IMDb > Kid Galahad (1962)
Kid Galahad
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Kid Galahad (1962) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

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6.0/10   1,432 votes »
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Down 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
William Fay (screenplay)
Francis Wallace (story)
Contact:
View company contact information for Kid Galahad on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
29 August 1962 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Presley packs the the screen's biggest wallop...with the gals...with the gloves...with the guitar!
Plot:
When he completes his military service Walter Gulick returns to his birthplace, Cream Valley, New York... See more » | Full synopsis »
User Reviews:
The battling grease monkey -- King Of The Whole Wide World... See more (24 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (complete, awaiting verification)

Elvis Presley ... Walter Gulick

Gig Young ... Willy Grogan
Lola Albright ... Dolly Fletcher
Joan Blackman ... Rose Grogan

Charles Bronson ... Lew Nyack

David Lewis ... Otto Danzig
Robert Emhardt ... Maynard
Liam Redmond ... Father Higgins
Judson Pratt ... Howie Zimmerman

Ned Glass ... Max Lieberman
George Mitchell ... Harry Sperling

Roy Roberts ... Jerry Bathgate

Michael Dante ... Joie Shakes
Richard Devon ... Marvin
Jeff Morris ... Ralphie (as Jeffrey Morris)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Chris Alcaide ... Danzig Hood (uncredited)

Edward Asner ... Assistant District Attorney Frank Gerson (uncredited)
David Cadiente ... Boxer (uncredited)
Mushy Callahan ... Romero Fight Referee (uncredited)
Orlando De La Fuente ... Ramon 'Sugarboy' Romero (uncredited)

Nick Dimitri ... Boxer (uncredited)
Louie Elias ... Boxer (uncredited)
Joe Esposito ... Bit Role (uncredited)
Duke Fishman ... Fight Crowd Member (uncredited)
Frank Gerstle ... Romero's Manager (uncredited)

Joe Gray ... Trainer (uncredited)
Harold 'Tommy' Hart ... Tommy Hart--Referee (uncredited)
Al Haskell ... Fight Crowd Member (uncredited)
Jimmie Horan ... Fight Crowd Member (uncredited)
The Jordanaires ... Vocal Group (uncredited)
Kip King ... Round Card Man at Romero Fight (uncredited)
Mike Lally ... Razzing Ringsider (uncredited)
Jimmy Lennon Sr. ... Fight Announcer (uncredited)
George J. Lewis ... Romero's Trainer (uncredited)
Ralph Moody ... Peter J. Prohosko (uncredited)
Gil Perkins ... Freddie (uncredited)
James Rawley ... Doctor (uncredited)

Bert Remsen ... Max (uncredited)
Jeffrey Sayre ... Bevis (uncredited)
Charles Sherlock ... Bailey's Handler (uncredited)
Al Silvani ... Training Camp Spectator (uncredited)
Paul Sorensen ... Joe (uncredited)
Sara Taft ... Father Higgins' Housekeeper (uncredited)
Hal Taggart ... Fight Crowd Member (uncredited)
Sailor Vincent ... Fight Cornerman (uncredited)
Ralph Volkie ... Fight Stadium Attendant (uncredited)
Del 'Sonny' West ... Bit Part (uncredited)

Red West ... Opponent (uncredited)
Harry Wilson ... Bailey Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Bill Zuckert ... O'Grady (uncredited)
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Directed by
Phil Karlson 
 
Writing credits
William Fay (screenplay)

Francis Wallace (story)

Produced by
David Weisbart .... producer
Walter Mirisch .... executive producer (uncredited)
 
Original Music by
Jeff Alexander 
 
Cinematography by
Burnett Guffey 
 
Film Editing by
Stuart Gilmore 
 
Art Direction by
Cary Odell 
 
Set Decoration by
Edward G. Boyle 
 
Makeup Department
Alice Monte .... hairdresser
Lynn F. Reynolds .... makeup artist (as Lynn Reynolds)
 
Production Management
Robert E. Relyea .... unit production manager
Allen K. Wood .... production supervisor
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Jerome M. Siegel .... assistant director
John Flynn .... second assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Frank Agnone .... property
 
Sound Department
Lambert E. Day .... sound (as Lambert Day)
Del Harris .... sound effects editor
 
Special Effects by
Milt Rice .... special effects
 
Stunts
Dick Dial .... fights (uncredited)
Joe Gray .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Jack Spicer .... best boy (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Irene Caine .... wardrobe
Bert Henrikson .... wardrobe
Joan Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Marshall M. Borden .... assistant film editor
 
Music Department
Robert Tracy .... music editor
 
Other crew
Charlsie Bryant .... script supervisor
Eugene Busch .... dialogue coach
Mushy Callahan .... boxing advisor
Tom Parker .... technical advisor (as Col. Tom Parker)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
95 min
Country:
Language:
Color:
Aspect Ratio:
1.85 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Westrex Recording System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Finland:K-12 | Sweden:15 | UK:U (original rating) | UK:PG (re-rating) (1988) | USA:Approved (certificate #20180) | West Germany:16 (nf)
Filming Locations:

