Lawrence of Arabia
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 115 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


The top 20 underappreciated films of 1986

26 August 2015 11:10 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

From thrillers to sci-fi to horror, here's our pick of 20 films from 1986 that surely deserve a bit more love...

A fascinating year for film, 1986. It was a time when a glossy, expensive movie about handsome men in planes could dominate the box-office, sure (that would be Top Gun). But it was also a year when Oliver Stone went off with just $6m and came back with Platoon, one of the biggest hits of the year both financially and in terms of accolades. It was also a period when the British movie industry was briefly back on its feet, resulting in a new golden age of great films - one or two of them are even on this list.

As ever, there were certain films that, despite their entertainment value or genuine brilliance in terms of movie making, somehow managed to slip through the net. So to redress the balance a little, »

- ryanlambie

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Film Review: 'Theeb'

20 August 2015 12:50 AM, PDT | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★☆ "Only two kinds of creature get fun in the desert. Bedouins and gods", the exquisitely cynical diplomat Mr. Dryden (Claude Rains) tells T.E. Lawrence (Peter O'Toole) in David Lean's Lawrence of Arabia (1962), "and you're neither." He could have added a third category of desert tourists: directors. The desert is a supremely photogenic location and filmmakers as diverse as Bernardo Bertolucci, George Lucas and Anthony Minghella have all basked on the shifting sands and now Brit-born Abu Nowar joins their ranks with Theeb (2014). It's 1916 and the world is at war but that feels very remote to Theeb (Jacir Eid), a young Bedouin who lives with his brother Hussein (Hussein Salameh) and his tribe.

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- CineVue UK

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Mitchum Stars in TCM Movie Premiere Set Among Japanese Gangsters Directed by Future Oscar Winner

12 August 2015 10:44 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Robert Mitchum ca. late 1940s. Robert Mitchum movies 'The Yakuza,' 'Ryan's Daughter' on TCM Today, Aug. 12, '15, Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” series is highlighting the career of Robert Mitchum. Two of the films being shown this evening are The Yakuza and Ryan's Daughter. The former is one of the disappointingly few TCM premieres this month. (See TCM's Robert Mitchum movie schedule further below.) Despite his film noir background, Robert Mitchum was a somewhat unusual choice to star in The Yakuza (1975), a crime thriller set in the Japanese underworld. Ryan's Daughter or no, Mitchum hadn't been a box office draw in quite some time; in the mid-'70s, one would have expected a Warner Bros. release directed by Sydney Pollack – who had recently handled the likes of Jane Fonda, Barbra Streisand, and Robert Redford – to star someone like Jack Nicholson or Al Pacino or Dustin Hoffman. »

- Andre Soares

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The Forgotten: Richard Lester's "Juggernaut" (1974)

12 August 2015 5:41 PM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Inspired by the Richard Lester retrospective at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, August 7-13.When the great Omar Sharif died recently, the BBC's coverage of the sad event included clips from Lawrence of Arabia and Dr. Zhivago, of course, and then cut to Richard Lester's Juggernaut just as the voice-over commented on the declining quality of Sharif's later films, causing me to splutter into my cocoa and pen angry letters to Auntie Beeb in my mind, for Juggernaut is a fantastic example of seventies British cinema. It's what I remember seventies Britain being like. The Christmas scene in Ken Russell's Tommy has the same effect on me, but that's because I was a kid in the seventies.Brown and orange color schemes, older men with long hair, and grim political discussions that went over my head but seemed to portend explosive doom: that was the United Kingdom in Ad 1974. In Juggernaut, »

- David Cairns

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Amy Grimehouse is Secret Cinema's trashy, drag-loving cousin

11 August 2015 7:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - TV News | See recent The Guardian - TV News news »

The underground movie night specialises in camp screenings and immersive events, from Tudor drag balls to doggy assault courses. Just don’t be surprised if a raw fish lands on you

There are a few things you might not expect to experience during a trip to the cinema: having raw fish thrown in your direction, being instructed to deface a children’s colouring book, or fashioning your own sex toy out of vegetables. This is par for the course, though, at London-based event and club night Amy Grimehouse, and if you don’t take part, a drag-queen compere will tell you off.

