Lawrence of Arabia
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 50 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Who Should Receive Honorary Oscars Next?

19 July 2016 2:30 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

We're about one month away from the announcement of this year's Honorary Oscar recipients. They're usuallly announced at the end of August for a November Governor's Awards ceremony. This year's ceremony will be on November 12th. Last year rumors circled that it was Doris Day's turn but that didn't turn out to be accurate. For the past two years, The Film Experience has tried to make up for the dearth of movie site reporting about the Oscar Honorary careers (beyond the sharing of press releases / YouTube videos of their speeches) with mini-retrospectives so we're always hoping they'll choose well to give us wonderful careers to discuss right here. 

Let's reprint a list of worthies we shared a year or so ago, with a few adjustments, in case any of the elites in the Academy are undecided about who to put forth or get behind for these coveted honors.

 

James Ivory »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Water Rackets: “Erin Brockovich”

19 July 2016 7:05 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Steven Soderbergh's Erin Brokovich (2000) is playing July 17 - August 16, 2016 on Mubi in the United Kingdom. “Erin Brockovich is perhaps the most forceful articulation of Soderbergh’s proclivity toward emphasizing character over other filmic concerns. Without sacrificing their causal role within the narrative, who characters are is often of greater interest than what they do—indeed, what they will do and accomplish is often a foregone conclusion… while Erin Brockovich may, thematically, be a film about responsibility, formally, Erin Brockovich is a movie about Erin Brockovich—and decidedly so.”— Andrew Patrick Nelson, in The Philosophy of Steven Soderbergh“I’m smart, I’m hardworking and I’m not leaving here without a job.”— Erin, Erin BrockovichErin Brockovich must win people over. As a single mother of three who wears short skirts and low-cut tops, she’s at the more preyed-upon end of a predatory spectrum—one whose social logic is built on first impressions. »

Permalink | Report a problem


Exclusive interview with actor Vladimir Kulich

16 July 2016 5:45 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

david j. moore chats with actor Vladimir Kulich about The 13th Warrior, Ironclad, The Equalizer and his new projects Grave Walkers and Savage Dog

Perhaps best known for playing Buliwyf in The 13th Warrior, the big budget epic sword and sorcery-type film from director John McTiernan and writer Michael Crichton from 1999, actor Vladimir Kulich towers above his co-stars in most of the projects he’s been in. Imbued with a distinct look and voice, Kulich also co-starred in films such as Decoy with Peter Weller, Red Scorpion 2 with Matt McColm, Crackerjack with Thomas Ian Griffith, and Firestorm with Howie Long. Over the years he’s specialized in playing Nordic heroes or stalwart warriors in projects like Ironclad and the TV series Vikings, but he’s also versatile, appearing in key roles in Smokin’ Aces and The Equalizer with Denzel Washington. His latest projects are the independent horror film Grave Walkers »

- admin

Permalink | Report a problem


Howard Gordon Talks Tyrant, Love of America

6 July 2016 6:00 AM, PDT | TVfanatic | See recent TVfanatic news »

Tyrant returns to television tonight. If you are not a fan of knowing anything at all about a series, maybe you shouldn't read this interview. There's nothing drastic, but spoilerphobes, beware.

At the Atx Festival recently, not only did I get a chance to sit down and personally talk to Howard Gordon, creator of Tyrant, but I also went to a panel in which he shared some insight about his career.

Gordon is an incredibly interesting man, and it's no wonder he makes interesting television.

For example, Gordon's first script was for the television show Fame. He wrote a lot of spec scripts for a lot of shows that were nothing like Tyrant or other shows he's known for like Homeland and 24.

So how did Gordon get so good at what he's doing now? The tragedy of 9/11 pointed his interest. "It was such a trauma for everybody, for America and for the world. »

- Carissa Pavlica

Permalink | Report a problem


Tony Kaye Lives: How The Fallen ‘American History X’ Director Hopes to Exorcise His Demons For His Boldest Feature Yet

14 June 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

At 63, Tony Kaye is plotting another comeback. Although he’s always been an award-winning director of commercials and music videos, his feature career is a study in scorched earth. His last feature was five years ago; before that, he shot “Black Water Transit,” which was never finished. And then there’s his debut, a masterpiece riddled with production woes called “American History X.”

That track record leads to perceptions that it’s impossible to take Kaye seriously — but that would be a mistake.