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In it's opening weekend film reached place 9.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: Kid Galahad trains for the climactic big fight during the middle of summer, Independence Day to Labor Day, yet when you see all the orange and yellow leaves on the trees and on the ground it is obvious that these scenes were filmed in autumn.See more »
Quotes:
Lew Nyack:What did you think when you read all that phony publicity about yourself?
Walter Gulick:You mean about the 17 knockouts?
Lew Nyack:Yeah.
Walter Gulick:At first I kinda felt sorry for Willy.
Lew Nyack:Sorry for him?
Walter Gulick:He's not a bad guy, Lew. Maybe he's got reason for being a liar. It'd be nice if we can help him out.
Lew Nyack:Help HIM out? Well how about YOU?
[points to a losing boxer being carried to a stretcher]
Lew Nyack:Look at that! Suppose you step out there in that ring and Ezzard Bailey separates you from what little brains you got left? Huh?
Walter Gulick:Yeah, I've been thinking about that too.
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Elvis Found Alive (2012)See more »
Soundtrack:
Love Is for LoversSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
11 out of 13 people found the following review useful.
The battling grease monkey -- King Of The Whole Wide World..., 2 July 2002
Author: Shane Paterson from Las Vegas, NV

I've never seen this movie until now. I've been an Elvis fan since I first found out about the dude a year before his 1977 death, I have hundreds of hours of concert and studio recordings and concert videos, I've even seen the robe that he wore in "Kid Galahad," and yet somehow I never managed to see this 1962 movie (shot in late '61). Was it worth the wait? Well, yes...of course. Is it a classic movie, apart from its inherent cult-classic value as an Elvis film? Well, no, but it's one of his better 1960s movie and I enjoyed it.

The movie came hard on the heels of another atypical film from Elvis, "Follow That Dream," that was in turn preceded by the 1961 box-office giant, "Blue Hawaii." "Blue Hawaii" continued the family-film travelogue kind of movie (set by 1960's "GI Blues") that would set the style for most of Elvis' '60s movie output and that would eventually lead to a downward spiral in Elvis' professional life and job fulfillment that lasted almost 'til decade's end. Elvis as race-car driver. Elvis as boat racer. Elvis as whatever. As Elvis said, after his 1969 return to the stage, it was like they made the same movie a bunch of times and just changed the backdrops. Between "GI Blues" and "Blue Hawaii" came two 'serious' films ("Wild In The Country" and "Flaming Star," both shot in 1960) that couldn't hope to match the commercial success of those glossy musicals but that showed Elvis' potential as a dramatic actor. Both "Kid Galahad" and "Follow That Dream" were also somewhat a departure from the "GI Blues"/"Blue Hawaii" formula, though less so than the two 1960 films that Elvis did for Fox, and each were pretty sparse on songs and much more generous on storyline and characterizations.

"Kid Galahad" was an interesting role for Elvis. The producers threw in a few interesting songs to cater to the fans who'd flock to the film and they're all pleasant and of a high standard -- my favorite's always been the song that opens the movie ("King Of The Whole Wide World") though the excessive overdubbing over the film version waters down much of its magnificence. As was true of Elvis' other better films, this one profits from having a very strong supporting cast, including the likes of Gig Young, Charles Bronson, Lola Albright, and many others. There's even Ed Asner, in his second film role -- Mr Asner played another law-enforcement representative, a policeman, in 1969's "Change Of Habit" (Elvis' last scripted movie). Joan Blackman, Elvis' co-star in "Blue Hawaii," has a less solid role than does Lola Albright but she does it just fine and is certainly a beautiful young woman. Lola Albright is great in her role and Gig Young is lazily perfect for his -- though he seems almost as if he's happily drunk throughout...which, apparently, he was. Chucky Bronson is good in this film even though he's supposedly embarrassed by it. You'd think that a man who inflicted all of those terrible '80s violence movies on the world would find it hard to be embarrassed by anything, but there apparently was friction on the set between him and the easy-going Elvis. Regardless, the on-screen interaction between them is fine. Elvis actually looks like he put on some weight about this time -- also evident in "Follow That Dream" -- but his shirtless scenes reveal that he's pretty solid and he'd lost whatever extra weight he was carrying by the time he started shooting his next film a few months later.

This film was shot on location in Idyllwild, California, which is kind of a kick for me because when I lived in Palm Springs I'd often ride my motorcycle up there and I've since been there with my wife and with my parents. It's a great little town, tucked away in the shadow of Mount San Jacinto, and -- even though I first visited it in 1987 -- I vaguely recognize some of the landmarks. San Jacinto itself certainly looks the same now as in 1961.

The boxing scenes looked pretty convincing to me and are actually quite riveting. People who are expecting to see "Rocky" might be disappointed but, like Mr Balboa, Elvis' Galahad shows convincingly that he can take a brutal series of blows and keep on keeping on. This film came about 18 months after Elvis earned his black belt (from a real hard-case...the grading lasted several hours and involved fighting up to five black-belt opponents) and Elvis had what it took to both take punishment and to learn the physical skills necessary for his role. His well-publicized scuffles back in 1956 showed that he had a lot of heart and an effective self-defense capability, and legendary boxer and coach Mushy Callahan (brought in to train Elvis) was filled with praise for his charge. Charles Bronson didn't agree, but I guess you can't please everybody.

As a whole, the movie's shot every nicely and it's well acted throughout, including by Elvis. I think that he was somewhat better in "Follow That Dream," but that's perhaps only because his character took full advantage of Elvis' considerable comic skills. In "Kid Galahad" another of Elvis' acting strengths -- anger, at which he's particularly convincing -- comes to the fore during a confrontation with Gig Young. For a moment there's a bit of a flashback -- was for me, anyway -- to the way in which he perfected that kind of scene in films like 1957's "Jailhouse Rock," 1958's "King Creole," and "Flaming Star." This a lighter movie than any of those but it has its moments.

I'm glad that I finally saw this film. It's less frenetic and more involved than Elvis' typical '60s movie fare and is worth a look. The "I'm a grease monkey that don't slide too easily" line is pretty classic, too.

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