Now in its fifth year, Amy Grimehouse was early to marry three of the city’s most pervasive event trends: drag performances, immersive theatre and an improvised, pop-up feel. A ticket gets you entrance to a campy film screening: previous nights have centred on The Rocky Horror Picture Show, »

- Amelia Abraham

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Amy Grimehouse is Secret Cinema's trashy, drag-loving cousin

11 August 2015 7:50 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

The underground movie night specialises in camp screenings and immersive events, from Tudor drag balls to doggy assault courses. Just don’t be surprised if a raw fish lands on you

There are a few things you might not expect to experience during a trip to the cinema: having raw fish thrown in your direction, being instructed to deface a children’s colouring book, or fashioning your own sex toy out of vegetables. This is par for the course, though, at London-based event and club night Amy Grimehouse, and if you don’t take part, a drag-queen compere will tell you off.

Now in its fifth year, Amy Grimehouse was early to marry three of the city’s most pervasive event trends: drag performances, immersive theatre and an improvised, pop-up feel. A ticket gets you entrance to a campy film screening: previous nights have centred on The Rocky Horror Picture Show, »

- Amelia Abraham

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Theeb Review: “A cinematic delight”

11 August 2015 3:35 AM, PDT | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Theeb review: A cinematic delight. Theeb is exquisite, intriguing and downright thought provoking. Theeb review

As the First World War rapidly approaches Theeb’s forgotten corner of the Ottoman Empire, a Bedouin tribe is slowly adjusting to the changes brought upon them following the death of their respected Sheikh. It’s a subdued, yet tightly framed portrait of tribal life seen through the youthful eyes of the Sheikh’s youngest and ignorantly unskillful son, Theeb (Jacir Eid Al-Hwietat).

Turning to his middle brother Hussein (Hussein Salameh Al-Sweilhiyeen) for guidance and attention, Cinematographer Wolfgang Thaler paints an exquisitely beautiful image of Bedouin culture as Hussein patiently teaches Theeb the nuances of nomadic life: tracking, hunting, finding water and the duty of Dakheel. The images are heightened by the natural, intimate relationship between Hussein and Theeb, no doubt in part due to, their real-life familial relationship as cousins.

The quiet beauty conjured »

- Sacha Hall

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Remembering the First and Only Arab World Movie Star Known Around the Globe

23 July 2015 9:10 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Omar Sharif in 'Doctor Zhivago.' Egyptian star Omar Sharif, 'The Karate Kid' producer Jerry Weintraub: Brief career recaps A little late in the game – and following the longish Theodore Bikel article posted yesterday – below are brief career recaps of a couple of film veterans who died in July 2015: actor Omar Sharif and producer Jerry Weintraub. A follow-up post will offer an overview of the career of peplum (sword-and-sandal movie) actor Jacques Sernas, whose passing earlier this month has been all but ignored by the myopic English-language media. Omar Sharif: Film career beginnings in North Africa The death of Egyptian film actor Omar Sharif at age 83 following a heart attack on July 10 would have been ignored by the English-language media (especially in the U.S.) as well had Sharif remained a star within the Arabic-speaking world. After all, an "international" star is only worth remembering »

- Andre Soares

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Watch: "The Art of the Opening Shot" Highlights 'Star Wars', 'The Dark Knight', 'Lawrence of Arabia' and More

23 July 2015 2:59 PM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

"You never get a second chance to make a first impression," or so the saying goes, and sometimes with a film all it takes is one scene or perhaps even a single shot to draw viewers into a film. An opening shot often sets the tone for the rest of the story, something one YouTuber examines in the video below. More of a tribute video than a true video essay, the extended montage explores the art of the opening shot using clips from esteemed classics 2001: A Space Odyssey, Apocalypse Now, Lawrence of Arabia and Star Wars as well as more modern fare, too, including clips from The Dark Knight, No Country for Old Men and Stoker. Go ahead, check out the video below and see if you can spot which clips are from which films, and then take to the comments and let us know which films impress you »

- Jordan Benesh

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Watch: Video Essay Counts Down The 10 Most Beautiful Movies Of All Time

22 July 2015 9:05 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

It’s impossible to create a list on the internet, especially when it comes to movies, without starting a hotly contested debate. And while CineFix's “Top 10 Most Beautiful Movies of All-Time” will certainly stir some arguments, they shy away from making it a definitive ranking, instead breaking things down into ten different categories. Read More: 20 Visually Stunning Movies That Go For Broke Some of the categories include: European cinema, black-and-white in the modern era, Asian cinema, sweeping Hollywood epics, etc. Altogether, the aim is to pick a movie that’s purely a representation of cinematic beauty, whether it’s the striking 70mm desert imagery of “Lawrence of Arabia,” the deep focus cinematography of “Citizen Kane,” or the decadent use of color in “Hero.” It’s not so much about how the cinematography services the movie. They’re instead picking movies that would look like a masterful painting if you pressed the pause button. »

