Lawrence of Arabia
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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 90 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


PopWatch Confessional: Which classic (or 'classic') film have you never seen?

24 October 2014 11:07 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

The Terminator was released 30 years ago this weekend—but our Hillary Busis hadn’t seen it until this past week. (Of course, she's not alone; everyone has at least one shameful gap in their pop cultural knowledge. So we opened up the question to our staffers: What’s a classic (or "classic") film that you’ve missed? Read through our choices—and feel free to chime in with your own. Kyle Ryan, EW.com editor: It won Best Picture in 1962 and is No. 7 on the AFI's "100 best films" list, but not only have I never seen Lawrence of Arabia, I »

- EW staff

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The 'Star Wars' Effect: Why Hollywood Is Hot on Abu Dhabi

19 October 2014 10:27 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This story first appeared in the Oct. 24 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine.  When rumors first surfaced earlier in the year that Star Wars: Episode VII would be shooting in the Middle East, most eyes in the region turned to Jordan. After all, the country had provided the sand-strewn backdrop for a slew of major titles dating back to 1962's Lawrence of Arabia, most recently including Prometheus, Zero Dark Thirty, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen and the upcoming Exodus: Gods and Kings. Also, unlike Tunisia, which famously stood in for the Skywalkers' dusty home planet of Tatooine in the previous installments, Jordan was a country that hadn't been

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- Alex Ritman

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Naji Abu Nowar: Q&A With Variety’s Arab Filmmaker of the Year

16 October 2014 10:00 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Even before Naji Abu Nowar took home the director prize at the 2014 Venice Horizons section, his feature debut, “Theeb,” was one of the most talked-about films on the Lido. Born in Oxford and educated in Jordan and the U.K., Nowar has helped spotlight Jordan — not for outside crews seeking spectacular locations but for local talent telling local stories. “Theeb” is a stunning, intimate epic set in a Bedouin community during the Arab Revolt (the same period as “Lawrence of Arabia”), presenting a society on the cusp of change and tipping its hat to classic Westerns even in the way it toys with questions of moral absolutes.

Nowar is the latest recipient of Variety’s Arab Filmmaker of the Year award at the Abu Dhabi Film Festival.

How does the label Arab filmmaker help you and how does it hold you back?

I’ve been half-half my whole life! In »

- Jay Weissberg

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Restoration & Archive: a clean slate

13 October 2014 9:58 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Opportunities are opening up to restore classic assets on new formats - but film restoration is an art form in danger. Ann-Marie Corvin reports from Screen International and Broadcast’s Restoration & Archive Forum

“If there’s been a gold rush in film archive then it’s kind of passed me by,” says Paul Collard, vice-president of film and digital services at film processing company Deluxe Digital.

While there have been a few showcase renewals in the Us, such as Sony’s 4K restoration of David Lean’s 1962 classic Lawrence Of Arabia, the main drivers for restoration of archive in Europe are commercial - the Blu-ray sell-through market and broadcasters looking to release TV classics on new distribution formats - or cultural, from national institutions and trusts that find the money to achieve a handful of significant projects.

Deluxe, for example, recently completed full Digital Intermediates (Di) restoration of the 1927 silent film The Battles Of The Coronel And Falkland »

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Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

11 October 2014 5:32 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus, »

- Andre Soares

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Spe Titles to Launch on Hikari TV 4K

9 October 2014 2:40 AM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

Tokyo — Sony is to begin supplying VoD content to Hikari TV 4K, a channel run by Ntt Plala serving Japanese viewers with 4K TV receivers.

Among the 25 Sony Pictures Entertainment titles initially on offer will be “The Amazing Spider-Man 2,” “Elysium,” “After Earth,” “Men In Black,” and “Lawrence of Arabia.”

The end of year start of the service is timed close to the release of several Sony 4K products, include eight Bravia 4K TV models. 

In Japan 4K broadcasting is rapidly moving from the experimental channel launched in June by the NexTV-f (Next Generation Television & Broadcasting Promotion Forum) organization to full commercialization.

Cable and satellite broadcaster acTVila will debut a rival 4K service in February, followed in March by the bow of Sky Perfect-jsat platform’s 4K premium channel. 

