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Lee Marvin Died 29 Years Ago Today – Here Are His Ten Best Films

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, and Tom Stockman

Lee Marvin rose through the ranks of movie stardom as a character actor, delivering mostly villainous supporting turns in many films before finally graduating to leading roles. Regardless of which side of the law he was on however, he projected a tough-as-nails intensity and a two-fisted integrity which elevated even the slightest material. Born February 19, 1924, in New York City, Marvin quit high school to enter the Marine Corps and while serving in the South Pacific was badly wounded in battle when a machine gun nest shot off part of his buttocks and severed his sciatic nerve. He spent a year in recovery before returning to the U.S. where he began working as a plumber. The acting bug bit after filling in for an ailing summer-stock actor and he studied the art at the New York-based American Theater Wing. Upon making his debut in summer stock,
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

Barnaby Jones, Six Million Dollar Man: Actor Stuart Nisbet Dies at 82

Prolific TV and film character actor Stuart Nisbet has died at the age of 82. Nisbet died on Thursday, June 23, 2016, at USC Verdugo Hills Hospital in Glendale, California. If you watched TV before 2002, you have seen Mr. Nisbet. The first TV series credit on his IMDb profile is for a 1960 episode of The Tab Hunter Show. The last is for a 2001 episode of The Practice.Between that, Nisbet appeared on every TV show from Route 66 (1961), to Hazel (1963-64), to Dr. Kildare (1961-66), The Monkees (1967), Get Smart (1966-69), The Virginian (1962-69), Bonanza (1961-72), Columbo (1972-73), The Six Million Dollar Man (1974-77), Barnaby Jones (1973-80), Quincy M.E. (1980-81), Baywatch (1991), and Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman (1997).Read More…
See full article at TVSeriesFinale »

Peter Brown, Star of TV Western ‘Lawman,’ Dies at 80

Peter Brown, Star of TV Western ‘Lawman,’ Dies at 80
Peter Brown, who played Deputy Johnny McKay on 1960s TV Western “Lawman,” died March 21 in Phoenix, Arizona. He was 80.

Brown played McKay on ABC’s “Lawman” during the entire 1958-62 run of the series, which starred John Russell as Marshal Dan Troop. Brown was also a regular on NBC Western “Laredo,” playing Chad Cooper during the series’ 1965-67 run. This story of the Texas Ranger starred Neville Brand as Reese Bennett.

Brown also guested on a number of other TV Westerns, including “Maverick,” “Cheyenne” and “The Virginian.”

On the big screen during the period he appeared in Disney’s Hayley Mills musical “Summer Magic” (1963), surfing movie “Ride the Wild Surf” (1964) and Ann-Margret vehicle “Kitten With a Whip” (1964).

During the 1970s while continuing his TV career, Brown played the villain in the 1974 blaxploitation classic “Foxy Brown,” starred with William Smith in “Piranha” (1972) and starred in the horror-thriller “Act of Vengeance” (1974). He
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Lee Majors Is Ash's Dad in 'Ash Vs Evil Dead' Season 2

Lee Majors Is Ash's Dad in 'Ash Vs Evil Dead' Season 2
Starz has announced today that Lee Majors (Do You Believe?) will play the role of Brock Williams, Ash's father, and Ted Raimi (Xena: Warrior Princess, Spider-Man) will play the role of Ash's childhood best friend, Chet Kaminski, in the Starz Original series Ash Vs. Evil Dead. The series was previously renewed for a second season and will return in 2016. Starz hasn't announced when the show will premiere yet, or when production may begin.

Majors started his television career in The Big Valley, going on to The Men from Shiloh, to Owen Marshall Counselor at Law to The Six Million Dollar Man to The Fall Guy to Tour of Duty to Raven and countless television appearances on many series, specials, award shows and movies. He began his film career with Will Penny alongside Charlton Heston. Majors recently completed filming two movies Almosting It and Do You Believe?. Majors will start filming
See full article at MovieWeb »

Ash vs. Evil Dead Adds Lee Majors (as Dad!), Dead Vet Ted Raimi for Season 2

Ash vs. Evil Dead Adds Lee Majors (as Dad!), Dead Vet Ted Raimi for Season 2
Ash Williams’ pop is no less than The Six Million Dollar Man.

TV vet Lee Majors has boarded Season 2 of Starz’s Ash vs. Evil Dead in the role of Brock Williams, the title character’s father, it was announced on Wednesday.

RelatedCable/Streaming Renewal Scorecard 2016: What’s Coming Back? What’s Cancelled? What’s On the Bubble?