- Ken Guidry

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Nerd Alert: Batman Vs Dayman, Super Mario Honest Trailer and More

21 July 2015 12:11 PM, PDT | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

Welcome to today's edition of Nerd Alert, where we have all the quirky, nerdy news that you crave in one convenient spot. What do we have in store for you on this terrific Tuesday? Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice's new trailer gets mashed up with It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, Iron Man takes to the streets of Los Santos in Grand Theft Auto V and Real Fake History examines Little Mac's legend in Mike Tyson's Punch Out. Not enough for you? Then check out Game of Thrones' 8-bit death scenes and the most beautiful movies in cinematic history. Oh, and we have the Super Mario Bros. honest trailer you've been waiting for since 1993! So, sit back, relax and check out all that today's Nerd Alert has to offer.

Batman v Superman and It's Always Sunny Mashup

Just a few weeks ago at Comic-Con, Warner Bros. unveiled the »

- MovieWeb

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Scream Factory Set To Unleash Sam Elliot-led shocker The Legacy This September

20 July 2015 5:22 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

2015 has already been a good year for DVD/Bluray releases from the gang at Scream Factory, with many new and old titles being released quite regularly. Everything from Tobe Hooper’s Invaders From Mars to the upcoming special feature-heavy Bluray of Wes Craven’s The People Under The Stairs, Sf have given genre fans exactly what they’ve asked for. While those fan favorites are awesome and are most definitely worth picking up, the films I’m excited for the most, are the somewhat forgotten gems that Scream Factory are set to unleash, like the Pierce Brosnan-led Nomads and the subject of this announcement, the 1978 Sam Elliot film The Legacy. The film, which also stars Katherine Ross and The Who’s Roger Daltrey in supporting roles, and was directed by Return Of The Jedi director Richard Marquand is hitting Bluray on September 15th, complete with new special features as well. »

- Jerry Smith

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The Legacy Blu-ray Release Details & Cover Art

20 July 2015 2:24 PM, PDT | DailyDead | See recent DailyDead news »

Scream Factory has detailed their plans for the Blu-ray release of The Legacy, revealing the list of bonus features and the fact that this this will be a new HD transfer from the inter-positive:

"It is a birthright of the living death...Scream Factory proudly presents the Blu-ray debut of The Legacy on September 15, 2015. This release comes complete with a new HD transfer and bonus features, including new interviews with film editor Anne V. Coates and special effects artist Robin Grantham.

How far would you go to inherit everlasting life? When Margaret (Katharine Ross, The Stepford Wives) and her boyfriend Pete (Sam Elliot, Frogs, Road House) have a car accident in the English countryside, the other driver offers to take them to his lavish country estate to make amends. But once there, they are surprised to learn that all of the other houseguests are already expecting them! It's not long »

- Jonathan James

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'Mockingbird' Film’s Scout on Atticus Finch: "He’s About Justice"

20 July 2015 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

In 1962, Mary Badham was a nine-year-old girl plucked from among 200 contenders by Universal Studios to star as Scout opposite Gregory Peck’s Atticus Finch in the film adaptation of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. Mockingbird would go on to earn eight Oscar nominations, including best picture (it lost to Lawrence of Arabia), best actor for Peck, who won, and best supporting actress for Badham (she lost to 16-year-old Patty Duke in The Miracle Worker). “When the film came out in 1962, I got an Oscar nomination,” says Badham today. “I don’t think my brother

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- Bill Higgins

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Sos This Week #16: Filling In The Blanks

19 July 2015 10:01 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

It seems like every movie franchise is expanding with sequels, prequels, and anthology films. Every character must be explained and every moment must be felt for us to truly know it happened. We take a look at some of the upcoming prequels, such as the Han Solo solo film that The Lego Movie directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller are directing, and why it may not be entirely necessary to have these films that focus on the details of characters that we learned to love without much explanation.

