "The Haunting of Hillhouse," by Shirley Jackson. The professor part has already been given to Peter Ustinov. There's a little problem here with Beymer. Jerry Wald also wants him for "Celebration."

___________________________

Chicago Daily News, Friday, February 2, 1962, p. 10, c. 4 (with photo):

John Wayne Says Nuts

D-Day Is June in January

By Sam Lesner

June in January may be great for a song title, but big John Wayne has one word, "Nuts!" for romantic song writers.

January is damp and cold on the Normandy beaches and June 6, 1944, was a gray, cold day, too.

That's why Darryl F. Zanuck is making like June in January now on the beaches of Normandy where he is filming "The Longest Day", drama of D-Day.

With a cold in the head, and working in cotton battle fatigue uniform, it was a very long day for Wayne, too early this week when I talked with him via trans-Atlantic telephone.

It was 10:15 p.m. in Boulogne, France, where Zanuck has his production headquarters for a war drama that appears to have a whole division of film stars working in it.

Wayne now in his 32nd year as a screen actor, and a star for 21-years, is playing the role of Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Vandervoort of the 82nd Airborne Division.

Serious and unbending, Vandervoort was respected but never liked by his men and his superiors. D-Day changed all that.

Vandervoort broke his ankle when he jumped with his men outside St. Mere Eglise.

He fought through the crucial first 40 days of the invasion on his broken ankle side by side with his men.

"I'm playing the role with a simulated broken ankle, but the cold in the head is real," Wayne grumbled.

"This is unbelievable, though the way, Zanuck has recreated in every detail the atmosphere of D-Day," Wayne said.

The two-fisted actor has re-fought most of the major campaigns of the War in the Pacific in such screen epics as "Sands of Iwo Jima," "The Fighting Seabees," "Back to Bataan" and "They Were Expendable."

But this is his first go at World War II in the European Theater.

Which war do you prefer, Wayne was asked. "____!," he replied.

"You can win a war and lose the battle and I'm not aimin' to lose this battle!"

That was definitive.

Wayne added that his own production, "The Alamo," is making monkeys' of some critics who couldn't see it as boxoffice.

"All the investors will be paid off before I get back a die of my money. Sure I'll produce and direct again when a story comes along that I like."

In the meantime, Wayne has added his might to the allied might of Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, Peter Lawford, Robert Wagner, Eddie Albert, Jeffrey Hunter, Paul Anka, Fabian, Tommy Sands, Edmund OBrien, Red Buttons, Ray Danton, Richard Todd and Kenneth More to win Darryl Zanuck's biggest screen battle, "The Longest Day," which promises to be the first definitive drama of D-Day.

________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Wednesday, February 14, 1962, s. 3, p. 6, c. 7:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

One fine picture can do it for an actor. "The Mark" certainly has for Stu Whitmen, who has just returned from doing "Longest Day" in Paris. While there he met Carl Foreman, who has a role for him in his next, "The Victors"; Twentieth Century-Fox is talking with him about co-starring opposite Marilyn Monroe; Lewis Milestone wants him for "Against the Wind"; an Italian company wants to sign him for a film about three GIs, and Stu owns a story, "Mandrake Root," which Sidney Buchman may do with him. . . .

___________________________

Chicago Tribune, Friday, June 15, 1979, s. 5, p. 1, c. 1:

Action line

Q--Could you help us? We have spent four days researching a simple question and have come up empty-handed. What does D-Day stand for as in D-Day, June 6, 1944, the date of the invasion of Normandy by the Allied Forces? Why a "D"?

W. O., DeKalb

A--Take your choice: "Designated," "Date," or "Day." Not finding information to the contrary, we would go with the first letter of "Day" as in "H-Hour." Actually, "D-Day" was simply the term for the date of the beginning of any invasion or military operation. The third day afterwards, for example, was called "D-Day plus 3". The "D" had no special significance, and June 6, 1944, was simply the most famous of World War II's "D-Days". Of course, "V-E Day" and "V-J Day" had specific, translatable meanings for the day of victory in Europe or over Japan.

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Chicago Sun-Times, Tuesday, December 12, 1961, p. 30, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

Darryl Zanuck, filming "Longest Day" in France, was reminiscing about the boo-boos in his movie career and selected Liz Taylor as the greatest. He completely overlooked her as a potential star. As a youngster, Liz played with Zanuck's daughter and was in and out of his home regularly. Not until he saw Miss Taylor in her first movie, "National Velvet," did he realize how he had goofed. . . .

________________________________

Chicago American, Saturday, August 12, 1961, p. 9, c. 7:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Paul Anka and Red Buttons will join Fabian and Tommy Sands in Zanuck's picture, "The Longest Day."

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Chicago American, Tuesday, August 8, 1961, p. 9, c. 1:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . Peter Lawford has been cast as Lord Lovat, British commando leader, in Zanuck's epic, "The Longest Day." . . .

________________________________________________

Chicago American, Friday, August 11, 1961:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Lawford Shuns Clan's Hi-Jinks on European Trip

Hollywood, Cal.---In all the hi-jinks being staged by the "clan" in Europe, Peter Lawford is conspicuously a nonparticipant. Peter is very conscious of the dignity of being the brother-in-law of President Kennedy in these dangerous times. Tho he is a pal of Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Joey Bishop, and Sammy Davis, Jr., he prefers to remain in the background.