Also joining the horror dramedy is Ted Raimi, who has appeared in all of the Evil Dead features (in assorted roles) and here will play Ash’s childhood Bff, Chet Kaminski. (Raimi’s older brother Sam, of course, is the Evil Dead auteur himself,
See full article at TVLine.com »

Ash Vs Evil Dead Season 2 Adds Lee Majors & Ted Raimi

  • DailyDead
Two groovy new additions have been made to the Season 2 cast of Ash vs Evil Dead, as Starz has announced that Lee Majors will play Brock Williams, the father of Ash, while Ted Raimi—who appeared in the first three Evil Dead movies—will play Chet Kaminski, Ash's best friend from childhood.

Press Release: Beverly Hills, Calif., February 10, 2016 - Starz has announced today that Lee Majors (Do You Believe) will play the role of Brock Williams, Ash’s father, and Ted Raimi (“Xena: Warrior Princess,” Spider-Man) will play the role of Ash’s childhood best friend, Chet Kaminski, in the Starz Original series “Ash vs Evil Dead.” The series was previously renewed for a second season and will return in 2016.

Majors started his television career in “The Big Valley,” going on to “The Men from Shiloh,” to “Owen Marshall Counselor at Law,” to “The Six Million Dollar Man,” to “The Fall Guy,
See full article at DailyDead »

Lee Majors and Ted Raimi Join Ash vs Evil Dead Season 2

Starz has announced today that Lee Majors (Do You Believe) will play the role of Brock Williams, Ash’s father, and Ted Raimi (“Xena: Warrior Princess,” Spider-Man) will play the role of Ash’s childhood best friend, Chet Kaminski, in the Starz Original series Ash vs Evil Dead. The series was previously renewed for a second season and will return in 2016.

Majors started his television career in “The Big Valley,” going on to “The Men from Shiloh,” to “Owen Marshall Counselor at Law,” to “The Six Million Dollar Man,” to “The Fall Guy,” to “Tour of Duty,” to “Raven” and countless television appearances on many series, specials, award shows and movies. He began his film career with Will Penny and Charlton Heston. Majors recently completed filming two movies Almosting It and Do You Believe. Majors will start filming on two feature films this summer, plus he has a lineup of
See full article at LRM Online »

The Black List’s 2015 List of Best Unproduced Screenplays

Rounding up the best unproduced screenplays in Hollywood, as voted on by hundreds of film executives, The Black List has been a strong resource to clue one in on projects to potentially anticipate, but first, to kickstart Hollywood on bringing them to screen. Last year’s chart-topper Catherine the Great is still waiting to be produced and today we have this year’s editiong

Topping the 2015 edition, we have Isaac Adamson‘s Bubbles, which tells the story of Michael Jackson through the strange perspective of his adopted baby chimp. Also included is the Boston Marathon bombing drama Stronger, which Jake Gyllenhaal was circling, and Miss Sloane, which has Jessica Chastain attached. So, as an early look for some potential upcoming films to keep on your radar, take a looked at the full, detailing list below, along with the number of votes each earned.

Bubbles by Isaac Adamson 44

A baby chimp
See full article at The Film Stage »

Black List 2015 Topped by Michael Jackson Chimp Script, Features JFK Drama

Black List 2015 Topped by Michael Jackson Chimp Script, Features JFK Drama
The 2015 Black List, consisting of Hollywood’s top unproduced screenplays, was announced by Reese Witherspoon, Channing Tatum, Catherine Hardwicke, Damon Lindelof, Phil Lord and Christopher Miller, and other actors, producers, directors and writers via YouTube videos on Monday.

The screenplays were revealed on the Black List’s Twitter and YouTube accounts throughout the morning. This year’s 11th edition consists of 81 scripts. “Selma” director Ava DuVernay announced the very first project, Ridgeway Wilson and Chloe Castellón’s “An African Western.”

Isaac Adamson’s story about Michael Jackson’s chimp, “Bubbles,” led the list with 44 votes. Samuel V. Franco and Evan Kilgore’s “Mayday 109” script about President John F. Kennedy’s World War II days also made the list.