Studios may view him as a flustered and frustrating eccentric, but Kaye remains a rare breed — an outlaw artist working through one hurdle after another, beaten but not broken, and always ready to rise again. While virtually every American studio movie reflects some kind of compromise, truly unfiltered creative visions are rare. At a time when we could use more committed independents, we don’t hear from Kaye nearly enough.

That’s about to change, and while his characteristic brashness is still evident, he said he’s learned a bit of restraint. “We’ve all got demons inside of us,” he explained in a recent phone interview. “I’ve gotten rid of mine — or got them under control.”

His chosen vehicle to showcase that rehabilitation is “Stranger Than the Wheel,” Kaye’s first feature-length project since 2011’s “Detachment.” Last fall, Kaye announced on Facebook that Shia Labeouf would star in the self-financed film.

He’s wanted to make this movie for decades. In the early ’90s, Kaye was a popular director of commercials and music videos (he won a Grammy for Soul Asylum’s “Runaway Train” video). But his goal was to make movies. “Stranger Than the Wheel” was one of three scripts he considered for his debut (another one was written by a newcomer named M. Night Shyamalan; the third was “American History X”).

Written by Joe Vinciguerra, “Stranger Than the Wheel” is the story of a young man who struggles to reconnect with his estranged father. “It’s a kind of serial drama about isolation, alienation, and alcoholism,” Kaye said recently, clearly relating — even if he hadn’t lost his father in recent years, Kaye would identify with the character’s alienated state.

In April, Kaye announced the departure of his lead via email, with the subject line “Shia Labeouf Qu!T.” (“Tony and I rolled around and wrestled an idea together,” Labeouf explained by email. “We shot a test. But in the end, we are not making a film together.”) Now the film will star Evan Ross (“The Hunger Games”). Kaye has been shooting test footage, and plans to begin production later this summer, with the stated (if unlikely) goal of finishing the picture in time for the fall festival circuit.

Or, all of this could be a preamble for more of the same. Eighteen years ago, “American History X” was also gearing up for a fall  showcase — the Toronto International Film Festival offered it a prime slot — when Kaye flew across the country to meet with festival CEO and director Piers Handling. Claiming New Line Cinema had made changes to the film without his permission, Kaye asked Handling to refuse the studio’s version and show his cut instead.

“He was eccentric, opinionated, and had a very strong sense of what he wanted to do,” Handling recalled, noting that Kaye brought a small digital camera with him to their meeting and recorded the whole conversation. Handling talked to the studio about showing Kaye’s version, but instead, the company pulled the movie from the lineup.

While artistic temperaments are often part of the filmmaker package, Kaye is a breed apart. He’s the kind of Hollywood aberrant whom the corporate-overlord studio system has all but bred out of existence. “Tony doesn’t play that game,” Handling said. “He always wants to do things on his own terms.”

That’s an especially dicey proposition in 2016, an age in which every facet of the entertainment industry is deathly allergic to risk. Anyone concerned about the bottom line would be wary of Kaye’s track record when it comes to managing a responsible production.

During production on “American History X,” Kaye went to war with his star, Edward Norton, declaring him unfit for the part. (He later received his second Oscar nomination.) Kaye hired a priest, a rabbi and a Buddhist monk to join a meeting with New Line executive Michael De Luca. Editing was a protracted process and, after Kaye completed a cut the studio liked, he demanded eight more weeks to radically reimagine the film.

When New Line refused, Kaye began trashing the movie; he threatened to remove his credit and replace it with “Humpty Dumpty.” (That has since become the title of an unfinished documentary about the production that Kaye hopes to release.) Then came the Toronto showdown.

When it was all over, Kaye had earned the outright ire of New Line, the DGA, and the Alliance of Motion Picture & Television Producers; everyone else was confounded. After that, things didn’t get easier. While he won a lifetime achievement award for his advertising work in early 2001, that fall, Marlon Brando hired Kaye to direct a series of acting workshops. The filmmaker showed up dressed as Osama bin Laden, shortly after 9/11, infuriating everyone involved.

A year later, he confessed his major regret in an article for The Guardian. “I thought I was upholding the old movie industry traditions of strutting around, picking fights with the studio and being the fly in everyone’s ointment,” he wrote. “I had passion — you have to give me that. But I was, it has to be said, a spectacular pain in the ass.” These days, he describes his previous setbacks as the result of “desire for self alone.”