Top Stories:

Sdcc 2015: First teaser for ‘Suicide Squad’ shows the whole team (and briefly Batman)

Sdcc 2015: New trailer for ‘Batman v. Superman’ shows why the two heroes are clashing

Sdcc 2015: ‘Deadpool’ was the Marvel showstopper at Comic Con

Watch the first trailer for David O. Russell’s next feature ‘Joy

Hayao Miyazaki creates an animated short after retiring from »

- Zach Dennis

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50th Karlovy Vary: A quick chat with Anca Damian, director of ‘The Magic Mountain’

17 July 2015 12:41 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Four years ago, in 2011, the Romanian director Anca Damian first made herself widely known to the international film community by presenting her animated feature Crulic at the Locarno film festival. Based on a true story of Claudiu Crulic that has gained a lot of publicity in 2008, the film consists of a mix of techniques including hand-drawn animation and animated photographs. They are of Crulic’s personal possessions – that he kept while imprisoned in a Polish prison after being arrested for theft, although he had supposedly been in Italy at the time. A Romanian citizen, Crulic sought help from the Romanian consul and went on a hunger strike after his requests were dismissed. The signs of his deteriorating health have been dismissed and he finally died from starvation four months later.

Reality keeps intruding into Damian’s animations – and while in Crulic, it was the things the real, historic Claudiu Crulic kept, »

- Tina Poglajen

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From Sade to sheer sadism | Letters

12 July 2015 11:38 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Following Giles Fraser’s excellent article (Money is the only God Tories want us to worship on a Sunday, 11 July), may I propose that we now rebrand as Sunday as “a day of contentment”. This would not only emphasise the benefits of connecting to and enjoying the natural world and the company of friends and family, but also provide an opportunity to truly enjoy, use and benefit from the material possessions we already have. This might also provide a useful antidote to the commercial pressures which build a constant sense of wanting things that we don’t need and of needing things that we don’t want.

Dr Steve Williams

Guisborough, North Yorkshire

Peter Bradshaw rightly refers to Omar Sharif’s appearance in Lawrence of Arabia as “one of the greatest entrances in movie history” (Report, 11 July). However, that famous scene also has the distinction of being the only one »

- Letters

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Omar Sharif Remembered: From Egypt to Hollywood, a Chameleon of the Screen

11 July 2015 11:26 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

There is a shot in “Doctor Zhivago” in which Omar Sharif’s face is almost entirely veiled in shadow, so that all we see are his eyes, focused on the woman who will soon become his lover. For all the visual sweep of David Lean’s magnificently mushy 1965 romance, it contains few images as telling or revealing as this one: Here were eyes for the audience to lose itself in, but also to study closely. The film historian and professor Constantine Santas summed it up in his appreciative 2011 study of Lean’s epics, when he wrote that Sharif’s Zhivago “is frequently described as ‘passive,’ his eyes reflecting the reality he sees in reaction shots; his eyes then become the mirror of reality we ourselves see.”

It’s a conceit that could only work, of course, if your leading man had the eyes to do it justice. And Lean, the »

- Justin Chang

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Omar Sharif: Arab World Mourns its Favorite Son of Cinema

11 July 2015 8:51 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The passing of Omar Sharif on Friday saw instant heartache emanate from across the cinema world and beyond. One of the last great male icons from Hollywood’s golden age – the suave, dark-eyed and dashingly handsome gent who sent hearts racing in Doctor Zhivago, Funny Girl and numerous others – had gone. But from Egypt and the wider Middle East, there was distinctly more emotional outpouring. For Sharif, ever since his first arrival on Western cinema screens as a barely discernable speck through the heat thermals of the Jordanian desert in Lawrence of Arabia, represented the Arab world on

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- Alex Ritman

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Rip Omar Sharif, star of ‘Lawrence of Arabia’, ‘Doctor Zhivago’, and an elegant romancer

10 July 2015 5:08 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Omar Sharif, the international film star famed for roles in Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago, has passed away of a heart attack at the age of 83, leaving behind a limelight legacy rivaling any of Hollywood’s favorite leading men.

Born in Alexandria, Egypt as Michel Demitri Shalhoub, Sharif changed his name as a young university graduate landing his first film roles in his native country. In what seemed like no time for the life of a beginning actor, Sharif—in part due to his famous good looks—soon gained traction in the world of film, but also in the tabloid press, converting to Islam and marrying co-star and Egyptian actress Faten Hamama in 1955. These trysts with female leads, however, would continue during their marriage, and Sharif’s flirtations would soon become almost as notable as his films.

Still, Sharif’s screen presence won out when his first English-language film »

- Staff

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 115 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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