Black List scripts — “Slumdog Millionaire,” “The King’s Speech” and “Argo” — have gone on to win three best picture Oscars in recent years. This year’s award season contenders, “The Revenant,” “Spotlight
See full article at Variety - Film News »

'Hateful Eight' Photo Has Kurt Russell and Sam Jackson Hitching a Ride

'Hateful Eight' Photo Has Kurt Russell and Sam Jackson Hitching a Ride
Following the first Hateful Eight photos that debuted back in May, Entertainment Weekly has released a new photo from director Quentin Tarantino's Western, which is set for release on Christmas Day. The photo gives us a better look at bounty hunter John Ruth, played by Kurt Russell, who is seen taking aim at an unspecified enemy from a stagecoach, which Samuel L. Jackson's Major Marquis Warren is also riding in. The director reveals that his movie is the "funniest snow Western" in cinematic history.

"I can definitely say that as bleak as our movie is, we are definitely the funniest snow Western ever made. This is funnier than The Great Silence, it's funnier than Day of the Outlaw. Oh, yeah, funnier than McCabe & Mrs. Miller."

Quentin Tarantino also revealed that his story is crafted much like Western TV shows such as The Virginian and Bonanza, since those shows
See full article at MovieWeb »

The Hateful Eight Image Finds Kurt Russell Taking Aim

Quentin Tarantino is bringing The Hateful Eight to Comic-Con next week, but until the Western’s anticipated panel takes place, here’s another image from the star-studded pic, courtesy of EW.

Kurt Russell plays bounty hunter John Ruth, while Samuel L. Jackson is playing Major Marquis Warren. Both are definitely the kinds of guys you don’t want to end up stranded with – but that’s exactly what happens in the film, when a blizzard traps Ruth and Warren in a stagecoach stopover with an assortment of other rogues. Bloodshed ensues, but Tarantino assures the mag that there’s some humor on screen, too:

“I can definitely say that as bleak as our movie is, we are definitely the funniest snow Western ever made. This is funnier than The Great Silence, it’s funnier than Day of the Outlaw.”

The director also cites Bonanza and The Virginian as two influences on his latest movie,
See full article at We Got This Covered »

The Hateful Eight: New Image Teases “the Funniest Snow Western Ever Made”

We've still got a little more than a week to go until Quentin Tarantino and the cast show off new material from The Hateful Eight at the film's San Diego Comic-Con panel, but in the meantime, how about another new image? EW just shared a shot of Kurt Russell as bounty hunter John Ruth and Samuel L. Jackson as Major Marquis Warren as well as a quote from Tarantino regarding the humor in the film: “I can definitely say that as bleak as our movie is, we are definitely the funniest snow Western ever made. This is funnier than The Great Silence, it’s funnier than Day of the Outlaw.” Tarantino also explained how shows like The Virginian and Bonanza influenced the film: “You wait the whole episode to find out, ‘Are they a good guy or are they a bad guy?’ So I thought, ‘What if I did a
See full article at Collider.com »

Monica Lewis, Actress, Singer, Dies at 93

Monica Lewis, a former Benny Goodman vocalist who headlined the very first broadcast of “The Ed Sullivan Show,” was the voice of the popular Chiquita Banana cartoons, clowned opposite Jerry Lewis, Red Skelton and Danny Kaye, and had co-starring roles in such films as “Earthquake,” “Airport 1975” and “The ConcordeAirport ’79,” died on June 12 of natural causes at her apartment in Woodland Hills, Calif. She was 93.

Lewis was born in Chicago to a musical family headed by her father Leon Lewis, who was a symphonic composer and conductor. Her mother Jessica sang with the Chicago Opera Company and her sister Barbara was an accomplished classical pianist. Her brother Marlo became head of variety for CBS-tv and created Ed Sullivan’s “Toast of the Town” show.

Monica studied voice with her mother from the time she was a toddler, but when the family lost everything during the Depression, they moved to New York to start over.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Leonard Nimoy: 1931-2015

  • IMDb News
Leonard Nimoy: 1931-2015
Leonard Nimoy, the eloquent, baritone-voiced actor and director who will forever be remembered as the Starship Enterprise's supremely logical half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock, died on Friday in Los Angeles. He was 83 years old.

Although his most recent major television role was on Fox's "Fringe," Nimoy's work on the television series "Star Trek" led to Spock becoming one of the most beloved sci-fi characters in the history of the genre. It also earned him three Emmy nominations for the role. Today Spock's V-shaped Vulcan hand salute, accompanied by the gentle benediction, "Live long and prosper," is recognized around the world. The "Star Trek" franchise may have defined the better part of Nimoy's career and made him a pop culture icon, but the man was as versatile as he was famous. He authored a number of books, recorded several albums, directed television episodes and theatrical releases (including the 1987 comedy blockbuster 3 Men and a Baby) and won critical notice as a respected photographer over the course of his lifetime.