Sony is hoping these will spur a healthy uptick in sales for its long-ailing TV set manufacturing division.     

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- Mark Schilling

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138 days til Oscar: That's your Best Picture length!

7 October 2014 6:31 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

138 is a magic number. It's the average length, in minutes, of a Best Picture winner. Here are the running times of all winnners from longest to shortest. You'll see that the majority of winners are over 2 hours long which has caused no end of padding in "serious" movies but alas, not enough padding for tender buttocks watching the interminable movies. 

Here are your Best Picture winners from longest film to the shortest.

Gone With the Wind (1939) 238 minutes

Just two minutes shy of four hours, but worth every second. Lots of Gone With the Wind discussion here. Did you see its recent two day theatrical screening? Lawrence of Arabia (1962) 216 minutes Ben-Hur (1959) 212 minutes

Currently in the process of being remade because that's how Hollywood do. Although this film was itself a remake so... we'll let it pass. Still there is no way its signature scene, the chariot race, will be as thrilling with CGI. »

- NATHANIEL R

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How Jay Leno and Other Stars Make Money From Motorcycles, Vases and Other Oddities

5 October 2014 1:00 PM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

This story first appeared in the Oct. 10 issue of The Hollywood Reporter magazine. Back in the 1990s, Jay Leno splurged on another motorcycle to add to his collection -- six more of them, in fact. He paid more than $30,000 apiece for a sextet of 1929 Brough bikes, the very model that Lawrence of Arabia died on. This year, a Brough sold for a record $379,202. "That's a pretty good return," says Leno. "There are a lot of ways to make money besides the stock market." Read more Hollywood Salaries Revealed, From Movie Stars to Agents

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- THR Staff

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From 'Psycho' to 'Gone Girl': the best director/composer teams

5 October 2014 7:54 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

With this weekend's release of Gone Girl, director David Fincher has once again showcased the unsettling sounds of award-winning composers Atticus Ross and Trent Reznor (above). Ever since 2010's The Social Network, the duo have become a fixture of Fincher's work. The duo's deceptively minimal sound, with subtle motifs barely hiding cold electronic undercurrents, is remarkably well-suited for Fincher's trademark visual aesthetic, in which every smile and doorway can take on an air of menace if the camera lingers long enough. While he has worked with a number of composers before—most notably Howard ShoreFincher has found »

- Joshua Rivera

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DVD Review: UK Release Of “Two Left Feet” (1963) Starring Michael Crawford, Nyree Dawn Porter And David Hemmings From Network

5 October 2014 2:49 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Howard Hughes

(The following review is of the UK release of the film on Region 2 format.)

In Roy Ward Baker’s 1960s comedy-drama Two Left Feet, Michael Crawford plays Alan Crabbe, a clumsy and unlucky-in-love 19-year-old who begins dating ‘Eileen, the Teacup Queen’, a waitress at his local cafe. She lives in Camden Town and there are rumours that she’s married, but that doesn’t seem to alter her behavior. Alan and Eileen travel into London’s ‘Floride Club’, where the Storyville Jazzmen play trad for the groovers and shakers. Eileen turns out to be a ‘right little madam’, who is really just stringing Alan along. She’s the kind of girl who only dates to get into places and then starts chatting to randoms once inside. She takes up with ruffian Ronnie, while Alan meets a nice girl, Beth Crowley. But Eileen holds a strange hold over »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Fox Chief On Oscar Contender ‘Exodus: Gods & Kings': “You Don’t See Movies On This Scale Anymore”

1 October 2014 6:13 PM, PDT | Deadline New York | See recent Deadline New York news »

Earlier today Deadline debuted the new trailer for 20th Century Fox’s big Christmas picture Exodus: Gods And Kings. The large-scale biblical drama looks Big. Epic. The kind of movie studios used to thrive on but are simply cost-prohibitive these days. Well, they seem to be making a comeback. Ben-Hur, which took 11 Academy Awards in 1959 including Best Picture, is now being remade. Of course Paramount released Darren Aronofsky’s Noah early in the year. But Gladiator in 2000 was the last big-scale epic of this period to wow Academy voters into giving up their Best Picture vote. It’s no coincidence that Ridley Scott directed that one, which also brought Russell Crowe an Oscar for Best Actor. Now Scott is back doing the impossible for Fox with Exodus.

In a brief conversation before the studio’s special press presentation Tuesday evening at the Zanuck Theatre on its lot, Fox Chairman Jim Gianopulos »

- Pete Hammond

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Fear of the Island: Why I Have Yet to Watch Lost

26 September 2014 4:00 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The numbers 4, 8, 15, 16, 23, 42 shouldn’t have any special significance to me, especially in that particular order. Yet I distinctly remember one day in high school, when packs of my friends rapidly discussed these numbers, trying to divine their significance. They seemed very agitated–one pack even erupted in a shouting match outside the band hall–and I eventually overheard names like Locke, Hurley, and Jack. When I eventually put it together that Lost was currently in the process of wrapping up its final season that month, and that there was no one in our school named Locke or Hurley, I was a bit surprised: How could a show about an island inspire such nerdy passion?

I didn’t watch much television when I was younger. The programs I did watch most consistently were Stargate Sg-1, Battlestar Galactica, and House. There was the occasional Simpsons rerun that would blow my mind and »

- Jj Perkins

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British cinema celebrated with new bank of film trivia to coincide with the 58th BFI London Film Festival

25 September 2014 10:00 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Ahead of the 58th BFI London Film Festival, American Express has teamed up with some of Britain’s most influential movie bloggers – including us – to produce a new bank of film trivia celebrating British cinemas rich history.

“There’s so much to celebrate about British film, from iconic locations, multi-award winning production and creative teams to some of the world’s best loved stars,” states Melissa Weber, Vice President Brand and Communications, American Express “People love talking about film and this list should fuel some great discussion, enabling people across the country to get into the spirit of this year’s Film Festival.”

A selection of the facts have been turned into Vine videos to be hosted on Twitter via @AmexUK, using #BritFilmTrivia and will be calling for enthusiasts to trade their favourite facts. Meanwhile, a video has been released with Alex Zane, which you can see below, along with a selection of the trivia… »

- Gary Collinson

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Arts Alliance buys Park Circus

24 September 2014 3:33 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Exclusive: Event cinema specialist acquires classics distributor.

Event cinema specialist Arts Alliance has acquired Scottish-based classic film distributor Park Circus.

Park Circus, established in 2003, reps theatrical rights to more than 20,000 Us and international titles.

The company has re-issued classics including Lawrence of Arabia, The Godfather, Brief Encounter, Heaven’s Gate, Casablanca and It’s A Wonderful Life.

Upcoming releases from Park Circus include Jacques Tati’s Playtime, sci-fi ‘B’ picture Invasion of the Body Snatchers and Samuel Goldwyn’s Guys and Dolls.

Arts Alliance’s event cinema output includes the Royal Opera House opera and ballet, theatre from Shakespeare’s Globe and a new series of original commissions focused on arts events, including the recent Matisse exhibition event from Tate Modern.

Next month it will distribute the anticipated One Direction – Where We Are concert into more than 3,000 screens worldwide.

Mark Foster, CEO of Arts Alliance, said: “Park Circus are passionate about cinema and its rich heritage and now »

- andreas.wiseman@screendaily.com (Andreas Wiseman)

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Film School 101: Prof. Soderbergh examines 'Raiders of the Lost Ark'

23 September 2014 7:20 AM, PDT | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Raiders of the Lost Ark is the Citizen Kane of modern action films, a revolutionary piece of cinematic storytelling that is still the template for just about every action-adventure that rolls into theaters. Director Steven Soderbergh is a major fan, and his admiration appropriately goes to delightfully film-geek lengths. In a recent blog post, Soderbergh marvels at Steven Spielberg’s staging of Raiders; by staging he refers to the alchemic art of putting a shot together and then connecting several shots together to tell a story in the most fluid, unobtrusive, and dynamic manner.