Whatever his current emotional state may be, his existing filmography speaks on its own terms. If there’s an overarching theme to Kaye’s work, it’s his ability to deliver achingly real portraits of America’s fractured communities.

Kaye’s antics make it almost too easy to dismiss his filmmaking outright — as this writer did initially, with “Detachment.” The vulgar tale of a disgruntled public high school instructor (Adrien Brody) struck me as a shrill riff on “Half Nelson.” At Kaye’s urging, I took a second look, and found that “Detachment” is more than theatrics surrounding student-teacher relationships: it’s a tender investigation into what it means to feel utterly helpless while battling institutional dysfunction.

But nothing in Kaye’s filmography demonstrates his vision more cohesively than “Lake of Fire,” the haunting black-and-white encapsulation of abortion debate in America that Kaye spent decades assembling. From its visceral imagery of abortion operations to the angry protestors, the film conveys an operatic vision of anger and frustration rendered in expressionistic terms.

Kaye realizes it’s his most coherent achievement to date. “I don’t know how I made that movie,” he said.

“There are some people who don’t really fit into the Hollywood structure,” said Handling. “Tony’s one of those guys. He’s a renegade, an outsider — not unlike Orson Welles.” And like Welles, Kaye’s sensibility extends beyond the fits of ambitious projects, some more polished than others. The man is indistinguishable from his movies.

Kaye has remained an accomplished commercial artist. The money he makes on ads enable him to self-finance his films. He also recently completed work for the virtual reality company Jaunt on a six-part series, “Pure McCartney,” which features McCartney at home discussing his relationship to five different songs. Kaye spoke emphatically about the possibilities of the new technology. “It’s this incredible process of carrying the viewer into a solitary experience,” he said.

Kaye described his current inspirations as ranging from Jackson Pollock to David Lean, whose “Lawrence of Arabia” epitomizes the kind of sprawling drama Kaye hopes to create. “I’ll get there,” he said, and hopes to do it with “Stranger Than the Wheel.”

His new star is thrilled at the prospect. “I’m generally just excited about anything Tony Kaye does,” said Ross, who has already been shooting footage for the project around Los Angeles. “I don’t think I’ve worked with a director like him who can just put incredible things together.”

Kaye shared his vision with IndieWire via multiple emails, showcasing photos of ink-blotted pages filled with fractured images from his planning sessions for the film: a raggedy school bus, some kind of giraffe-bird mashup, an impressionistic sketch of his leading man, the quixotically named Faunce Bartleby.

“I think I am real,” he wrote at one point. At another, he noted that he planned to turn “Stranger Than the Wheel” into a musical — “a dramuzical epic,” as he wrote in an email. At times, he sounded off about his resistance to industry standards, noting his frustration over a recent big studio film he attended with his kids. “These perpetrators of pollution people should not be allowed to work!” he wrote.

Will Kaye succeed in bringing his visions to the world? If not, it won’t be for lack of trying. While he has struggled with a stutter over the years, the impediment was barely discernible in recent conversations. Kaye has no trouble formulating the case for his latest efforts.

“I’ve got something marvelous here,” Kaye said of his new project. “Don’t worry: I want it to be a hit.”

Related storiesTony Kaye Returns With 'Stranger Than The Wheel' Starring Shia Labeouf'American History X' Director Tony Kaye Says He's Still In Director's JailDaily Reads: Going Deep on Mark Wahlberg, How Pop Culture's White Supremacists Validate Lone-Wolf Racism, and More »

- Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


How The Battle of the Somme sparked cinema’s obsession with war

10 June 2016 7:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

One hundred years after the battle of the Somme and the groundbreaking film that followed, Laura Clouting explores the challenges of dramatising the fear, courage and complicated reality of going into combat

In a few weeks’ time, 100 years will have passed since the first day of the battle of the Somme. Tens of thousands of soldiers went “over the top” at 7.30am on 1 July 1916. The moment looms large in the collective national memory – nearly 20,000 British soldiers died that day, just the first of the “big push” that continued into the winter months.