Born in Boston on March 26, 1931, to Yiddish-speaking Orthodox Jewish immigrants from Ukraine, Nimoy began acting in community theater at the age of eight. His first major role came at age 17, when he played Ralphie in an amateur production of Clifford Odets's "Awake and Sing." After receiving career advice from an actor in another Odets play making its pre-Broadway debut in Boston, he submitted an application to California's Pasadena Playhouse. Nimoy would then relocate to the West Coast using his earnings from selling vacuum cleaners.

Nimoy made his film debut at age 20 in the 1951 film Queen for a Day, and won a small role as a ballplayer in the film Rhubarb, which was released in the same year. His first movie lead was the title role in the 1952 film Kid Monk Baroni. Nimoy then took drama classes at Boston College in 1953.

Following a stint in the Army between 1953 and 1955, Nimoy had guest starring roles in a number of television series. Starting in 1958, he appeared in "Sea Hunt," "Highway Patrol," "Bonanza," "The Untouchables," "Get Smart" and "The Virginian." He also guest starred in an episode of "The Twilight Zone" titled "A Quality of Mercy," and would work with his future co-star and friend William Shatner in the "The Project Strigas Affair" episode of "The Man from U.N.C.L.E."

But it was Nimoy's role in a 1964 episode of "The Lieutenant" that caught the eye of a producer and writer named Gene Roddenberry, who cast Nimoy in his new series "Star Trek." Nimoy is the only member of "Star Trek's" main cast to appear in every episode of the series, including the original unaired pilot. Of the famous Vulcan salute, Nimoy once explained that he based it on the way the rabbis in his childhood held their hands while giving blessings. (He also invented the Vulcan nerve pinch when he and the "Trek" writers needed a non-violent means for Spock to overpower an enemy.) The series only ran until 1969, but went on to inspire a movie franchise and four spinoffs. Nimoy co-starred with the rest of the original cast in the first six installments of the theatrical series, starting with "Star Trek: The Motion Picture" in 1979. He also directed the third and fourth "Trek" films, 1984's Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and 1986's Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home. Nimoy returned to play Spock Prime for J.J. Abrams' 2009 resurrection of the theatrical franchise and its sequel, Star Trek: Into Darkness.

After the original "Star Trek's" cancellation, Nimoy joined the cast of "Mission: Impossible" playing The Great Paris, a master of impersonation. The actor stayed with that series until 1971. He enjoyed roles in a number of television movies, eventually earning a best supporting actor Emmy nomination for "A Woman Called Golda" in 1982.

Nimoy did not limit his artistic exploration to stage and screen, however. He authored several books of poetry and two autobiographies, the first being the somewhat-controversial 1977 tome "I Am Not Spock," which examined his self-declared identity crisis brought on by being associated with the character. His second, 1995's "I Am Spock," revealed that he had reached a certain peace with the influence the role had on his life. He also recorded several albums, most of which are considered to be masterpieces of unintentional camp.

Nimoy was an avid photographer, having studied photography at the University of California, Los Angeles, in the 1970s. In 2002 he released a provocative collection of photographs titled "The Shekhina Project," which drew controversy for its depiction of Jewish female nudes. Five years after its publication, Nimoy examined the beauty in plus-sized women for 2007's "The Full Body Project."

Nimoy's final TV role was in "Fringe," in which he played genius scientist and Massive Dynamic CEO William Bell, and his final voice-acting role was for the animated film Zambezia.

The actor also was very active on social media, sharing affirmations and words of wisdom on Twitter accompanied by his sign-off, "LLAP," or "Live Long and Prosper." His final tweet, dated February 22, told his 1.13 million followers, "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. "

Nimoy is survived by his wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, his two children, director Adam Nimoy and Julie Nimoy, from his previous marriage to Sandra Zober, as well as a stepson and several grandchildren.

Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83

Leonard Nimoy, ‘Star Trek’s’ Spock, Dies at 83
Leonard Nimoy lived up to his longtime catchphrase: Live long and prosper. Having achieved success in many arenas during his lifetime, the actor, director, writer and photographer has died at age 83. His wife, Susan Bay Nimoy, reportedly confirmed his death to the New York Times, saying the cause was end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Most widely known for his performance as half-human, half-Vulcan science officer Spock on the classic sci-fi TV show “Star Trek” and its many subsequent film and videogame incarnations, Nimoy was also a successful director, helming “Star Trek” pics “The Search for Spock” and “The Voyage Home,” as well as non-“Star Trek” fare; an accomplished stage actor; a published writer and poet; and a noted photographer. He also dabbled in singing and songwriting.

But despite his varied talents, Nimoy will forever be linked with the logical Mr. Spock. Spotted by “Star Trek” creator Gene Roddenberry when
See full article at Variety - Film News »

"If It's Not Right, Don't Do It": A Tribute To Western Icon Clint Walker

  • CinemaRetro
By Joe Elliott

Long-time Grass Valley, California resident (Norman Eugene) Clint Walker starred in the iconic television western Cheyenne from 1955-1963. This was the golden era of TV westerns, with dozens of similar shows airing around the same time.

Like their big screen counterparts, TV cowboys were usually handsome, brave, resourceful and of course good with a gun. However, there was something a bit different about the Cheyenne Bodie character as Walker portrayed him. He fit the genre all right. A big, handsome man built like an oak tree (6’6”, 48-inch chest, 32-inch waist), he rode easy in the saddle and looked better than almost anybody in a Stetson and boots. Men who doubted his resolve always ended up regretting it. Ladies looked his way. Still, despite never violating the conventions of the formula, Walker somehow managed to make the sum of his character add up to more than its parts.
See full article at CinemaRetro »

More retirement talk from Quentin Tarantino, discusses his inspiration for The Hateful Eight

A couple of years ago, Quentin Tarantino suggested that he’d hang up his directing gloves after reaching ten films, stating that he didn’t want his filmography to suffer as he became an “old-man filmmaker”. Well, he’s now reiterated those thoughts during a Q&A at the American Film Market, where he was promoting his upcoming western The Hateful Eight.

“I don’t believe you should stay onstage until people are begging you to get off,” said Tarantino (via Deadline). “I like the idea of leaving them wanting a bit more. I do think directing is a young man’s game, and I like the idea of an umbilical cord connection from my first to my last movie. I’m not trying to ridicule anyone who thinks differently, but I want to go out while I’m still hard. … I like that I will leave a 10-film filmography,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87

Rosemary Murphy, ‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Actress, Dies at 87
Rosemary Murphy, who appeared as the neighbor Maudie Atkinson in the classic 1962 film adaptation of “To Kill a Mockingbird,” starring Gregory Peck, died Saturday in New York City. She was 87 and had recently been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.

Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.BzHqOdBQ.dpuf Murphy, who won her Emmy for portraying the mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt in the 1976 ABC miniseries Eleanor and Franklin, died Saturday at her home in New York City, her longtime agent, Alan Willig, told The Hollywood Reporter. She recently was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. – See more at: http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/rosemary-murphy-dead-kill-mockingbird-717521#sthash.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Movie Marquee of the Week: Thanksgiving Edition

  • MUBI
This incredible photograph appeared yesterday on a post on The Wire titled “The Macy’s Thanksgiving Parade Balloons Used to Be Extremely Creepy.” I immediately loved the photograph with its Frank Sidebottom-style floating heads but what caught my attention next is the sign just visible behind the head in the middle: a marquee for Josef von Sternberg’s Morocco. Now if there’s one thing I love more than bizarrely primitive helium-filled heads, it’s old photos of movie marquees. And if there’s one thing I love even more than that, it is examining the often-missed details of old photos and looking for clues to their place and time. (Anyone who’s a fan of Shorpy will know what I mean.)

The only specific detail on the original post is that the photo was taken in 1930, a fact that the Morocco marquee confirms. This means that it was
See full article at MUBI »

Interview: Tapping Bruce Dern for His New FIlm ‘Nebraska’

Chicago – Veteran actor Bruce Dern is now up to bat. That is how he describes what is at stake in his role as Woody in director Alexander Payne’s new film, “Nebraska.” But this film icon – with an over 50 year career – also has plenty other stories to offer, regarding Jack Nicholson, his family, his life and performing a “Derns-ser.”

Bruce Dern began his on-screen career in TV beginning in 1960, taking various character parts during that era, with regular cowboy roles in “Wagon Train,” “The Virginian” and “The Big Valley.” He made his film debut in the horror classic “Hush, Hush Sweet Charlotte” (1964), and created memorable characters in such diverse films as “They Shoot Horses, Don’t They” (1969), “Drive, He Said” (1971), “The Great Gatsby” (1974), “Smile” (1975) and “Family Plot” (1976). Recent films include roles in “Monster” (2003), “The Astronaut Farmer” (2006) and as Frank Harlow in the HBO series “Big Love” (2006-11). He was nominated
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »
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