Lawrence of Arabia
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

1-20 of 104 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Will the Academy Awards Recognize Casting?

21 hours ago | backstage.com | See recent Backstage news »

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences presented special Oscars to some of Hollywood’s veteran industry leaders Nov. 12 at the Ray Dolby Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland Center. For the eighth year running, the Governors Awards have served to complement the Oscars ceremony, honoring “extraordinary distinction in lifetime achievement, exceptional contributions to the state of motion picture arts and sciences, or for outstanding service to the Academy.” This year’s honorees, big-screen legend Jackie Chan, documentarian Frederick Wiseman (“Titicut Follies”), editor Anne V. Coates (“Lawrence of Arabia”), and casting director Lynn Stalmaster, were recognized as “true pioneers and legends in their crafts,” as Academy President Cheryl Boone Isaacs said in a statement. Each has blazed trails in their respective fields, making them ideal recipients of such a distinctive prize. Nowhere is this more true than for Stalmaster, who has made history as the first casting director to be formally recognized by the Academy. »

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Review: Allied's Old School Beauty

26 November 2016 3:33 PM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

by Eric Blume

The lovely opening image of Robert Zemeckis’ new film Allied has Brad Pitt falling slowly and soundlessly into the North African desert via parachute.  As he walks across the spine of an endlessly long sand dune, the film evokes the luxurious opening of The English Patient and of course the granddaddy of desert films, Lawrence of Arabia.  And Pitt’s arrival into Casablanca, Morocco tees up memories of the Bogart-Bergman classic.  Zemeckis positions us exactly where he wants us to be:  open to the possibility of the pleasures of those highly-romantic, old-school pictures that we truly don’t see anymore...

»

- Eric Blume

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Brad Pitt and Marion Cotillard Make Love in War, then War in Love, in the Entertaining Spy-and-Sex Drama Allied

22 November 2016 9:08 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Merci, Madame Cotillard: The Oscar-winning actress bravely and/or gamely has agreed to become Brad Pitt’s first onscreen leading lady since his split from the one with the soaring cheekbones. She’s superb — the best thing — in director Robert ZemeckisAllied, an entertaining but ungainly spies-and-sex epic that tries to be both to be an old-school Hollywood romance, swanky and exotic, and a domestic espionage drama of a more conventionally crabbed intensity.

It’s all very Casablanca at the start — Morocco during World War II, in fact — with Pitt and Cotillard teaming up as Allied operatives. She’s Marianne Beauséjour, »

- tgliatto

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Top Directors Banking on Nostalgia

22 November 2016 9:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Mel Gibson, Warren Beatty and Robert Zemeckis have a trio of films on offer this month that could appeal to Academy voters longing for a throwback vibe, while Ben Affleck has another on the way in December.

Gibson’s “Hacksaw Ridge,” a World War II epic centered on conscientious objector Desmond Doss, feels like a prestige battle picture cut from the Allan Dwan/William Wellman mold.

“One of the best compliments I’ve received is, ‘Wow, it’s like the way they used to make films,’” Gibson said recently on Variety’s “Playback” podcast. “I said, ‘You mean like back in the ‘40s?’ And they said, ‘No, like back in the ’80s’ — like it’s ancient history!”

Such comments are a reflection, the director says, of the fact that the character of the feature-film business has changed. “It’s like chain restaurants or something,” he said. “I believe that if something is good, »

- Kristopher Tapley

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‘Allied’ review: “A beautifully shot film, reminiscent of the classics”

21 November 2016 12:01 AM, PST | The Hollywood News | See recent The Hollywood News news »

Allied review: Love, loyalty, trust and war collide in Robert Zemeckis’ latest.

Allied review, Kat Hughes.

Allied review

The year is 1942, in French Morocco an American operative parachutes onto the sandy dunes before being picked up and whisked away to his ‘wife’. This is how Allied begins and, just like the rest of the film, isn’t quite what it seems.

Set during World War II, our story tells the journey of intelligence officer Max (Brad Pitt) who encounters a French Resistance fighter, Marianne (Marion Cotillard), when they embark on a deadly mission behind enemy lines. Whilst they prepare for the task ahead the pair fall for each other and, upon completion of their deed, return to London and get married. Cut to a year later and the pair are happily married with a child, but Max gets news that his wife might actually be a German double agent. He »

- Kat Hughes

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Why Are The Best Film Editors Female?

20 November 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway looks at why so many great films were cut by women…

You may not have noticed in among all news reports about Jackie Chan being awarded one, but last week Anne V. Coates was given an Honorary Oscar. You might not know her name, but you certainly know her work.