Peter will remain in Europe until October. He's been signed by Darryl Zanuck for the featured role of Lord Lovat, who leads the British invasion on D-Day in "The Longest Day." This is a top part, not a cameo.

From Europe Pete will head for Washington, D.C., to start "Advise and Consent."

_________________________________

Chicago American, Monday, November 13, 1961, p. 17, c. 1:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

New York---Gossip in Gotham---It appears that the Clan's ambassador to the White House, Peter Lawford, may not be able to greet President Kennedy when he arrives in California later this month. Movie duty calls Peter; Darryl Zanuck has summoned him back to France to film more scenes for "The Longest Day," and he's supposed to leave soon. . . .

________________________________

Chicago American, Wednesday, October 25, 1961, p. 25, c. 6:

DOROTHY MANNERS

Off to France again are Pat and Peter Lawford, who will leave Hollywood Nov. 17 for Pete's scenes in "The Longest Day." He says:

"I'm hoping to wind up my part so we can be back here for Christmas with the children--if I don't come down with pneumonia.

"Darryl Zanuck told me on the phone the other day that all my early scenes show me wading ashore in freezing waters."

__________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, February, 11, 1973, s. 9 [magazine], p. 44, c. 2:

Good to the Last Day: Inside Europe's Rejuvenation clinics, where the aging and ailing take "youth shots" of lamb cells for a new lease on life

by Ted Burke

[Extract]

Every patient receives 8 to 10 shots in the buttocks--all within three or four minutes. French actress Pauline Carton who took them, said: "A nurse told me to lie face down, bottom up. Then came the needle shots, one after another like a machine gun. I felt swollen and tired for about half an hour."

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New York Times, Wednesday, September 26, 1962, p. 32, c. 1:

PARIS PREMIERE FOR 'LONGEST DAY'

Piaf Sings at Eiffel Tower for Gala Film Debut


by Robert Alden Special to the New York Times

Paris, Sept. 25---The world premiere of the motion picture "The Longest Day" took place tonight at a glittering Parisian gala that had the Eiffel Tower sparkling.

It was the kind of event that Paris does with a kind of brilliance that is hard to march. Detachments of British, French and American soldiers drew stiffly to attention before the Palais de Chaillot as the guests arrived in a dazzling array of furs and gowns and extravagant jewelry.

____________________________________________

Chicago American, Wednesday, July 26, 1961:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

A cable from Darryl Zanuck brings word that he has cast British actor Richard Todd as Maj. John Howard in "The Longest Day."

Darryl said: "A strange angle is that Todd was a lieutenant in the airborne infantry troop which Maj. Howard led and which captured the Orne river bridge in a glider attack on June 6, 1944.

"Howard himself has been engaged by me as technical consultant for this scene. Our location shooting starts Tuesday on Normandy beach."

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Chicago American, Wednesday, August 9, 1961, p. 21, c. 3:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Fabian, still in the east, sends word that Darryl Zanuck has offered him a featured role in "The Longest Day." Fabian told Me:

"I'm leaving almost immediately for Paris. I'll play one of the soldiers. The best part, too, is that I can eat my cake and have it, because I am promised that I will be finished in time to keep my engagement at Steel pier in Atlantic City over Labor day."

I had no more than received this news from Fabian, when word came from Zanuck that he has a new find---Irina Demich, red headed French model.

This is Irina's first movie and she will play a resistance worker in Normandy.

_______________________________

[same], Tuesday, August 29, 1961, p. 13, c. 5:

Fabian writes from France that he is loving every minute in Paris. He's there for the Zanuck picture, "The Longest Day."

________________________________

Chicago American, Thursday, October 19, 1961, p. 35, c. 8:

Fabian Signs for 'Hobbs'

Fabian, teen-age actor-recording artist who recently completed a role in "The Longest Day," has been signed to star with James Stewart and Maureen O'Hara in "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation," soon to go before the cameras.

________________________

Chicago American, Tuesday October 3, 1961:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

That Fabian gets around. Just back from completing "The Longest Day" in Europe, he's off for a 6 week singing tour of Denmark, Sweden, and Norway.

_________________________________

[Same], Saturday, December 30, 1961, p. 7, c. 7:

Fabian received an encore from Darryl F. Zanuck to return to Europe as soon as he finishes "Mr. Hobbs Takes a Vacation." Darryl has in mind an enlarged role for Fabian in "The Longest Day."

________________________________



Chicago American, Sunday, September 3, 1961, p. 18, c. 2:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . . There is evidently no budget for "The Longest Day." Producer Darryl Zanuck is dealing not just with actors and actors' agents, he's dealing with countries and cabinets. One nation which sent half its fleet to appear in the picture was at a loss as to how to send the bill for services rendered. It's representatives just said they wouldn't know what to charge Zanuck until after the next session of parliament.