The ferocious offensive drew on Britain’s imperial forces, and was the bloody debut of civilian volunteers who had flooded recruitment halls in 1914. Among them were two individuals who weren’t there to fight, yet were profoundly influential in shaping our vision of the conflict. Cameramen Geoffrey Malins and John McDowell were in France to record the footage »

- Laura Clouting

Permalink | Report a problem


Tyler Perry Based His Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles 2 Character On An Unexpected Person

3 June 2016 11:43 AM, PDT | cinemablend.com | See recent Cinema Blend news »

Actors often like to base their performances on real-life individuals. Heath Ledger.s Joker was partly inspired by Tom Waits, Michael Fassbender.s Prometheus portrayal was based on Peter O.Toole in Lawrence Of Arabia, and now Tyler Perry has admitted that his turn as Baxter Stockman in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out Of The Shadows was influenced by none other than the national treasure that is Dr. Neil deGrasse TysonTyler Perry made this revelation while talking to Fandango about his villainous role in the blockbuster, admitting that while Neil deGrasse Tyson was used as a starting off point for his work, he soon deviated because the renowned scientist is just too nice. Tyler Perry explained: He was a bit of my muse, I will tell you that much. [Tyson] is nowhere near this insane, diabolical madman I was doing, but he was definitely my muse as far as »

Permalink | Report a problem


Alien: Covenant - brand new image of cockpit

27 May 2016 2:51 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Den Of Geek Jul 22, 2016

A new image from the production of Alien: Covenant surfaces as filming on the Prometheus sequel wraps...

Just a quick further image from the end of filming on Alien: CovenantDanny McBride has posted this one, of him in a posh cockpit...

 

Previously, a further end of filming image was release on the official Alien Anthology Twitter account, showing director Ridley Scott and series newcomer Katherine Waterston looking cheerful on the movie's set.

But note the hairstyle, the vest and the way the gun's slung over Waterston's shoulder. Isn't she looking more and more like Ripley with every passing image? In this instance, she looks very like Aliens-era Ripley, which we're guessing is far from a coincidence.

With Alien: Covenant due out in August 2017, Scott now has just over a year to take the movie through post-production. We'll be sure to keep you updated as more details emerge. »

Permalink | Report a problem


A Hologram For The King review

23 May 2016 5:58 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

facebook

twitter

google+

Director Tom Tykwer tackles Dave Eggers' A Hologram For The King, with help from Tom Hanks. Here's our review...

The opening dream sequence of A Hologram For The King finds status symbols of the American dream evaporating into puffs of purple smoke as Alan Clay (Tom Hanks) paraphrases the opening of Talking Heads' Once In A Lifetime - “You may find yourself looking for your large automobile... without a beautiful house, without a beautiful wife and you may ask yourself, well, how did I get here?”- to the fourth wall and then the heavens above.

This is representative of writer-director Tom Tykwer's slightly sunnier take on Dave Eggers' acclaimed novel, in which struggling salesman Alan travels to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to pitch a virtual reality conferencing system to the king. Unfortunately, Alan is on thin ice with his company, who »

Permalink | Report a problem


Book Review: “TCM Presents The Essentials—52 Must-see Movies And Why They Matter” (2016; by Jeremy Arnold; Foreword by Robert Osborne) (Running Press)

16 May 2016 3:10 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

The Essentials”—A Good Starting Point

By Raymond Benson

Any book that claims to be a collection of the “best” of something—whether it is a listing of movies, music, art, and so forth—has to be taken with a grain of salt. These kinds of things are entirely subjective; although in this case, TCM (Turner Classic Movies) does have a kind of clout and expertise in the matter.

That said, we have this beautifully-designed and illustrated coffee-table trade paperback that contains not 1000, not 100, not 50... but 52 “essential must-see movies.” TCM’s spokesperson, Robert Osborne, explains the criteria in his Foreword—“The Essentials” is a weekly Saturday night event on the television network in which a guest host (the likes of Rob Reiner, Sydney Pollack, Peter Bogdanovich, Drew Barrymore, and more) introduce a picture he or she believes is an Essential. The book is a collection of some of these Essentials, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

Permalink | Report a problem


Joseph Fiennes: the sequel

15 May 2016 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Twenty years ago, the Shakespeare in Love star had Hollywood at his feet – then he all but disappeared. So what happened?

Joseph Fiennes is currently specialising in second acts. This weekend he is in Cannes to promote his film The Last Race, the unofficial Chinese-made sequel to Chariots of Fire. Fiennes plays Eric Liddell, the Flying Scotsman who in 1924 famously refused to run on an Olympic Sunday because of his religious beliefs. The film is concerned with the little-known years after that in which Liddell gave up on sporting fame to become a Christian missionary in China.