Coates has worked as a film editor since the 1950s, cutting everything from Lawrence of Arabia to Fifty Shades of Grey (one of them is about a guy who keep his love for flagellation secret, and the other is Fifty Shades of Grey). She’s had a remarkable career, and though she’s one of only a small number of female editors, they all seem to be among the best in the business.

Last year, one film swept the board when it came to awards for best editing; Mad Max: Fury Road, a film that is »

- Neil Calloway

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Rabid

19 November 2016 10:19 AM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

David Cronenberg puts Canada on the horror map with yet another early career ick-fest, about a vampiric woman armed with a new mutant organ. Marilyn Chambers is the dangerous female who spreads a plague of bloody murder. Fun for the whole family. Rabid Blu-ray Scream Factory 1977 / Color / 1:66 widescreen / 91 min. / Street Date November 22, 2016 / 34.93 Starring Marilyn Chambers, Frank Moore, Joe Silver, Howard Ryshpan, Patricia Gage, Susan Roman, Roger Periard, Lynne Deragon, Allan Moyle, Robert A. Silverman. Cinematography René Verzier Makeup Effects Joe Blasco Music Supervisor Ivan Reitman Editor Jean Lafleur Produced by John Dunning, Ivan Reitman Written and Directed by David Cronenberg

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Now available in Region A, David Cronenberg's Rabid is slightly different than the Blu-ray released in the UK last year by Arrow. It's touted as a new transfer. Some of the previous extras have been retained and others dropped, and two new items have been added. »

- Glenn Erickson

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‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood

18 November 2016 8:30 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

These are challenging times for any filmmaker who doesn’t want to be told what to do. Chasing a slice of the Hollywood studio pie almost always brings compromise, and many foreign-born directors return to their home countries and assemble independent film and television projects.

That was the path of Dutch-born Paul Verhoeven, whose career began in his own language with “Soldier of Orange” and the Oscar-nominated “Turkish Delight.”  From there he forged an A-list career that included “Basic Instinct” (which played competition in Cannes) “RoboCop,” “Total Recall,” “Starship Troopers,” and, yes, “Showgirls.” His last Hollywood movie was “Hollow Man” with Kevin Bacon in 2000.

When Verhoeven could no longer find material that suited him, he went back to Holland. His 2006 Dutch World War II drama “Black Book” (Sony Pictures Classics) starred Carice Van Houten, before she joined “Game of Thrones,” and was shortlisted for the foreign Oscar.

Now he has »

- Anne Thompson

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‘Elle’ Director Paul Verhoeven’s 10 Tips For a Successful Career After Hollywood

18 November 2016 8:30 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

These are challenging times for any filmmaker who doesn’t want to be told what to do. Chasing a slice of the Hollywood studio pie almost always brings compromise, and many foreign-born directors return to their home countries and assemble independent film and television projects.

That was the path of Dutch-born Paul Verhoeven, whose career began in his own language with “Soldier of Orange” and the Oscar-nominated “Turkish Delight.”  From there he forged an A-list career that included “Basic Instinct” (which played competition in Cannes) “RoboCop,” “Total Recall,” “Starship Troopers,” and, yes, “Showgirls.” His last Hollywood movie was “Hollow Man” with Kevin Bacon in 2000.

When Verhoeven could no longer find material that suited him, he went back to Holland. His 2006 Dutch World War II drama “Black Book” (Sony Pictures Classics) starred Carice Van Houten, before she joined “Game of Thrones,” and was shortlisted for the foreign Oscar.

Now he has »

- Anne Thompson

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Battlefield 1’s Huge November Update Now Live On All Platforms, See The Full List Of Tweaks

15 November 2016 8:39 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

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Following a period of scheduled maintenance, Battlefield 1‘s huge November update is now live across all platforms, and it appears Dice has zeroed in on many of the issues and concerns raised by the shooter’s community. Yes, those pesky AA guns and mortars have now been nerfed.

Clocking in at 1.9Gb across PlayStation 4 and Xbox One – PC owners, by comparison, will be required to free up 1.6Gb of space – you can find the full, exhaustive list of tweaks and changes embedded below. Dice promised to ring the changes as the fall season drew to a close and for all intents and purposes, the developer has left no stone unturned.

Elsewhere, based on the number of daily active users, we know that Battlefield 1 will go down as the biggest launch in Dice’s history, easily eclipsing both Star Wars Battlefront »

- Michael Briers

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Watch Jackie Chan, Frederick Wiseman, Anne V. Coates, and More Accept Honorary Oscars

14 November 2016 2:49 PM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Each year, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences selects a small group of talented artists in the field of filmmaking to award Honorary Oscars. Considering the length of the standard Oscars broadcast, they thankfully dedicate a separate night to the ceremony with the Governors Awards. Held this past weekend, action icon Jackie Chan, legendary documentary director Frederick Wiseman, editor Anne V. Coates, and casting director Lynn Stalmaster all accepted their awards and we have the videos to prove it.