To isolate that subtle aspect of Raiders, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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This is the Part I Really Like: Top ten movie-in-movie moments

23 September 2014 6:30 AM, PDT | Cineplex | See recent Cineplex news »

Sometimes it’s just a joke, sometimes it has hidden meaning, and sometimes it’s simply the director showing off their eclectic taste in all things celluloid (read: Quentin Tarantino). But one thing’s for sure: the annals of cinema history are littered with movie-in-movie moments.

The granddaddy of movie-in-movie moments comes from The Shawshank Redemption – released twenty years ago today. So in honour of its anniversary, we thought we’d go all “meta” by looking back at ten of the most memorable movie-in-movie moments to grace the multiplex.

Gilda (1946) in The Shawshank Redemption (1994)

Though it’s probably a little bit cruel to show prison inmates Rita Hayworth at her finest, this 40’s classic plays a prominent role in the film’s plot as Andy later uses a poster from the 1946 noir to cover the entrance to the tunnel that he’s painstakingly carved out of the prison walls.

The Evil Dead »

- Daniel Bettridge

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Trumbull: Super Hfr could revitalise cinema

15 September 2014 5:41 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Ibc: VFX veteran Douglas Trumbull claims the groundbreaking technology could revitalise the theatrical experience.

Director and VFX veteran Douglas Trumbull has urged filmmakers James Cameron, J.J Abrams and Peter Jackson to adopt his groundbreaking super high frame rate 3D production and presentation format in a bid to revitalise the theatrical experience.

At a screening of his experimental short Ufotog, shot in 3D at 4K resolution and at 120 frames a second, projected for the first time using Christie Digital’s 3D 6P laser projection system at trade show Ibc today, Trumbull called on exhibitors and directors to embrace the format.

“Right now the technical standards of cinema are almost identical to the technology standard of TV,” he said.

“There is very little difference between those two mediums and young people in particular are migrating away from movies because of the convenience of watching movies on a tablet.

“But if we can make an immersive motion picture spectacle »

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Venice Film Review: ‘Theeb’

10 September 2014 7:34 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

. Naji Abu Nowar’s impressive debut feature riffs on oater themes, and the stunning location work in southern Jordan has the grandeur of Monument Valley, yet this is no Western knockoff but a well-told Wwi-era story grounded in Bedouin-specific customs. The best director prize in Venice’s Horizons section will certainly expand Abu Nowar’s horizons and could translate to modest arthouse play, even Stateside.

Jordan’s homegrown cinema output has been minuscule, making “Theeb” (meaning “wolf”) an especially welcome addition that should offer encouragement to aspiring local filmmakers and funding bodies (the pic was supported by Abu Dhabi’s Sanad Fund as well as the Doha Film Institute, the King Abdullah II Fund for Development, and Visions Sud Est). While set in western Arabia in 1916, the movie was shot entirely in Jordan, using mostly non-professional Bedouins whose powerful presence onscreen is a testament to both their talent and U. »

- Jay Weissberg

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Steven Sotloff Remembered by Family and Friends

5 September 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Steven Sotloff had always been interested in exploring the world. Intelligent and inquisitive, he had an easygoing disposition and a sharp sense of humor. While his death at the hands of Isis militants has horrified the nation, the loss has been devastating to those who knew the 31-year-old journalist. His parents, Arthur and Shirley, and sister Lauren are privately grieving, as are friends who remember him fondly as "someone you'd want in your circle." A public memorial service for Sotloff was held Friday afternoon in his hometown of Pinecrest, Florida. "Steve was equally torn between two poles," his family said »

- Steve Helling, @stevehelling

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Reporter Steven Sotloff Remembered by Family and Friends

5 September 2014 11:00 AM, PDT | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Steven Sotloff had always been interested in exploring the world. Intelligent and inquisitive, he had an easygoing disposition and a sharp sense of humor. While his death at the hands of Isis militants has horrified the nation, the loss has been devastating to those who knew the 31-year-old journalist. His parents, Arthur and Shirley, and sister Lauren are privately grieving, as are friends who remember him fondly as "someone you'd want in your circle." A public memorial service for Sotloff was held Friday afternoon in his hometown of Pinecrest, Florida. "Steve was equally torn between two poles," his family said »

- Steve Helling, @stevehelling

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