To open that film, Fiennes is taking a couple of days away from rehearsing the comparable afterlife of that other Boy’s Own legend, Lawrence of Arabia. Fiennes takes the lead in Adrian Noble’s Chichester Festival revival of Terence Rattigan’s play Ross, which finds Lawrence home from the desert after something »

- Tim Adams

Permalink | Report a problem


Examining Hollywood Remakes: The Hollow Man

8 May 2016 7:26 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

Our series on remakes continues with a movie which is ironic because it’s about a man who can’t be seen but in reality, it’s actually the movie which shouldn’t be seen. This week, Cinelinx looks at The Hollow Man (2000).

The Hollow Man is a modern reimaging of the oft-copied Invisible Man story, first brought to the screen by Universal Studios in 1933. The story is based on H. G. Wells' famous science fiction novel “The Invisible Man”, published in 1897, which told the tale of a scientist who develops an invisibility serum and uses himself as a test subject, becoming both invisible and dangerously insane.

The 1933 classic The Invisible Man, which was part of Universal Studios cluster of successful horror film franchises, was directed by James Whale, who also directed Frankenstein and the Bride of Frankenstein. The 1933 version has an impressive 100% rating on Rotten Tomatoes. It was selected »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


Dice Officially Unveils Battlefield 1; Wwi Setting, October Release And Pre-Order Bonuses Confirmed

6 May 2016 1:20 PM, PDT | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

Much like Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare before it, the official reveal event of 2016’s Battlefield has been undercut by so many leaks that there’s only so much more EA and Dice can unveil. Nevertheless, building upon an extensive presentation of the franchise’s history, both parties finally brought the curtain down on this year’s entry into the juggernaut Fps franchise – Battlefield 1.

Rolling back the years to situate the series in World War I – a realistic version of The Great War, that is, as apposed to an alternate history as earlier reports has suggested – the sizzle reel above offers up a rapid fire of some key elements from the game, including trench warfare, tanks, mustard gas, flamethrowers, battleships and booming artillery.

More News From The Web

Cover art for Battlefield 1 also indicates that the lead protagonist will hail from the Harlem Hellfighters, an African-American infantry unit that faced »

- Michael Briers

Permalink | Report a problem


The Sky Trembles and the Earth Is Afraid and the Two Eyes Are Not Brothers review – brutal essay on orientalism

5 May 2016 1:45 PM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Ben Rivers’ challenging film adapts a Paul Bowles short story about a high-handed European in Morocco to chilling effect

Related: Ben Rivers: ‘You find abandoned sets from films like Lawrence of Arabia just standing there in the desert’

Here is a challenging, cerebral slow-burner from the artist and film-maker Ben Rivers. It unfolds calmly, blankly, then contorts into violence: part drama, part opaque essay film on the nature of orientalism. This is a free adaptation of Paul Bowles’s 1945 short story A Distant Episode; there are also echoes of Lawrence and Kipling. The title is the strange babble that Bowles once overheard on the lips of a stranger, and this occult outburst reportedly inspired the writer’s disturbing tale about a European professor of languages who comes to Morocco intent on studying dialect, behaves high-handedly with the locals and is treated with terrifying violence that is far from justified »

- Peter Bradshaw

Permalink | Report a problem


The 80 Best-Directed Films, According to the Directors Guild of America

3 May 2016 6:59 AM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

With editors and cinematographers chiming in on the best examples of their craft in cinema history, it’s now time for directors to have a say. To celebrate the 80th anniversary of the Directors Guild of America, they’ve conducted a poll for their members when it comes to the 80 greatest directorial achievements in feature films since the organization’s founding in 1936. With 2,189 members participating, the top pick went to Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather, one of three films from the director making the top 10.

Even with films from nonmembers being eligible, the male-dominated, America-centric choices are a bit shameful (Kathryn Bigelow is the only female director on the list, and the first foreign film doesn’t show up until number 26), but not necessarily surprising when one looks at the make-up of its membership. As with any list, there’s bound to be disagreements (Birdman besting The Bicycle Thief, »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Celebrate the Greatest Cinematography of All-Time With New Video Essay

28 April 2016 12:40 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

If beauty is in the eye of the beholder, then there will never be a definitive list of the greatest cinematography, but for our money, one of the finest polls has been recently conducted on the matter. Our friend Scout Tafoya polled over 60 critics on Fandor, including some of us here, and the results can be found in a fantastic video essay below. Rather than the various wordless supercuts that crowd Vimeo, Tafoya wrestles with his thoughts on cinematography as we see the beautiful images overlaid from the top 12 choices.