Each immensely deserving of their award, Chan’s contributions to cinema are ubiquitous across the world and one can’t imagine the documentary form would be the same without Wiseman’s work. From Lawrence of Arabia all the way up to last year’s Fifty Shades of Grey, Coates has an incredibly varied resume of editing work as on the greatest in her field. One can also thank Stalmaster »

- Jordan Raup

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Governors Awards: Inside Hollywood’s Attempt to Clear Post-Election Fog and Kickstart Oscar Race

14 November 2016 8:55 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In its own way, the Governors Awards is the most important film event of the year. On the surface, it’s the Academy Awards rendered in miniature as the Academy Board of Governors presents honorary Oscars to veteran film artists. But in reality, this is the Oscar starting gun wrapped in tuxedos and Louboutins: There’s never greater proximity to Academy voters.

Launched in 2009 to present career awards while not extending the already-long Oscarcast, the Governors Awards are meant to evoke the more-intimate feel of early Academy Award ceremonies. However, Oscar consultants quickly saw the event as an odyssey in its own right, since it provides an opportunity for intimate, grade-a campaigning just at the start of Phase 1 — the period that defines the Oscar season up until nominations are announced.

It’s a moment that won’t be matched for the rest of the season, but it also makes for »

- Anne Thompson

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Governors Awards: Inside Hollywood’s Attempt to Clear Post-Election Fog and Kickstart Oscar Race

14 November 2016 8:55 AM, PST | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In its own way, the Governors Awards is the most important film event of the year. On the surface, it’s the Academy Awards rendered in miniature as the Academy Board of Governors presents honorary Oscars to veteran film artists. But in reality, this is the Oscar starting gun wrapped in tuxedos and Louboutins: There’s never greater proximity to Academy voters.

Launched in 2009 to present career awards while not extending the already-long Oscarcast, the Governors Awards are meant to evoke the more-intimate feel of early Academy Award ceremonies. However, Oscar consultants quickly saw the event as an odyssey in its own right, since it provides an opportunity for intimate, grade-a campaigning just at the start of Phase 1 — the period that defines the Oscar season up until nominations are announced.

It’s a moment that won’t be matched for the rest of the season, but it also makes for »

- Anne Thompson

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Jackie Chan Oscar Climaxes Warm Evening at the Governors Awards

13 November 2016 12:31 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Creativity and longevity were the key words Saturday night at the eighth annual Governors Awards, as Oscars were handed to four individuals who collectively represented about 225 years of film experience.

Honorees were Jackie Chan, editor Anne V. Coates, casting director Lynn Stalmaster and documentarian Frederick Wiseman at Hollywood & Highland.

At the cocktail reception and the pre-dinner schmoozing, the conversation was dominated by the Nov. 8 election of Donald Trump, as well as handicapping the current awards season, with most of the films in contention being represented.

However, politics and the 2016 awards took a back seat once the 75-minute ceremony started, with knockout clip montages and verbal tributes to the four honorees.

Chan, looking about the same age as he did in the 1970s scenes of his work, climaxed the evening with the shortest and most exuberant speech, saying that years ago, he saw an Oscar at Sylvester Stallone’s house, and »

- Tim Gray

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Production Designer Dennis Gassner on James Bond, ‘Blade Runner,’ Coen Bros.

11 November 2016 12:42 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Dennis Gassner’s production design work has enriched films ranging from “The Truman Show” and the Coen Brothers’ “O Brother, Where Art Thou” to Tim Burton’s “Big Fish” — and more recently the Bond movies “Skyfall” and “Spectre” — with a compelling visual style that has earned him an honor at Camerimage for his unique visual sensitivity. The former architecture student and one-time lumberjack cites “Lawrence of Arabia” as a major influence, along with early work with Francis Ford Coppola’s American Zoetrope shingle.

What can you talk about the world you’ve created for the “Blade Runner 2049” reboot, which you’re shooting with Denis Villeneuve in Hungary? The seminal 1982 sci-fi original had a distinct sort of ‘80s sense of the future that now seems a bit retro.

The darkness is the reality of “Blade Runner.” It’s like anything — you carry on the message. “Star Wars” does the same thing, »

- Will Tizard

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‘Lawrence of Arabia’ Editor Anne Coates on Why So Many Great Editors Are Female

11 November 2016 10:05 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

At venerable Pinewood Studios west of London, a fledgling Anne Coates hoped editing experience would serve as a stepping stone to directing. No surprise, the industry proved even more resistant back in the 1950s to female occupants of the canvas chair than today.

But the cutting room has always welcomed a woman’s firm hand, whether old school “cutting neg” or manipulating top-of-the-line digital equipment. The would-be helmer soon became a celebrated doyenne of the world editing community, subject of academic analysis of the “Anne Coates style,” a concept about which she claims to have no clue.

Now she’s become only the second editor to receive an honorary Oscar, to be awarded at the Academy of Motion Pictures Governors Awards on Saturday, after MGM stalwart Margaret Booth in 1978.

Coates has worked with the best directors. Tasked with presenting her assemblage of “Lawrence of Arabia” test footage, she trembled until »

- Bob Verini

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Brad Pitt, Marion Cotillard Discuss Challenges Shooting ‘Allied’

10 November 2016 10:31 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Movie history was on full display at Wednesday’s world premiere of Paramount’s World War II thriller “Allied” at the Regency Village Theatre in Westwood.

In a post-screening Q&A, Brad Pitt told the audience that he’s been drawn to the period — via “Inglourious Basterds,” “Fury” and now “Allied” — due to compelling stories, adding, “I don’t have a fetish for World War II.”

Director Robert Zemeckis admitted that he was inspired by “Lawrence of Arabia” in the movie’s opening sequences. “When we were shooting on the sand dunes, I was copying David Lean.”

Zemeckis admitted that much of his shooting drew upon his extensive experience in visual effects, such as the use of a single plane for Pitt’s flying scenes. Pitt evoked major laughs when he quipped, “I fly pretty well, don’t I?”

Asked about the challenge of making his Canadian character speak French with a Parisian accent, »

- Dave McNary

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Warren Beatty on His Long-Awaited Return to Hollywood With ‘Rules Don’t Apply’

8 November 2016 10:00 AM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

“Hello. It’s Hollywood Actor Warren Beatty.”

And so it is. The voice on the other end of the phone would be hard to duplicate. As would the rhetorical joyride that the actor/writer/director is about to take me on — as winding as the road to his Mulholland Drive home.

It begins with a riff on the Democratic National Convention (“authentic,” if a bit “too stage-managed”), followed by a quick non sequitur: news of a man who will attempt to jump out of an airplane without a parachute. Then he’s making a quick calculation of how much he stands to collect if someone (like me) watches “Bonnie and Clyde,” on pay-per-view (“$1.39. Let’s call it $1.40.”) All of which seems like mere throat clearing once Beatty launches into an accounting of the multiple preoccupations of the man he plays in his upcoming movie, Howard Hughes.

“Flying, filming, fornicating. All those F’s! »

- James Rainey

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Pumping It Up: Paul Verhoeven Discusses "Elle"

8 November 2016 8:45 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Is Paul Verhoeven cinema’s most successful mimic? When he went to Hollywood for 1987’s RoboCop, the Dutch director integrated himself so well in his host culture that 1995’s showbiz melodrama Showgirls is still taken by many as foolhardy trash rather than a corrosive critique so intimate with its subject as to appear nearly—or in fact be—indistinguishable. After a return to his home country to make Black Book, one of the 2000s best thrillers and most devilishly twisted recreations of World War 2, and an experiment with a crowd-sourced screenplay in the unusual 2012 short feature Tricked, Verhoeven has changed host bodies yet again, this time to French cinema. Therefore, of course, he mimics the most perfect of French films: a thriller focused on sexual politics and starring Isabelle Huppert.The premise of Elle, adapted from from Philippe Djian's book Oh..., has a horrible come-on: from the director of Basic Instinct, »

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Warren Beatty Says the Film Industry Needs More ‘Mid-Priced Movies’

3 November 2016 10:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

New York City’s Museum of the Moving Image honored Warren Beatty at its 30th annual salute gala on Wednesday, and while Beatty mostly used the opportunity to crack some jokes and thank his longtime friends and collaborators, he also voiced his concern for the future of the movie business.

Read More: Warren Beatty’s ‘Rules Don’t Apply’ Will Open AFI Fest 2016

“We have to figure out in the movie business how we encourage the patrons of the arts to invest in what we would have to call mid-priced movies — movies that cost more than $3 million and less than $103 million,” Beatty said. The 15-time Academy Award nominee, Best Director Oscar Winner and Irving Thalberg Award recipient then pointed out that 1962’s “Lawrence of Arabia,” which he called “one of the greatest movies ever made,” could probably not get funded today. “It’s four hours long, it can only play »

- Graham Winfrey

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001

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