______________________________

Chicago American, Wednesday, August 16, 1961, p. 20, c. 4:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

Paul Anka Set for Soldier Role


New York---Miss Midnight's Notebook: Young singing sensation Paul Anka has been signed by Darryl Zanuck for an important role in "The Longest Day," currently before the cameras in Normandy. He flies to France next week to play an American ranger who played a key part in the D-day landings . . . .

_________________________________

Chicago American, Tuesday, August 23, 1961, p. 9, c. 4:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Paul Anka no more than landed in London for his TV spectacular than he did a walkon for the Bob Hope-Bing Crosby "Road to Hong Kong." His next stop is France, for "The Longest Day."

_____________________________________

Chicago American, Thursday, October 12, 1961, p. 32, c. 3:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Before Robert Mitchum punches the time clock at the Mirisch Bros. studio for "Two for the Seesaw," he'll fly to Paris Oct. 23 to play one of the top heroes of D-day. Darryl Zanuck phoned Bob long-distance to ask him to play Brig. Gen. Norman Cota in "The Longest Day."

Bob will work for 2 weeks, then vacation in Europe until Dec. 15, when he'll report back to Paris for another week of interior filming.

"The Longest Day" will have a huge cast. Here's just a few of the names: William Holden, Richard Todd, Robert Wagner, Peter Lawford, Paul Anka, Curt Jurgens, Tommy Sands, Fabian, Red Button and Irina Demich.

______________________________________

Chicago American, Friday, October 20, 1961, p. 20, c. 4:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . . Will Darryl Zanuck succeed in signing Tony Perkins and Robert Mitchum for roles in "The Longest Day?" . . . .

_________________________________

Chicago American, Friday, November 24, 1961, p. 16, c. 4:

Nazi Forts Used in Film

A former Nazi island stronghold off the French coast is providing Darryl F. Zanuck with an authentic locale for his CinemaScope saga of World War II, "The Longest Day."

The site is the rough terrained Ile de Re, which was fortified by the Germans in the early 1940s.

Since the sturdy bunkers were still there, Zanuck took over the site for the shooting of the invasion epic based on Cornelius Ryan's best seller.

William Holden, Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, Peter Lawford, Robert Wagner, Richard Todd, and Red Buttons head the cast.

__________________________

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, October 14, 1962, pt. 5, p. 11, c. 1 (extract):

Stars Often Born, Rarely Discovered

by Robert Anderson

For Irina Demich, a French fashion model and former dress designer, the big moment came without warning at a quiet cocktail party in Paris when she was introduced to Darryl F. Zanuck. He had been signing top stars in several countries for "The Longest Day," which opened last week at the Roosevelt theater. He was looking for "a fresh new face" to play the role of Janine Boitard, a French resistance worker.

The glass slipper fit Irina perfectly, and she was soon ankle deep in battle scene mud as Zanuck's cameras ground out the story of the first agonizing 24 hours of the Normandy invasion.

Irina says she was "plain scared" in making the movie. "I wanted to act, but I never thought I would start out in so important a part. Now I must work very hard to do it justice."

Zanuck was pleased with her performance, and says he believes the beautiful red-haired Parisian "has every chance of becoming a great new screen personality."

________________________________

Chicago American, November 21, 1961, p. 16, c. 1:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . .Film biggies connected with the controversial Darryl Zanuck picture, "The Longest Day," in American troops were used as extras, say the Washington worriers can rest easy. The men who took all the risks in the scenes were the actor, not the troops. Jeffrey Hunter, for example, almost lost his right eye in a weapon mishap.

____________________________________

Chicago American, Saturday, October 21, 1961, p. 9, c. 5:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Ray Danton, who finished working for Dick Zanuck in "The Chapman Report," flies out tomorrow to work for Darryl Zanuck in "The Longest Day" in Normandy. Ray plays Robert Mitchum's aide, an action filled part which runs thru the entire picture. Warners agreed to the loan-out because, when the shooting on "Longest Day" moves from Normandy to London, Ray will work in some personal appearances for "Majority of One," his latest Warner movie.

Going on the same plane with Ray will be Eddie Albert, who is doing a cameo bit in "Longest Day." Eddie will be there only a week. He's due in San Francisco the following Monday for a guest star part in "Reprieve."

_________________________________

Chicago American, Friday, December, 22, 1961, p. 11, c. 4:

DOROTHY KILGALLEN

. . . . Darryl Zanuck is paging Paul Newman for a part in "The Longest Day." . . .

__________________________________

Chicago Daily News, Friday, February 2, 1962, p. 10, c. 4 (with photo):

John Wayne Says Nuts

D-Day Is June in January

By Sam Lesner

June in January may be great for a song title, but big John Wayne has one word, Nuts! for romantic song writers.

January is damp and cold on the Normandy beaches and June 6, 1944, was a gray, cold day, too.

That's why Darryl F. Zanuck is making like June in January now on the beaches of Normandy where he is filming 'The Longest Day,' drama of D-Day.

With a cold in the head, and working in cotton battle fatigue uniform, it was a very long day for Wayne, too early this week when I talked with him via trans-Atlantic telephone.

It was 10:15 p.m. in Boulogne, France, where Zanuck has his production headquarters for a war drama that appears to have a whole division of film stars working in it.