“I’ve been thinking of the world cinematographically since high school,” Scout says. “Sometime around tenth grade I started looking out windows, at crowds of my peers, at the girls I had crushes on, and imagining the best way to film them. Lowlight, mini-dv or 35mm? Curious and washed out like the way Emmanuel Lubezki shot Y Tu Mamá También, »

- Jordan Raup

Permalink | Report a problem


Watch: Restore your love in movies, here’s short film ‘100 Years/100 Shots’

22 April 2016 8:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Filmmaker and self-pronounced cinephile Jacob T. Swinney has a new video essay called 100 Years/100 Shots. The title’s pretty self-explanatory. It’s about the history of Tequila in the 21st century.

Swinney has chosen his most memorable shot from each year in the last 100 and placed them next to each other in chronological sequence. Not only does it fascinatingly chart the evolution of the medium, it also reaffirms why we devote so much of our spare time to the movies. See beneath the video embed below for the full list (in order) used.

100 Years/100 Shots from Jacob T. Swinney on Vimeo.

Birth of a Nation

Intolerance

The Immigrant

A Dog’s Life

Broken Blossoms

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The Kid

Nosferatu

Safety Last

Sherlock Junior

Battleship Potemkin

The General

Metropolis

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Un Chien Andalou

All Quiet on the Western Front

Frankenstein

Scarface

King Kong »

- Oli Davis

Permalink | Report a problem


Dillinger

18 April 2016 9:23 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Guns! Guns! Guns! John Milius' rootin' tootin' bio of the most famous of the '30s bandits has plenty of good things to its credit, especially its terrific, funny cast, topped by the unlikely star Warren Oates. The battles between Dillinger's team of all-star bank robbers and Ben Johnson's G-Man aren't neglected, as Milius savors every gun recoil and Tommy gun blast. Dillinger Blu-ray + DVD Arrow Video U.S. 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Warren Oates, Ben Johnson, Michelle Phillips, Cloris Leachman, Harry Dean Stanton, Geoffrey Lewis, John Ryan, Richard Dreyfuss, Steve Kanaly, John Martino, Roy Jenson, Frank McRae. Cinematography Jules Brenner Special Effects A.D. Flowers, Cliff Wenger Edited by Fred R. Feitshans, Jr. Original Music Barry De Vorzon Produced by Buzz Feitshans Written and Directed by John Milius

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

There it was in the dentist's office, an article in either »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


Sky and Sony strike European movie deal

18 April 2016 7:34 AM, PDT | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Deal includes forthcoming titles Ghostbusters and Money Monster.

Sky has struck a European movie deal with Sony Pictures Television – its first pan-regional agreement since the creation of Sky Europe.

The deal will enable the pay-tv operator to launch all new and future Sony films across the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria and Italy.

It covers new movies including the forthcoming Ghostbusters reboot, Angry Birds, Money Monster and Inferno shown on its linear Sky Movies, Sky Cinema and Sky Film services as well as its transactional movie services Sky Store, Sky Select and Sky Primafila. It will also cover Uhd productions for the first time, as well as library titles including the Spider-Man franchise, Lawrence Of Arabia, Philadelphia, Men In Black and The Karate Kid.

It is the first cross-territory deal that Sky has struck since it brought together its services in the UK and Ireland with Sky Italia and Sky Deutschland in 2014.

“Along with our investments in entertainment »

Permalink | Report a problem


Pay TV Operator Sky Signs First Pan-European Movie Deal with Sony Pictures

17 April 2016 10:32 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

London — Pay TV operator Sky has signed its first pan-European movie deal. The exclusive pact with Sony Pictures covers the countries in which Sky operates, which are the U.K., Ireland, Germany, Austria and Italy.

Sky has already struck pan-European deals for TV series with HBO and Showtime, but this is its first pact with a Hollywood studio for movies. Sky’s movie deals in the past have been made on a country-by-country basis.

The Sony Pictures agreement, which covers Sky’s subscription and transactional movie services, allows it to deliver new movies to its 21 million customers more than a year ahead of any other subscription service and only a few months after they have been released in movie theaters. The package comprises all new and future Sony releases, including “Ghostbusters,” “Angry Birds,” “Money Monster” and “Inferno,” and also includes library titles such as “Lawrence of Arabia,” “Philadelphia” and “Close Encounters of the Third Kind, »

- Leo Barraclough

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 50 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners