6.1/10
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2 user 6 critic

Le concerto de la peur (1963)

BANNED over half the World! A French crime potboiler starring Verner and Kalfon as rival gang leaders who clash over control of the narcotics trade. Parisian drug gangs are battling over ... See full synopsis »

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(novel) (as Dominique Dorn), (adaptation)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Nora Rivière
Hans Verner ...
Eric Wolf
...
Bruce Valdo
Jean-Pierre Kalfon ...
Sacha Margieff
Regine Rumen ...
Wanda
Willy Braque ...
Martin, un complice de Sacha
Marcel Champel ...
Tito Mascani
André Rouyer ...
Rif, le complice de Valdo
Jean-Claude Massoulier ...
Un complice de Sacha
Christiane Arnaud
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Storyline

BANNED over half the World!

A French crime potboiler starring Verner and Kalfon as rival gang leaders who clash over control of the narcotics trade. Parisian drug gangs are battling over turf, leading to kidnappings, beatings, murders, betrayals, and other intrigues.

Featuring Chet Baker's marvelous free-jazz Score, (rivaling Miles Davis's for "Ascenseur pour l'echafaud") and the most beautiful French Babes the World has ever seen. It pricks the Conscience, probes the libido, and excites the senses!

Finally, this picture can be seen in the U.S. after 3 years in court.

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The Owned her Body... She had destroyed her soul! See more »

Genres:

Thriller

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Release Date:

29 November 1963 (France)  »

Also Known As:

Night of Lust  »

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beatings, babes & Chet Baker
17 January 2006 | by (Montreal) – See all my reviews

Probably best known in America for Chet Baker's marvellous free-jazz score (rivalling Miles Davis's for "Ascenseur pour l'echafaud"), this is a cheaply made but enjoyably atmospheric and idiosyncratic crime movie. A couple of Parisian drug gangs (one led by a blind, philosophical, trumpet-playing boss) are battling over turf, leading to kidnappings, beatings, murders, betrayals and other intrigues. And this being a José Benazeraf film, there are timeouts for stolen lust, striptease and a great cat fight.

Like all JB's early films, the action scenes are a bit slipshod, and the dialog and acting at times risible (or at least campy), but he has a fine sense for composition and a wonderful manner of elegantly posing (and, with females, draping) his characters against gritty backdrops. He always managed to cast strikingly sensuous, angel-faced women in strong roles, never more so than in this picture. If you're looking for that enigmatic, self-consciously noirish late-show style of Sam Fuller, or Lemmy Caution (but more intellectually inclined), or early Hollywood-quoting Godard (but less intellectually inclined), then you'll get it in spades here.

Apparently, the notorious L.A. schlockmeister Bob Cresse picked this little number up, cut and added some footage, and released it as "Night of Lust", earning a tidy profit.


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