Wayne now in his 32nd year as a screen actor, and a star for 21-years, is playing the role of Lieutenant Colonel Benjamin Vandervoort of the 82nd Airborne Division.

Serious and unbending, Vandervoort was respected but never liked by his men and his superiors. D-Day changed all that.

Vandervoort broke his ankle when he jumped with his men outside St. Mere Eglise. He fought through the crucial first 40 days of the invasion on his broken ankle side by side with his men. I'm playing the role with a simulated broken ankle, but the cold in the head is real, Wayne grumbled. This is unbelievable, though by the way, Zanuck has recreated in every detail the atmosphere of D-Day, Wayne said.

The two-fisted actor has re-fought most of the major campaigns of the War in the Pacific in such screen epics as "Sands of Iwo Jima," "The Fighting Seabees,"" Back to Bataan" and "They Were Expendable."

But this is his first go at World War II in the European Theater. Which war do you prefer, Wayne was asked. '____!," he replied. "You can win a war and lose the battle and I'm not aimin to lose this battle!"

That was definitive.

Wayne added that his own production, "The Alamo," is making monkeys of some critics who couldn't see it as boxoffice.

"All the investors will be paid off before I get back a dime of my money. Sure Ill produce and direct again when a story comes along that I like."

In the meantime, Wayne has added his might to the allied might of Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, Peter Lawford, Robert Wagner, Eddie Albert, Jeffrey Hunter, Paul Anka, Fabian, Tommy Sands, Edmund OBrien, Red Buttons, Ray Danton, Richard Todd and Kenneth More to win Darryl Zanuck's biggest screen battle, "The Longest Day," which promises to be the first definitive drama of D-Day.

________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Sunday, April 8, 1962, s. 1, p. 2, c. 6 (with photo) [extract]:

Burton Has A Date in Paris--With Wife

Affable and smiling, Burton flew in from Rome to do some scenes tomorrow for "The Longest Day," a film based on the D-day landings. The meeting and his wife was in contradiction of a statement by a member of his Rome entourage that such a get-together was impossible.

Table for Three

A table for three was reserved at Maxim's by Darryl Zanuck, producer of "The Longest Day." Burton appears before the cameras tomorrow as a British pilot.

Zanuck said he planned to drop in on the couple for coffee at Maxim's after the Burtons dined.

"I want to talk over his role tomorrow." Zanuck said. "But I thought they might have something to talk over before hand--so I won't join them for dinner."

The Burtons are registered at the same fashionable Paris hotel where Liz and Eddie stopped on their frequent Paris visits.

_________________________________________

Chicago Sun-Times, Sunday, June 11, 1961, s. 3, p. 3, c. 4:

MOVIES

Be A Movie Producer And See The World


By Eleanor Keen

There's definitely a change of pace as well as a change of scene in the working life of Fred Hift these days. As executive assistant to the producer, he went to Israel with Otto Preminger, when 'Exodus" was filmed. He followed this with a similar assignment, in Italy and Sicily, on "Francis of Assisi," which will be released later this year. And he leaves this week for France, where he will work with Darryl Zanuck on "The Longest Day."

As a result of all this, he is as well-informed on the techniques for restoring crumbling but priceless Italian frescoes, and life at an Israeli kibbutz, as he is on the fate of Gen. Rommel. It makes for interesting conversation.

The Longest Day is, of course, the story of D-Day and the landing on the Normandy beaches 17 years go. It was scheduled to start a month ago, but was postponed temporarily when France was shaken by the Algerian crisis. The delay gave Hift time to visit Chicago and a number of other cities across the country, before he set out again for Europe.

The picture tells the story of D-Day through the eyes of various individuals involved from the high command and the generals down to the private on the beaches. It has to do with the decisions that were made, of those that went wrong, and those that worked in our favor.

Because of the immense number of details involved, it will take a year to film (at the very least, said Hift) and when released, he added, its likely to run a minimum of three hours.

We can"t use any clips of stock shots, he explained, since we're going to photograph in color, and there are none available. Most of the shooting will be done on the Normandy beaches, of course, though we'll move to a chalet where Hitler spent the morning of D-Day asleep. We already have an English actor to play the role of Mr. Eisenhower, a truly remarkable resemblance.

____________________________

Chicago American, Saturday, December 30, 1961, p. 7, c. 7:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Another actor who received a call from Darryl was Rod Steiger, who will paly the role of Comdr. Robert O. Beer. Rod and his wife, Claire Bloom, are still in England, where they went to spend Christmas with Clair's family--so Rod remains abroad until he finishes the Zanuck epic.

_____________________________

Chicago American, Thursday, December 28, 1961:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

From winner of an art direction Oscar to actor is what has happened to Henry Grace. He leaves Jan. 9 to portray Gen. Eisenhower in "The Longest Day."

Seems Darryl Zanuck was trying to find somebody who looked like Ike and someone sent him a picture of Henry for a gag. Henry was offered the job.

__________________________________

Chicago American, Tuesday, December 5, 1961, p. 13, c. 5:

ANN MARSTERS

'Longest Day' Tells Rommel Blunder

An Incredible Blunder
by German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel contributed greatly to the tipping of the scales against Hitler.

On June 6, 1944, when the Allied invasion thundered ashore in Normandy, a private little birthday party was taking place4 in Germany.

Present were Rommel, the man in charge of Hitler's "Atlantic Wall;" Mrs. Rommel and their young son, Manfred. It was Mrs. Rommel's birthday and her husband, who had not been on leave for months, had driven eight hours from France to be with her.

Rommel had left his headquarters on June 4. The weather was terrible. Forecast indicated it would grow worse. The Field Marshall felt quite safe in making the trip home. For on thing, he believed that Gen. Eisenhower had already missed his chance to invade. Furthermore, he was convinced that if the enemy should attack it would do so only under perfect weather conditions.

There is no question the Rommel's absence from the front at the crucial moment when the invasion struck set back the German defense effort and was thus responsible, in significant measure, for the Allied triumph of D-Day.

The events of that day were set forth in Cornelius Ryan's best selling book "The Longest Day." Now they are being transferred to the screen by Producer Darryl F. Zanuck.

Fred Hift, associatd with Zanuck in the filming, now in progress in Paris, had luncheon with the Chicago critics yesterday--a purely social luncheon he said, meaning that he was not in town for the specific purpose of plugging the picture. Nevertheless, we persuaded him to talk about it.

Altho "The Longest Day," must be considered a war picture, Hift said only about 25 percent of the action deals with actual warfare.

For the rest, it deals with individual human drama of several persons involved, presenting the German as well as the Allied side.

The Rommel blunder and its consequence seems to me particularly intriguing, and mysterious, too.

The mystery lies in Rommel's hesitancy to rush back to Normandy when he was informed of the invasion. It is known that, despite the overwhelming news, he did not leave his home until many hours later. His aide, Capt. Hellmuth Lang, who accompanied him back to France, says Rommel kept repeating--""What a fool I was, what a fool I was."

Rommel knew that the battle was lost--and he was to realize very soon that, with it, the war.

Within a few weeks, the attempt on Hitler's life took place. Rommel was implicated. Two months, thereafter, Rommel was dead--forced to commit suicide with a poison capsule as two S. S. generals with drawn pistols, watched from a distance.

Werner Hinz, an important German actor, plays Rommel in "The Longest Day." His own son, Michael, plays Rommel's son, Manfred.

The 'name" stars in the cast comprise a long list that includes William Holden, Henry Fonda, Robert Mitchum, Robert Wagner, Eddie Albert, Jeffrey Hunter, and three special pets of the teenagers--Tommy Sands, Paul Anka and Fabian.

___________________________



Chicago Tribune, Tuesday, September 4, 1962, pt. 1, p. 26, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

Sal Mineo, a sensitive, talented young actor who turned in one of the best summer theater jobs of the season via O'Hare Inn theater, stopped by to tell me he turned down a quarter of a million bucks worth of guaranteed income when he decided to quit as a rock 'n' roll singer. The bit was one of those by-products of a successful young actor's career: His first disk sold over a million. TV appearances followed, etc. Why did he reject such big dough? "Because," said forthright Sal, "I'm a lousy singer! Who's kidding who?" Sal's great in Zanuck's "The Longest Day"--as a thesp. . . .

___________________________

Chicago American, Monday, October 16, 1961, p. 8, c. 6:

Sands Hams as Superman

Pointe du Hoc, France---Tommy Sands got a taste of the "Superman" feeling here during the filming of a scene of Darryl F. Zanuck's CinemaScope production, "The Longest Day."

The script called for Sands and Bob Wagner to be talking at the edge of a bomb crater when, behind them, four German soldiers emerge from a bunker. Sands was to whirl around and fire at the "enemy."

During rehearsals all went well. But when it came to film the scene, Sands' gun jammed after a single shot.

The extras playing Wehrmacht soldiers, not realizing what was happening, toppled over as arranged.

"Now that's a neat trick," laughed Tommy. "Just call me Superman and let it go at that!"

________________________________

Chicago Tribune, Monday, November 13, 1961:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

Fonda Top Choice for Preminger's 'Cardinals'


by Hedda Hopper

New York, Nov. 12---Henry Fonda has a schedule that would fell an ox, but he always did thrive on hard work, so I guess he's happy. It's almost a certainty that he will do the movie, "The Cardinals," for Otto Preminger next spring. At the same time he'll be starring on Broadway in his new play, "A Gift of Time." Fonda has just wound up a couple of films; he flew to Paris to play in "The Longest Day." He'll return here to tape "The Good Years" with Lucille Ball for television and flies to California to put "Henry Fonda Presents the Family" on TV tape. Then it's back to New York to start rehearsals on the play. Incidentally, the whole Fonda clan--Hank, his daughter, Jane, and his son Peter--posed for a magazine cover. . . . Robert Taylor and Edmond O'Brien join Fonda in Europe to do Cameo roles in "The Longest Day." Darryl Zanuck has lined up 15 top star names, which should set some kind of record.

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Chicago Tribune,Saturday, October 21, 1961, p. 4:

Under Fire, U.S. Cuts Film Troops to 250

Paris, Oct. 20---The United States defense department, under criticism for providing battle troops for filming a movie, today cut from 700 to 250 the number of GIs who will be brought from West Germany to Normandy on Monday when shooting of the movie starts.

A spokesman for the United States European army command headquarters said merely that by defense department directive only 250 troop of the United States 8th Infantry division would be placed at the disposal of Darryl Zanuck, producer of the movie, "The Longest Day."

Earlier this week, a spokesman for the command said 700 troops would be involved and that the Pentagon had approved Zanuck's request for that many to make an amphibious assault on the same Normandy beachhead where allied invaders stormed ashore on June 6, 1944.

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[same], Monday, October 23, 1961, p. 9:

GIs Shifted To Movie Site In Normandy

Baumholder, Germany, Oct. 22 (UPI)---Seven hundred troops of the U.S. 8th infantry division left by train today for maneuvers and movie making on the beaches of Normandy, France.

An 8th division spokesman said the maneuvers were shifted from a site in Germany to France because Darryl Zanuck, the film maker, has agreed to pay the entire cost of the move.

"It won't cost the American taxpayers a penny," he said. The film, "The Longest Day," portrays landings in World War II.

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Chicago Tribune, Sunday, September 10, 1961, s. 1, p. 2, c. 6:

MOVIE JOB ENDS

Heidelberg, Germany, Sept. 9 (UPI)---The last of 130 United States army Rangers returned tonight from two grueling weeks of acting on a Normandy beachhead for a Hollywood movie team.

The troops, members of the 2nd battle group, 6th infantry, 8th division, were from the same division that has a battle group in West Berlin.

Traveled 400 Miles

Lt. Col. Roger J. Bligh, public information officer of the 8th infantry division in Bad Kreuznach, Germany, said the Rangers traveled 400 miles to Normandy as part of prearranged maneuvers. A European army headquarters spokesman here said they coincided with the filming of "The Longest Day" by Darryl Zanuck, Hollywood producer.

Bligh said the Ranges were in constant telephone contact with headquarters in Bad Kreuznach, which is standard practice when a detachment is away for training.

Tells of Request

The Heidelberg spokesman said the Zanuck request from 20th Century Fox studios was received some time ago. According to army regulations, he said, if the division has a parade or maneuvers already scheduled and a movie company wants to film it, they can.

"This film is a momentous thing, with the army, air force, and navy taking part," he said.

"According to existing regulations, if the movie company request meet the criteria of the defense department, we can go ahead and do it." he said.

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Chicago Sun-Times, Sunday, December 10, 1961, s. 3, p. 3, c. 3:

MOVIES

'Day' Has 3 Months To Go


by Eleanor Keen

Several months ago Fred Hift came to town from Europe to talk about "St. Francis of Assisi." Last week he was back to tell us about "The Longest Day," which still has three months to go before it is completed.

As producer Darryl Zanuck's quiet-spoken assistant, Hift commutes from Paris to London to New York to Hollywood to Chicago to assorted other European capitals. Few films--"Ben-Hur" is an exception--have had as much publicity during their production as the one that currently concerns Hift. It is, as you probably know the story of D-Day re-enacted for the cameras by Zanuck with the help of U.S. soldiers, and Frenchmen in German uniform. It is based on Cornelius Ryan's best seller--and staging it has involved almost as much commotion as a small-sized war.

There Was a near riot one night in the village of Ste. Maire Eglise, when French extras wearing Nazi uniforms were marched into the village square by the German who was in charge of rehearsing them. For the first time since occupation troops had left, villagers were seeing German soldiers, they thought, and nobody like it.

At Pointe du Hoc, atop a 100-foot cliff, the troupe found the field green and peaceful--and to restore its ugly horror, scorched it with flame throwers and pitted it with exploding shells.

They Moved to Corsica, where the U.S. 6th Fleet was holding maneuvers, and where 25 big ships were assembled, in order to film part of the battle scenes. "It was the only way we could have found so many ships," said Hift. U.S. Marines---1600 of them--subsequently landed on the Corsican reconstruction of Omaha Beach.

They Flew to Sicily to look for Spitfires, found them in Belgium. They exploded Messerschmitt's in the sky and they wrecked a train, an authentic old locomotive that went up in a fine blaze. They entertained British, French and American visitors who had been on Omaha Beach on D-Day--and a European reporter who complained when he noted that the dead, lying face down in the water at the edge of the beach, were only dummies. "What do you want us to do?" asked HIft. "Do you want us to shoot them before we film the scene?"

The picture--its interior scenes--will be finished in Hollywood. It has a big cast headed by Robert Mitchum, Kenneth More, William Holden, Peter Lawford, Richard Todd and Henry Fonda.

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Chicago Sun-Times, Sunday, December 10, 1961, s. 3, p. 3, c. 3:

MOVIES

'Day' Has 3 Months To Go


by Eleanor Keen

[Extracted]

They Moved to Corsica, where the U.S. 6th Fleet was holding maneuvers, and where 25 big ships were assembled, in order to film part of the battle scenes. "It was the only way we could have found so many ships," said Hift. U.S. Marines---1600 of them--subsequently landed on the Corsican reconstruction of Omaha Beach.

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, November 13, 1961:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

by Hedda Hopper

. . . . Robert Taylor and Edmond O'Brien join Fonda in Europe to do Cameo roles in "The Longest Day." Darryl Zanuck has lined up 15 top star names, which should set some kind of record.

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Chicago Tribune, Monday, October 15, 1962, s. 1, p. 26, c. 1:

TOWER TICKER

by Herb Lyon

. . . . Biggest kick for Producer Darryl Zanuck is the news that 98 per cent of the multitude of advance ticket buyers for his "Longest Day" picture [at the Roosevelt] are women. It's the stirring story of D-day, and Zanuck feared it might only be a "man's movie." . . . . .

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[same], Friday, November 23, 1962:

Every audience cheers at the conclusion of D. Zanuck's stirring tribute to Yankee Doodles and freedom--"The Longest Day," at the Roosevelt. . . .

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Chicago Tribune, Tuesday, March 13, 1962, s. 2, p. 5, c. 4:

LOOKING AT HOLLYWOOD

Problems in Making D-day Film Epic Told


by Hedda Hopper

Hollywood, March 12---

"Lining Up an international star cast was only one of many problems," Zanuck continued. "We had to get actors when armies and military equipment were available. American rangers and United States troops from Germany came only when it didn't interfere with training schedules. This was true of British commandos and Royal marines and, to a far greater extent of French troops. I didn't want to use the process of double exposures, so many actors are in the actual scenes with the troops when they came ashore. At the same time and place, I had to have Bob Mitchum, Jeff Hunter, Eddie Albert, Ray Danton, Peter Lawford, and Kenneth More. John Wayne is in eight episodes, two with Bob Ryan, as well as Stu Whitman, Steve Forrest, ad Tom Tryon. Richard Beymer had to be in sequences with Sal Mineo and Red Buttons, and the latter with Richard Burton, Robert Wagner, Paul Anka, Fabian, and Tommy Sands are together in two episodes.

"Henry Fonda had a key spot with Edmond O'Brien and Curt Jurgens was tied in with Gerd Froebe, Werner Hinz, and Peter Van Eyck, all important German stars," Zanuck said. "Richard Todd and Sean Connery were together, and Leo Genn had three episodes with Mel Ferrer. Roddy McDowell had to be on hand when we could get the United States rangers and Rod Steiger. It was the same thing with the French actors. We spent 2 millions for major talent; not including the extras. . . . There were a few bad ankles and legs from parachute jumps and sprains and bruises in battle scenes, but no one was seriously injured."

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Chicago Daily News, Tuesday, December 6, 1961, p.32, c. 2:

'Longest Day' Recreated--After 17 Years

Panic At D-Day Filming


by Sam Lesner

Movie realism can open old wounds, Producer Darryl Zanuck learned as he prepared to shoot a scene for "The Longest Day" on location in the Normandy village of Ste. Mere Eglise.

Zanuck's film, dealing with D-Day, the most fateful day of World War II, currently is in production on the Normandy beaches and in the villages and towns that were in the direct line of fire from both the Allied guns and the Germans who had dub in to repel the invasion.

Fred Hift, executive assistant to Darryl Zanuck on the production, visited here Monday to talk about some of the less publicized problems connected with the film.

The film has become controversial because Zanuck used American troops stationed in Europe as D-Day "actors."

The Jack Paar incident in Berlin triggered much of the criticism of Zanuck.

The scene in Ste. Mere Iglese called for a company of Nazi soldiers to parade through the village square, Hift reported.

But before the scene was completed Zanuck had a near-riot on his hands.

The agony of their ordeal by fire and Nazi cruelty still was too fresh in the minds of the village inhabitants 17 years after D-Day.

Zanuck hurriedly sent sound trucks through the village.

"It's only a movie, please do not be alarmed!" the loud speakers blared.

Hift reported that the French were less painfully reminded of the devastating war when it came time to recreate the foxholes, hedgerow trenches and bomb craters that pock-marked the Normandy farm lands and pastures.

The 17-year growth had all but concealed the ravages of war.

What to do?

Zanuck's technical experts studied the problem then called for flame-throwers and again denuded the areas needed for the sequences.

They even re-bombed the bomb craters that had filled up over the years.

The French were delighted.

The beaches and the tremendous cemeteries nearby (the casualties were buried where they fell) have become war memorials and tourist attractions.

But nature is persistent in trying to conceal the wounds of war. The flame-throwers solved the problem for the next three or four years.

Production will continue until next March.

"We hope we can keep it screen realism" said Hift as he scanned the latest headlines from Berlin.

Chicago Sun-Times, Wednesday, December 13, 1961, p. 62, c. 1:

KUP'S COLUMN

You think, maybe, the armies of the world have but one responsibility, to defend the precious soil of their native lands?

Then you haven't reckoned with the persuasive charms of the motion picture industry. One of the more recent trends in the movie-making business is "renting" armies. The soldiers come fully equipped and trained and are far less costly than hiring and rehearsing movie extras. We're prompted to bring this to your attention by the use of regular armies in such movies as "The Longest Day" and "El Cid."

Many Persons Were Surprised that the Pentagon had given Darryl Zanuck permission to use regular military personnel and equipment in filming "The Longest Day." Our government's policy, apparently, is to provide such personnel it the movie is in the best interests of the nation. "Longest Day," the story of D-Day, written by Cornelius Ryan, apparently qualifies. Zanuck, as producer, has to defray whatever costs are involved in transporting, housing and feeding the troops he uses. He reportedly has expended $300,000 for this purpose, which is peanuts compared to what his costs would be in hiring, training and equipping a similar number of actors.

The British Army is Available for movies, too, but on another basis. The producer must provide the same pay for each soldier that an actor would get and this sum goes into the British Army's benevolent fund. This discourages producers from making too frequent use of the army. The French Army also is for rent, but its policy is similar to the British, hence you don't see much of this one on the screen, either. Zanuck probably is the first producer who was able to make deals for all three armies--U.S., British and French--in "The Longest Day."

South American Armies also are frequently employed in movies. Once upon a time these were comic-opera armies, available for a few pesos slipped under the table to a revolutionary general, always temporarily in command. Times have changed somewhat. When United Artists decided to film "Taras Bulba," starring Tony Curtis, in Argentina, the studio learned it would cost the equivalent of $7 per man per day for the use of the army. The studio didn't mind the fee, but when the soldiers stopped whatever they were doing promptly at 4:45 p.m. because that was the end of their normal day, the studio realized it was in for trouble. But little did they realize what trouble was ahead. The soldier-actors were called off the movie for 11 days because of a general strike in Argentina. The studio reportedly ordered the army to settle the strike and return to movie-making--or else.

There Are Other Armies that not only come cheaper to movie producers, but actually seek the work. Yugoslavia's army, for instance. A number of Hollywood producers shot their movies in Yugoslavia largely because the army was available, at little or no cost. Any producer in need of five or six thousand soldiers would leap at the offer. The Greek Army, too, is available and willing. In fact, the Greek Army was outstanding in "Lion of Sparta," one of the finest performances by an army. Seldom has an army been so brave.

One of the Most popular armies, for moviemaking thiat is, is Spain's. The colorful uniforms are especially dear to the hearts of the producers. And the Spanish Army, ever willing to oblige, will do something no other army will do. Their soldiers will don enemy uniforms. That's what they did for Samuel Bronston, producer of "El Cid," starring Charlton Heston. All that the Spanish soldiers demanded for portraying the enemy was a little more money than for playing themselves. In this case, Bronston crossed their palms with a few extra pesetas and he had two armies.

Our only fear is that Hollywood may now add an Oscar for the best acting army.

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Chicago Tribune, Thursday, September 14, 1961, p. 2 [extract]:

GIs In Germany Used to Make Film in France

Pentagon Explains: for Friend of Norstad


Washington, Sept. 14 (AP)---A Republican spokesman asked the Pentagon today to explain why Germany-based United States troops had been used as props for he filming of a commercial movie in France.

The reply: The defense department responded to a request from Gen. Lauris Norstad, commander in chief of United States forces in Europe, who asked cooperation with a film producer friend.

However, Pentagon officials said they were sure that Norstad did not make the request because the producer was a friend of his but because the general believed the cooperation in the making of a historical film would be a good thing for the military.

150 Used for 11 Days

The request for an explanation came from Rep. Bob Wilson [R., Cal.], who is chairman of the Republican congressional committee and a member of the House armed services committee.

Wilson said 150 troops were diverted to France for 11 days to participate in a movie version of "The Longest Day," an account of D day of World War II. He said the troops were drawn from the same division which now has troops stationed in West Berlin.

[Arthur] Sylvester gave this background to the army's connection with "The Longest Day."

Late in 1960, Darryl Zanuck, the producer, wrote to Norstad enlisting his support for making the film. Norstad recommended to the defense department that the support be given.

The department concurred in Norstad's proposal for "military cooperation with Gen. Norstad's friend, Darryl Zanuck."

Sylvester said that "so far as I know" there has been no cost to the government for the use of troops in the movie filming.

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Chicago American, Thursday, August 31, 1961, p. 33, c. 5:

LOUELLA O. PARSONS

Our young Americans in Caen, France, working in Darryl Zanuck's motion picture, "The Longest Day," took time out to celebrate Tommy Sands 24th birthday. Darryl, Bob Wagner, Paul Anka, Fabian, Red Buttons, and Zanuck's new discovery, Irina Demich were all there.

Tommy's attractive wife, Nancy Sinatra, gave him fitted luggage.

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Indianapolis Star, Saturday. October 9, 2004:

Irina Demich

Obituary

Irina Demich, 67, Avon, died October 8, 2004 She was an actress. Services will be at 10 a.m. Monday, October 11, 2004 in St. Malachy Catholic Church, Brownsburg, In. Calling: none. Survivors include daughters Maria-Emanuela Bretherick, Avon, IN, Deborah Wahl, Rome, Italy; grandson Jordan Bretherick. Arrangements by Conkle Funeral Home, Avon Chapel.

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